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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
The Maryland Department of the Environment has not followed up on at least 900 rental housing units with hazardous lead paint whose owners failed to maintain annual registration with the agency, state auditors have found. In a letter this week to a joint House-Senate committee, the Office of Legislative Audits said that in the past three years the MDE has reduced but not eliminated a backlog of rental housing units that need checking to find out why they are no longer registered as available to tenants with young children.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
About 100 gallons of diesel fuel spilled from a rooftop generator at Bond Street Wharf into the Fells Point harbor Sunday, Maryland environmental officials said. The fuel leaked into the water from a stormwater outfall at Bond Street, Maryland Department of the Environment spokesman Jay Apperson said. Officials believe 75-100 gallons of the red-dyed fuel reached the Patapsco River. MDE's Emergency Response Division contained the spill with a boom, a temporary floating barrier used to contain oil, and used absorbent materials to recover oil from the water, Apperson said.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan | nick.madigan@baltsun.com | March 3, 2010
Acting with what he called "great concern," Gov. Martin O'Malley urged Environment Secretary Shari T. Wilson in a letter Tuesday to "expeditiously and carefully revisit" her agency's decision to allow ExxonMobil to discontinue two elements of the remediation efforts it began in 2006 after a huge gasoline spill in northern Baltimore County. "It is imperative that public confidence is maintained and that regulatory decisions are effectively communicated and understood," O'Malley wrote after reading in The Baltimore Sun about a decision by the Maryland Department of the Environment to allow ExxonMobil to stop monitoring 130 residential groundwater wells in the Jacksonville area and to cease delivering free bottled water to 126 households affected by the underground leak.
NEWS
June 21, 2014
Fortunately for Marylanders, Gov. Martin O'Malley has had the foresight to transition our state toward renewable energy sources for power generation. As a result of the passage of the Off-Shore Wind Bill and the veto of House Bill 1168, an anti-on-land wind bill, Governor O'Malley has established wind power as a viable and significant source of energy for Marylanders in the future. Nevertheless, Maryland now has one of the highest sources of air pollution in the East. The 2014 State of the Air Report released by the American Lung Association rates Baltimore City with the grades of F and D for ozone and fine particle pollution, respectively.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
When it comes to solving its environmental problems, Harford County might be better off without the state environmental agency, said County Councilman Robert S. Wagner, R-District E.That's the belief behind the resolution he introduced at Tuesday's council meeting asking the Maryland General Assembly to abolish the Maryland Department of the Environment.Mr. Wagner's proposal calls for MDE to be abolished "so that the funding dedicated to that department may be allocated to all the counties in the state for management of their environmental programs."
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | March 29, 1992
The Maryland Department of the Environment last week gave Harford's proposed trash recycling plan generally upbeat reviews last week and said approval of the plan should come soon.The department, which must approve the plan before it can take effect, said Harford's "freeenterprise" recycling plan is an "innovative approach" that should allow it to meet state-mandated recycling goals.The comments were made in a March 18 letter from Lori Scozzafava,chief of the Office of Waste Minimization and Recycling at the Maryland Department of the Environment, to Larry Klimovitz, director of administration.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2004
The Maryland Department of the Environment had not inspected South Carroll High School by late yesterday to determine whether it was safe for students and faculty after mercury from a broken barometer was found in a science room last week. MDE officials did not return phone calls requesting an explanation of why the inspection had not been conducted. Environmental contractor AEG Environmental finished the cleanup work yesterday in a science teachers' office, a custodial storage closet, a hallway and a stairway leading to the outside.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | January 8, 1992
The Maryland Department of the Environment has dropped a $2,000 penalty proposed last year against Lehigh Portland Cement Co. for accepting some waste oil with high lead levels."
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | December 18, 2005
Two officials at the Maryland Department of the Environment who hold stock in Constellation Energy played a role in lobbying against an air pollution bill opposed by the power company, raising questions about potential conflict. Victoria L. Schade, the MDE's lobbyist, filed a financial disclosure form in May saying she owned Constellation stock in a mutual fund that would be worth more than $50,000 today. She is a former Constellation corporate contributions coordinator. Mitchell J. McCalmon, deputy director of the MDE's waste management administration, reported in April that he owned Constellation stock that would be worth at least $15,000 today.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | January 18, 2005
Hampstead officials have invited residents to a long-sought meeting with an official of the Maryland Department of the Environment to answer questions and to consider remedies for the presence of the gasoline additive MTBE in wells in a neighborhood just east of town. The meeting has been set for 7 p.m. Jan. 26 at Town Hall, said Town Manager Ken Decker, who sent letters Thursday inviting 40 to 50 area residents. Herbert M. Meade, administrator of the MDE's Waste Management Administration's Oil Control Program, is scheduled to attend.
NEWS
June 17, 2014
Biking and walking are my favorite ways to travel around Baltimore. To be sure I'll make it to work without stopping to wheeze for air, I subscribe to a daily bulletin for air quality reports. Recently, the air quality indicator has been yellow rather than green, and many Baltimoreans can tell the difference - asthma has kept them home from school or made it difficult to work. With summer beginning, Baltimore's smog will only get worse. Four coal plants near Baltimore release pollution that forms smog and contributes to the asthma attacks and other health impacts Baltimore residents are so familiar with.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | April 16, 2014
The Maryland Department of the Environment has categorized the damage done to downtown Columbia's Lake Kittamaqundi by a diesel fuel leak as minimal, even though an estimated 500 to 600 gallons of fuel entered the lake, according to an office spokesperson. Jay Apperson, deputy director for MDE office of communications, said that cleanup of the spill, which occurred at around 4 p.m. on April 14, is expected to last a week, although containment for the spill will remain in place for approximately four weeks.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
The Maryland Department of the Environment has not followed up on at least 900 rental housing units with hazardous lead paint whose owners failed to maintain annual registration with the agency, state auditors have found. In a letter this week to a joint House-Senate committee, the Office of Legislative Audits said that in the past three years the MDE has reduced but not eliminated a backlog of rental housing units that need checking to find out why they are no longer registered as available to tenants with young children.
NEWS
March 12, 2014
In his recent State of the State Address, Gov. Martin O'Malley touted his accomplishments in Chesapeake Bay restoration. On closer examination, the record reveals that his claims were misstatements, at best. The truth is that Maryland's portion of the bay remains severely degraded. Oyster, shad and soft clam fisheries have collapsed, bay grasses declined in 2012 to the lowest levels since 1986, and dead zones proliferate. Did the governor intentionally ignore the increasing reports of people with serious flesh-eating skin infections threatening their limbs and lives because they swam or fished in Maryland's waters?
NEWS
February 6, 2014
In a letter to the editor ( "Md. leads the region in reducing stormwater runoff," Jan. 10), Maryland Department of the Environment Secretary Robert Summers took issue with concerns I expressed earlier in The Sun ("Bay advocates say state lax in monitoring county stormwater controls," Jan. 3). At issue is a program which could halt the loss of 68 miles of Maryland waterways each year and eventually restore 4,600 miles polluted by past growth. The program was established by the 1982 Maryland Stormwater Management Act which Secretary Summers' agency oversees.
NEWS
December 8, 2013
The recent commentary, "Harbor Point environmental questions," (Dec. 2), may lead The Sun's readers to believe that additional studies are necessary before work can begin on the proposed redevelopment there. In fact, these suggested studies have nothing to with the proposed redevelopment, which the authors recognize will be safe. "We are not saying that development of this site will result in meaningful human health and/or ecological risks," the authors state. It also is important to note that the federal consent decree for the cleanup of the former Baltimore Works site mandates that construction not jeopardize the integrity of the remedy and that detailed plans be approved by federal and state agencies.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 17, 2004
Ten employees working for Maryland's Department of Natural Resources will be shifted to the Maryland Department of the Environment next month, officials with the agencies said yesterday. The employees, whose jobs entail reducing pollution from agricultural runoff and other nonsewage sources, are paid by a federal grant. They will report to MDE headquarters in Baltimore on Jan. 10. Three open positions at the DNR will also be shifted to the MDE. Officials with the agencies said the move will streamline pollution controls and that the employees will fit better at the MDE than they do at the Annapolis-based DNR. Employees at the two agencies have been working on similar pollution-control programs.
NEWS
December 8, 1999
The Maryland Department of the Environment will hold a public information meeting next week on the newly designed discharge system at Francis Scott Key High School's idle sewage treatment plant.The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. Dec. 16 in the auditorium of the high school, 3825 Bark Hill Road, Uniontown.The county has applied for a permit from MDE to release an average 17,000 gallons of treated wastewater a day to wetlands bordering a tributary of Wolfpit Branch, about a half-mile south of the high school.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 24, 2013
Environmental groups scored a win last week in their lawsuit contending that Montgomery County's state-mandated plan for curbing polluted runoff is lacking. Montgomery Circuit Court Judge Ronald B. Rubin ordered the Maryland Department of the Environment on Wednesday to revisit the storm-water permit it had issued the county in 2010 requiring reductions in pollution and trash from county streets, parking lots and existing buildings. Environmentalists had challenged the permit , arguing that it violated the Clean Water Act by failing to specify reductions needed in harmful discharges of nutrients, sediment and bacteria into the county's rivers and streams.
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