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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2010
As diners arrived for the last free meal at Carpenter's Kitchen, Caroleann Myers stood by the entrance, hugging regulars with outstretched arms as if she were greeting them into her own home for Christmas dinner. But a ritual that spanned more than two decades was coming to an end. The program that served a hot meal each week at the Mount Vernon Place United Methodist Church to about 300 of the city's needy was shutting down, despite the efforts of Myers, the program's director. "Miss Caroleann was always there.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Bryan Voltaggio is opening his second restaurant in Baltimore. Family Meal, a contemporary diner, will open in the old Houlihan's location at the Inner Harbor before the end of the year. "We truly feel this is going to be a great addition to the harbor,"  Voltaggio  said.  Voltaggio opened the original Family Meal in a former Frederick car dealership built in the 1960s. In June, the  "Top Chef" alumnus opened an Italian restaurant named Aggio at Power Plant Live.  In addition to his Frederick restaurants, Volt and Family Meal, Voltaggio is the owner and executive chef of two establishments in Washington: the meat-focused restaurant Range and the contemporary Italian restaurant Aggio, which share a space in the Chevy Chase Pavilion but have separate menus.
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NEWS
September 13, 2006
In a new feature starting next month, we're inviting ourselves over for breakfast, lunch or dinner - with a nutritionist along - to make over some of the less-than-healthful meals so many of us eat. Are you the single guy who lives on takeout? Does your Sunday family dinner need an overhaul? Do you stare sadly at the vending machine on the night shift? Send an e-mail to elizabeth.large@baltsun.com with "Makeover" in the subject line, your name and phone number, and a bit about the meal (or snack)
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 30, 2014
Like Thanksgiving, Labor Day is a national holiday. Unlike Thanksgiving, it does not have an official meal. One-hundred-and-twenty years on, it's time we had one. I'm nominating the peppers-and-eggs sandwich as the official meal of Labor Day, and I'll tell you why in a moment. First, some declarations. 1. Most people only think of Labor Day as a day off at the end of summer, or a good day to buy a dishwasher. Lost is its original meaning: a "national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity and well-being of our country.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 30, 2014
Like Thanksgiving, Labor Day is a national holiday. Unlike Thanksgiving, it does not have an official meal. One-hundred-and-twenty years on, it's time we had one. I'm nominating the peppers-and-eggs sandwich as the official meal of Labor Day, and I'll tell you why in a moment. First, some declarations. 1. Most people only think of Labor Day as a day off at the end of summer, or a good day to buy a dishwasher. Lost is its original meaning: a "national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity and well-being of our country.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
As part of the restaurant chain's ninth annual Cow Appreciation Day celebration, Chick-fil-A is offering a free combo meal (breakfast, lunch or dinner) to any customer who visits one of its restaurants fully dressed as a cow on Friday, July 12. Customers will also receive a free entree of their choice for wearing any cow-spotted accessory, such as a hat, tie, scarf or purse. The Laurel Chick-fil-A restaurants are located at the Centre at Laurel, 13600 Baltimore Ave., or Corridor Marketplace, 3366 Corridor Marketplace.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | September 4, 1994
Walk into a restaurant serving a business clientele today and you're likely to see a businesswoman courting a client over the chicken cordon bleu, or making a sales pitch over the house salad.As is true in so many areas, our past training helps rather than hinders us when it comes to entertaining for business purposes. We were carefully taught to be good listeners and to be aware of other people's needs and feelings, after all.Here are a dozen additional hints to help ensure that your business entertaining is always productive:* Remember that this meal is primarily a business meeting, not a social occasion.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Reporter | March 21, 2007
For this month's Make Over My Meal came a novel subject -- the man who never eats in. "I eat out 21 meals a week, 52 weeks a year, year in and year out," real-estate lawyer Stuart Kaplow wrote to us. "And no, I never do takeout." Working hard and playing hard are firmly in Kaplow's repertoire. But cooking? Not so much. He says he doesn't generally bring food into his Brooklandville home. Nor does he set foot in grocery stores. Late-night munch-ies? Because he likes to be ready to wake up early, that's not a problem.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | February 27, 2000
This week's menus Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an enter-taining menu that's...
NEWS
March 1, 2014
Dan Janssen has eaten pizza for almost every meal for a quarter of a century. Pizza for breakfast. Pizza for lunch. Pizza for dinner. And almost always, it's plain cheese pizza. "I do eat a bowl of Raisin Bran once a week or so if I want to be healthy," said Janssen, 38, of Ellicott City. "But usually it's just pizza and coffee. " Janssen said he ate a normal "meat-and-potatoes" diet when he was growing up, but decided to stop eating meat for ethical reasons when he was a young teenager.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Throwing a party is no reason to panic ­ - or spend a fortune. One of Chef Nikki McGowan's go-to party dishes is a huge pot of mussels, which she loves because they are simple to prepare and inexpensive - but also delicious and fun to eat.  McGowan, who teaches cooking classes for kids and adults at CKCS Foods (ckcsweb.com), serves the mussels in big bowls with lots of bread for dipping. Kids love getting a little messy, and even the less-adventurous eaters can be coaxed into dipping a piece of crusty bread into the sauce.  For adults, the dish's exotic flavors are a hit. And for the host, mussels mean only a few minutes in the kitchen - and a small price tag, even when feeding a crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2014
James Gummer is no ordinary drummer. Not only does he perform in an all- percussion show called the Drum Runners, he also will be playing for the jousts and the chess game at this year's Maryland Renaissance Festival, opening Saturday and running through Oct. 19 in Crownsville. "I like working for the Renaissance Festival because there are so many great performers there," said Gummer, 41. "And I feel like I've grown a lot from being around them. " Gummer, a resident of Perry Hall, has been participating in the festival for 17 years and has no intention of stopping any time soon.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
About a dozen schoolchildren at the Willows Apartments in Glen Burnie queued up curbside as the Anne Arundel County school bus pulled up. Some kids were flanked by parents and toddler siblings who appeared just as excited to see the bus; the moment had all the trappings of the first day of school. But that's a few weeks away. Instead, the bus had come with a mainstay for students in the area: healthy meals. School officials opened the rear of the bus and set up tables with some of the same food offered during the school year, feeding not only the schoolchildren but siblings who won't begin classes for a couple of years.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman and Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
When school lets out for the summer, many children lose access to free and reduced-price meals. In the past two weeks, Baltimore County and City both ramped up their efforts to feed these children, who account for eighty-four percent of students in Baltimore City and 47.4 percent in the county. Baltimore City and County are expanding summer programs that feed low-income children, many of whom rely on free and reduced-price meals served at their schools. The county is expanding its program to serve free lunches at four public libraries for the first time.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Those who qualify for free and reduced price lunch in Baltimore City schools - 84 percent of students -- have few options in the summer. But a federally-sponsored program will bring food to many of these kids beginning Tuesday, when Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the Family League will announce goals that include an increase in meals to 1.5 million, up from 1.24 million last summer. As part of the program, Mobile Meals brings food twice a day to young children and teens in underserved areas of the city, and officials are seeking changes to the program to increase the meals to three a day. "There is no excuse for any child in our city to worry where their next meal will come from, and they should never, ever go to bed hungry," said Rawlings-Blake in a statement.
NEWS
By Jonathon Rondeau | June 26, 2014
When school let out for the summer, most of the children in Baltimore who qualify for free and reduced price meals - 84 percent - lost access to the three meals a day they count on during the school year. Struggling families and children turn to community leaders who run summer supplemental programs, like Hattie Bailey, who serves meals at Full Gospel Fellowship Church through the federally-funded Summer Food Service Program (SFSP). But since SFSP only provides two meals per day, Ms. Bailey is unable to serve supper to the children in her program if she serves them breakfast and lunch.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jada Vanderpool and The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Preparing a wedding menu can be tricky. That's why, with a little help from the folks at Rouge Catering in Hunt Valley ( rougecatering.com ) and Chef's Expressions in Timonium ( chefsexpressions.com ), we've made things a bit easier with this list of catering tips for the bride- and groom-to-be. Know what food style you're going for Chef's Expressions recommends that couples give caterers three of their favorite restaurants and their favorite style of food so that they can get a feel for your food style.
NEWS
March 1, 2014
Dan Janssen has eaten pizza for almost every meal for a quarter of a century. Pizza for breakfast. Pizza for lunch. Pizza for dinner. And almost always, it's plain cheese pizza. "I do eat a bowl of Raisin Bran once a week or so if I want to be healthy," said Janssen, 38, of Ellicott City. "But usually it's just pizza and coffee. " Janssen said he ate a normal "meat-and-potatoes" diet when he was growing up, but decided to stop eating meat for ethical reasons when he was a young teenager.
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