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Meaning Of Christmas

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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff WriterSun Staff WriterSun Staff Writer | December 25, 1994
Hospice patients and families find last Christmas 0) 'bittersweet'For families of the terminally ill, this Christmas may be the last they share with someone they love, a pain that also brings unexpected moments of tenderness."
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By Dennis Byrne and Dennis Byrne,Chicago Tribune | December 25, 2007
Cheer up; the kids haven't forgotten the true meaning of Christmas. I should say that at least my grandchildren haven't; I can't speak about all the rest. But then, the kids have time to contemplate the true meaning of Christmas, not having to lug in a Christmas tree and decorate it, shop for everyone who deserves or expects a present, figure out where all the money will be coming from, write Christmas cards, cook Christmas Eve and Christmas meals for the entire extended family and then clean up the whole mess.
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By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1995
For Patsy A. Brown, 50, unemployed, broke, with no health insurance and vision clouded by cataracts, Christmas came early yesterday.Early in the morning, a doctor at an outpatient clinic in Glen Burnie removed the cataracts in her right eye, restoring her vision to near normal, for free.It was "the greatest [Christmas present] I've ever, ever had," Mrs. Brown said as she sipped orange juice and nibbled pastries in a recovery room. "I've never had anyone do anything like this for me."Dr. Paul A. Kohlhepp, chief surgeon of the eye center, said the free surgery is "something that we've been trying to do a long time at Christmas time and things just never actually clicked."
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
The Nativity scene tonight at the Shrine of Saint Anthony in Ellicott City will have the bite of winter air, the bleating of real sheep and the sight of a living Mary and Joseph cradling an infant Jesus. The purpose "is to help people to reflect on the meaning of Christmas beyond the commercialism and the ma- terialism," said the Rev. Bart A. Karwacki, a Franciscan friar at the shrine and organizer of the event. "That is why we keep it as simple as possible." The live, outdoor scene -- called a Greccio, after the Italian town where St. Francis first held such a display in 1223 -- is just one event in a series of Advent and Christmas activities intended to bring more visitors to the shrine amid the rolling hills of central Howard County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | December 14, 1995
Gian-Carlo Menotti's one-act opera, "Amahl and the Night Visitors," has acquired the seasonal status of Handel's "Messiah" or Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" -- we simply can't endure December without it. This lovely musical drama about the birth of Christ and the true meaning of Christmas will be performed Sunday at 7 p.m. at the Second Presbyterian Church.The church is at 4200 St. Paul St. Admission is free, parking is plentiful and early comers will be treated to a 6 p.m. performance of carols on early instruments on the church lawn.
NEWS
By Dennis Byrne and Dennis Byrne,Chicago Tribune | December 25, 2007
Cheer up; the kids haven't forgotten the true meaning of Christmas. I should say that at least my grandchildren haven't; I can't speak about all the rest. But then, the kids have time to contemplate the true meaning of Christmas, not having to lug in a Christmas tree and decorate it, shop for everyone who deserves or expects a present, figure out where all the money will be coming from, write Christmas cards, cook Christmas Eve and Christmas meals for the entire extended family and then clean up the whole mess.
NEWS
By Melinda Rice and Melinda Rice,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 22, 1997
LIFELONG Annapolitan Albert C. Stanton recorded his own Christmas album this year with his granddaughters, 11-year-old Farren Stanton, 12-year-old Danielle Haskin and 7-year-old Breonna Stanton.On the tapes, Stanton discusses the meaning of Christmas with his granddaughters. The tale is interspersed with the girls singing, "We Really Want to Be Like Jesus."Stanton, a deacon at the Second Baptist Church in Annapolis, will give $1 from the sale of each tape to the Feed the Children Fund, an international hunger-eradication program.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 12, 2000
IT'S THAT TIME of year when many people are busy preparing to celebrate Christmas. In all of the confusion, hustle and bustle, the meaning of Christmas often gets lost. That is why the congregation of Faith Lutheran Church on St. Andrews Way in Eldersburg is preparing to perform its 20th annual Live Nativity. Because the grounds of the church back up to Liberty Road, the Nativity can easily be seen by passing motorists. Each year, more than 1,000 people stop to see the performance, a re-creation of the birth of Christ.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | December 21, 1992
It was cold, dark and muddy in the field beside Pastor Mike Hubers' house Friday night, but the angels, shepherds and Roman soldiers milling about seemed oblivious. The members of Fellowship Baptist Church greeted each other warmly, adjusting costumes and props.Soon, they would settle into a living nativity in the field in Ferndale, among bales of hay, sheep, a donkey and a goat.They hoped to use the production, with elaborate props, costumes, live animals and 30 church members in 15 rotating roles, to recapture the true meaning of Christmas, explained John Yesker, who played the angel Gabriel.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | December 2, 1994
The red and white candy canes dangling from the Christmas tree in the South Columbia Baptist Church dining room are more than sticky, tasty treats. To members of the congregation, they are traditional reminders of Jesus Christ.According to legend, the candy cane represents a shepherd's crook, symbol of Jesus as the good shepherd, said Iris White, a member of the congregation, which is sponsoring a two-day event ending today on the meaning of Christmas and its symbols.Called "Christmas Spoken Here," the Guilford Road church's open house continues from 7 p.m. to 9:30 tonight.
NEWS
By Ellen Barry and Ellen Barry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 19, 2004
RALEIGH, N.C. - This year, as Christmas season swung into gear, Pastor Patrick Wooden's followers fanned out to shopping malls across Raleigh to deliver a muscular message of holiday cheer: As Christian shoppers, they would like to be greeted with the phrase "Merry Christmas" - not a bland "Happy Holidays" - and stores that failed to do so would risk losing their business. Nearly six weeks later, some citizens in Raleigh are seething over what they see as an attempt to force religion into the public square.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 2004
In the midst of the hustle and bustle of the Christmas season, local churches are featuring sermons, concerts and outreach activities to promote the real meaning of the holiday - the birth of Jesus Christ. At St. Louis parish in Clarksville, the largest Roman Catholic church in Howard County, 10 Masses will be celebrated on Christmas Eve and four on Christmas Day. Children who attend the parish's religious education program will perform a Nativity play - the story of Jesus' birth in Bethlehem - at 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. Christmas Eve. "In all of these, we are celebrating looking at who the child was," said Monsignor Joseph L. Luca, pastor of the church.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 15, 2004
ARLINGTON, Va. - In Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol, Ebenezer Scrooge is surrounded by merriment and acts of charity. None of it, not even the long-suffering kindness of his nephew, has the slightest influence on his hard heart. It is only when the angel prototypes - the "ghosts" of Christmas Past, Present and Future - confront him with what might be called his "sin" that Scrooge comes to his senses, repents and is "converted." That message of conversion - indeed, the "original intent" of the Christmas message - is obscured in the boisterous celebration of something that has nothing to do with the "reason for the season" and now also involves lawyers and complaining liberal and conservative ministers who either demand that people not celebrate Christmas or want everyone to celebrate it as they do. The battles of Christmas 2004 include protesters in Denver who marched and sang carols along an official parade route because they had been denied entry by "Parade of Lights" sponsors.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2000
CELEBRATING THE Christmas season takes on many forms. Some people enjoy the decorating, assembling elaborate outdoor layouts of lights, figures and forms for those passing by to enjoy. Others enjoy the hunt, foraging through shops and malls for the perfect present at the right price for those near and dear. But helping us find the real reason to celebrate the Christmas season, several area churches have scheduled events for families to join and share in the joy of Christ's birth. Arundel Singers concert St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, 7859 Tick Neck Road, invites the community to a Christmas concert by the Arundel Singers at 7 p.m. tomorrow.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 12, 2000
IT'S THAT TIME of year when many people are busy preparing to celebrate Christmas. In all of the confusion, hustle and bustle, the meaning of Christmas often gets lost. That is why the congregation of Faith Lutheran Church on St. Andrews Way in Eldersburg is preparing to perform its 20th annual Live Nativity. Because the grounds of the church back up to Liberty Road, the Nativity can easily be seen by passing motorists. Each year, more than 1,000 people stop to see the performance, a re-creation of the birth of Christ.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1999
Dr. Glen Brubaker is giving up the Comforts and joys of Christmas with his family and spending the holiday helping earthquake victims in Turkey.The 58-year-old doctor, who is the medical adviser to Inter-Church-Medical Assistance in New Windsor, left his home in Lancaster, Pa., on Wednesday for Ankara, capital of the predominantly Muslim country. He will oversee a $50,000 shipment of medicine and hospital supplies donated by Lutheran World Relief and sorely needed in areas devastated by the earthquakes in August and November.
NEWS
December 25, 1991
This day of deep religious celebration finds people across the globe carrying on the holiday tradition in a sea of enormous change and uncertainty. The Soviet Union that the world has known and feared for over seven decades is no more. Arab and Israeli negotiators are, amazingly, attempting to reconcile irreconcilable differences of profound human and historical significance. The apartheid that has defined South Africa is gradually melting away as that country continues its tortured struggle toward multi-racial democracy.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1999
Dr. Glen Brubaker is giving up the Comforts and joys of Christmas with his family and spending the holiday helping earthquake victims in Turkey.The 58-year-old doctor, who is the medical adviser to Inter-Church-Medical Assistance in New Windsor, left his home in Lancaster, Pa., on Wednesday for Ankara, capital of the predominantly Muslim country. He will oversee a $50,000 shipment of medicine and hospital supplies donated by Lutheran World Relief and sorely needed in areas devastated by the earthquakes in August and November.
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