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Mea Culpa

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By Kathleen Parker | May 4, 2007
Of all the words spilled during the recent Democratic presidential debate, the most interesting were 27 of Hillary Rodham Clinton's in response to a question about the candidates' biggest mistakes. The New York senator began self-effacingly, saying that her mistakes were too numerous to list, but offered a couple: that whole health care thing. "And, you know, believing the president when he said he would go to the United Nations and put inspectors into Iraq to determine whether they had WMD."
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SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun and The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
In his first public comments since his February arrest following a physical altercation with his now wife, Ravens running back Ray Rice apologized to fans Friday. But most sports columnists felt that Rice should also be sorry for his awkward apology. Eric Edholm, Shutdown Corner blog, Yahoo! Sports : The facts of the case do show that Rice is a first-time offender who had never stepped afoul of the law previously. Team officials have disapproved of his actions but have stood by him for the most part.
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SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | June 5, 1991
Reading time, two minutes: Next time one of those uppity National League types (and were tired of seeing weak-hitting pitchers come to bat. The American League wouldn't go along, so pitchers hit (and put spectators to sleep) for 45 more years.This tidbit is one of the many fascinating facts contained in "The Baseball Chronology," an epic undertaking edited by Jim Charlton. Also, it was on Aug. 31, 1957, that legendary Orioles minor-league flame-thrower Steve Dalkowski turned in one of his classic efforts for Kingsport (Appalachian League)
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 12, 2011
Nobody asked me, but ... do we really need to redevelop Owings Mills Mall into a retail "town center"? How about we just decide that the whole thing was a big mistake, knock it down, tear up all that pavement and turn the area into a park, with exotic things like trees and grass and deer and stuff? How about doing a facelift along Reisterstown Road instead, supporting the small businesses that are already there and encouraging new ones? Anyone for a charrette on this? • People who opposed the Baltimore Grand Prix keep sending me I-told-you-so cards.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1999
Thoroughbred racing returns this week to Maryland after the five-week hiatus for the Colonial Downs season, which concludes tomorrow.On Wednesday, Laurel Park reopens for live racing in the midst of major renovations inside and outside the track. Inside, the most striking change is the closing of the Sports Palace and the addition of numerous simulcast theaters in the clubhouse and grandstand.We'll tell you more about that later this week. For now, suffice it to say that the Maryland Jockey Club has begun fulfilling its commitment to upgrade facilities and revitalize racing in the state.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | November 14, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- During my unplanned work week in Southern California, it dawned on me that Los Angeles and Baltimore have something in common. They don't play professional football here, either. I suppose that was a cheap shot, but it's pretty discouraging when you realize that you're 50 and overweight and you've got a better chance of scoring on the road than the Ravens. Three points? The Ravens celebrated the return of quarterback Kyle Boller by scoring a field goal on their first possession of the game and then apparently decided that being one of the first teams up in next year's draft might not be such a bad thing after all. Of course, this isn't just about Boller, who has played in just two of the team's seven losses.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2004
If baseball fans were expecting a true mea culpa when Pete Rose admitted to betting on his team in the ABC Primetime Thursday interview last night that coincided with the release of his new book, they got something slightly different. It was more like a "Why mea culpa." Rose did, indeed, admit that he bet on the Cincinnati Reds when he was managing the team in 1987 and "88, but that revelation already had been telegraphed and exploited throughout the week to create maxi mum hype for both the interview and the autobiography.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | December 29, 2005
The Ravens announced yesterday that coach Brian Billick will be retained for the 2006 season, ending speculation about his return. If nothing else, next season will be interesting, and possibly a lot of fun. After weeks of evaluating Billick and his coaching staff and interviewing players, the front office has put Billick on a short leash. It wants more humility, sensitivity to others and a new way to control and motivate players. Management wants a Brian Billick Unplugged. You can tell that by Billick's demeanor in recent weeks.
SPORTS
By Bruce Stannard and Bruce Stannard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 2000
AUCKLAND, New Zealand -- As is so often the case in the America's Cup, races are lost on shore just as often as they are won on the water. Sometimes they are lost even before the boats leave the dock. Although mathematically it is still possible for Dennis Conner's Stars and Stripes to make the challenger finals, the International Jury's decision to strip the San Diego contender of one all-important point because of the use of an illegal rudder means it is likely to fall just short of the points required to make the finals.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2002
ASHBURN, Va. - Mea culpa. That's essentially what Washington Redskins coach Steve Spurrier offered yesterday after his team cooked up a stinker of a game in losing, 26-7, to the Jacksonville Jaguars on Sunday. Spurrier, whose offensive wizardry at the University of Florida convinced owner Daniel M. Snyder to hire Spurrier as Washington's fourth coach in three seasons, acknowledged during his weekly news conference that he should've turned to a running game that was averaging 4.3 yards a carry when the passing attack fell apart.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain and Tribune Newspapers | February 20, 2010
Expressing remorse for times when "I didn't think normal rules applied," Tiger Woods apologized Friday to his mother, friends, business associates - and by extension, the world - for the affairs that have put his marriage on the rocks and his illustrious career on indefinite hold. "I know I have bitterly disappointed all of you," he said in a 13 1/2 -minute speech before a private gathering at the TPC Sawgrass clubhouse. "I have made you question who I am and how I could have done the things I did. I'm embarrassed that I put you in this position.
SPORTS
By Jeff Shain and Tribune Newspapers | February 19, 2010
It's the private apology set to bring the sports world - and gossip tabs - to a temporary stop. Shortly before lunch, Tiger Woods will step before a gathering of perhaps three dozen friends and associates at the stately TPC Sawgrass clubhouse in Ponte Vedra Beach, take a deep breath and end a 70-day public silence by apologizing for the scandal that has driven his marriage and his focused career off course. And then, according to reports, golf's No. 1 attraction will disappear again.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | January 12, 2010
This day was probably too long in coming for Mark McGwire, who finally has admitted what everybody pretty much had figured out by the time he made that uncomfortable appearance before the congressional committee investigating steroid use in baseball. We all knew he had bulked up on steroids - it was too obvious - but we needed to hear him admit it and not say it happened just once during a weak moment. Does this mean they'll throw open the doors to the Hall of Fame for him? I doubt that, but I think the admission is sincere, and I think it will improve his chances of eventually reaching Cooperstown.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | May 4, 2007
Of all the words spilled during the recent Democratic presidential debate, the most interesting were 27 of Hillary Rodham Clinton's in response to a question about the candidates' biggest mistakes. The New York senator began self-effacingly, saying that her mistakes were too numerous to list, but offered a couple: that whole health care thing. "And, you know, believing the president when he said he would go to the United Nations and put inspectors into Iraq to determine whether they had WMD."
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | April 13, 2007
WASHINGTON -- I'm an Imus fan and often tune in for headlines, a shot of guyness and a pinch of politics. He's sometimes funny, sometimes smart, and every now and then dumber'n a box o' rocks. As recently, when he referred to the Rutgers University women's basketball team as "nappy-headed hos." It was ridiculously unacceptable, mean and insensitive. But was it unforgivable? Piling on is awfully fashionable at the moment, and while tempting, it's also awfully easy. Let's try something hard.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 26, 2007
This week's version of a light bulb joke: How many sports media columnists does it take to screw up a report on radio ratings? Answer: See picture above. Last week, I said Ravens regular-season games on WBAL (1090 AM) and 98 Rock (WIYY/97.9 FM) in 2006 drew more listeners than the games on JACKfm (WQSR/102.7 FM) and ESPN Radio 1300 (WJFK/1300 AM) in 2005. Which is true. But that may be all I got right. According to numbers compiled by Arbitron, the radio ratings service, WBAL/98 Rock averaged 166,300 Baltimore-area listeners 18 and older for each game.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun and The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
In his first public comments since his February arrest following a physical altercation with his now wife, Ravens running back Ray Rice apologized to fans Friday. But most sports columnists felt that Rice should also be sorry for his awkward apology. Eric Edholm, Shutdown Corner blog, Yahoo! Sports : The facts of the case do show that Rice is a first-time offender who had never stepped afoul of the law previously. Team officials have disapproved of his actions but have stood by him for the most part.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | November 27, 2006
Ray Lewis, the guy Sports Illustrated dubbed "God's Linebacker" in a recent cover story, knelt beside a motionless Ben Roethlisberger during the painful, suspenseful moments after a vicious sack by fellow linebacker Bart Scott in the first half of yesterday's 27-0 victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers. If it looked like Lewis was praying, he was, but he also was begging Roethlisberger to get up. "Ben and I are friends," Lewis said. "Before every game, when we see each other, we touch our hearts.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,sun reporter | September 1, 2006
The voice is one the people of Maryland have heard for generations. The words are a little different. Comptroller William Donald Schaefer - the former Baltimore City councilman, mayor and Maryland governor known for gruffly ordering underlings to "Do it now" and blurting out sometimes impolitic opinions - is on the radio with a new ad acknowledging some of his recent political missteps. "I've also said some things I shouldn't," the 84-year-old says in the 60-second spot airing statewide.
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