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By New York Times News Service | August 11, 1995
OKLAHOMA CITY -- Timothy J. McVeigh and Terry L. Nichols, two one-time Army buddies nurturing a hatred for the government, were indicted yesterday by a federal grand jury on charges of blowing up the Oklahoma City federal building in April with a rented truck packed with 4,800 pounds of homemade explosives.The two men, the indictment charged, robbed a gun dealer in Arkansas to help finance their plot, stole dynamite and fuses from a quarry in Kansas, rented a series of storage lockers under false names to hide their preparations, then mixed a deadly brew of ammonium nitrate fertilizer and diesel fuel by a lake in a Kansas park.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 2006
For a long time, the people of Oklahoma City knew it was coming -- the day that Michael J. Fortier would get out of prison after serving time for his role in the 1995 bombing of the federal building that killed 168 people and injured 500. But as Fortier's release tomorrow approaches, the deal cut to secure his testimony against Timothy J. McVeigh and Terry L. Nichols is again gnawing at some of the survivors and relatives of the victims. They worry about a possible future threat posed by Fortier, 37, and the undisclosed terms of his release -- in particular whether he will gain federal witness protection.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The hunt for a wider circle of conspirators in the Oklahoma City bombing heated up again yesterday as federal authorities in Arizona arrested a 35-year-old biochemist who had been sought on unrelated firearms charges, law enforcement officials said.The search for the man, Steven Garrett Colbern of Oxnard, Calif., had been under way for nearly a week but intensified as investigators learned more about him.Mr. Colbern was taken into custody yesterday afternoon in Oatman, Ariz.
FEATURES
June 11, 2005
1509: England's King Henry VIII married Catherine 1509: England's King Henry VIII married Catherine of Aragon. 1776: The Continental Congress formed a committee to draft a Declaration of Independence calling for freedom from Britain. 1919: Sir Barton won the Belmont Stakes, becoming horse racing's first Triple Crown winner. 1977: Seattle Slew won the Belmont Stakes and the Triple Crown. 2001: Timothy McVeigh was executed by injection at the federal prison in Terre Haute, Ind., for the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing that killed 168 people.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | June 10, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A teen-age lad stood here recently at the funeral of a high school friend who had been murdered during a carjacking and shouted tearfully, ''Stop the killing! Please stop the killing!''In thousands of places the world over, as in all of our neighborhoods, that same cry has gone up from the relatives of people killed so needlessly, so wantonly, in so many ways.But this week in a Denver courtroom a different cry is heard: ''Kill him! Execute him!'' Death is the demand for Timothy McVeigh, the convicted bomber of a federal building in Oklahoma City in which 168 people died and some 500 more were injured.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 16, 2001
WASHINGTON -- As a lord high executioner, Uncle Sam is a bust. It's hard to see how even the woodsman who was supposed to snuff out Snow White at the evil queen's orders could have bungled the job any worse than the feds have done with the scheduled execution of convicted Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh. The FBI's failure to disclose a host of documents related to the affair, its tardy delivery to McVeigh's defense lawyers and the consequent delay in his forced trip to the great beyond are only the most recent of the comedy of errors that has marked this unnecessarily hyped episode.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Against the backdrop of an intense struggle between the government and defense over evidence in the case, attorneys for Timothy J. McVeigh asked yesterday that the trial in the Oklahoma City bombing case be put off until after Labor Day to give lawyers more time to build their defense.Stephen Jones, who represents Mr. McVeigh, said that he has suggested moving the trial to Denver if the government agrees by Tuesday. He chose Denver after noting that the new federal judge assigned to the case is from there.
NEWS
By Michael Kazin | June 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In 1992, a decorated Persian Gulf War veteran sent a long list of social grievances to his hometown newspaper: ''Criminals have no fear of punishment. . . . Politicians' . . . yearly salaries are more than an average person will see in a lifetime. . . . The 'American Dream' of the middle class has all but disappeared, substituted with people struggling just to buy next week's groceries.'' He endorsed ''government-sponsored health care'' while asking, ''Should only the rich be allowed to live long?
NEWS
May 5, 2002
William McVeigh Eddy, a World War II veteran and former certified public accountant, died of heart failure at his Reisterstown home Thursday. He was 80. Mr. Eddy was born in Jefferson County, W.Va., where he played baseball for his high school. After he graduated, he entered the Army and served on the front lines in World War II as part of an intelligence unit in Burma. After leaving active duty, Mr. Eddy joined the Army Reserves and served in the Korean War. "He was always proud of having served his country," said Irene Eddy, his wife of nearly 45 years.
NEWS
By Pam Belluck and Pam Belluck,New York Times News Service | May 17, 1995
OKLAHOMA CITY -- Timothy McVeigh has claimed responsibility for the Oklahoma City bombing, according to two people who have talked with him in jail since his arrest.He has told them that the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was chosen as a target because it housed so many government offices and because it was more architecturally vulnerable than other federal buildings, the two people said.Mr. McVeigh has also said he did not know there was a day-care center in the building and was surprised when he learned from newspapers that children had died in the bombing, according to these two people, who spoke on the condition of anonymity.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - The man accused by a conspirator in the Oklahoma City bombing of providing explosives used in the attack denied yesterday that he had any role in the 1995 tragedy and said Terry L. Nichols' attempt to link him to the plot fits the demeanor of someone who "hates everybody." Roger Moore, a longtime gun collector and once a person of interest in the early days of the FBI's investigation, also maintained that he had never heard of or seen the sort of explosives that Nichols recently claimed Moore provided for the bombing.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 4, 2005
WASHINGTON - After a decade of silence, Terry L. Nichols, who was convicted of conspiracy in the Oklahoma City bombing, has accused a third man of being an accomplice who provided some of the explosives used to kill 168 people at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. Nichols, in a letter written from his cell at the government's Supermax prison in Colorado, said Arkansas gun collector Roger Moore donated so-called binary explosives, made up of two components, to bomber Timothy J. McVeigh that were used in Oklahoma City, as well as additional bomb components that recently were found in Nichols' former home in Kansas.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 19, 2005
OKLAHOMA CITY - There will be 168 seconds of silence here this morning, one moment for each person killed in the federal building bombing 10 years ago today. A candlelight vigil was held Sunday, and a marathon, the Run to Remember, is planned for next weekend. Then there is this: a "Day of Truth" rally and speakers forum today and tomorrow, intended to give public airing to the persistent belief among some that the bombing was part of a wider plot, involving other conspirators never caught or brought to justice.
NEWS
February 27, 2005
On February 24, 2005, ANNIE BELLE Mc VEIGH (nee Weatherford) beloved wife of the late John A. Mc Veigh, devoted mother of Anne Weaver, Ellen Mc Veigh and Joan Hayden, loving sister of the late Mary Elizabeth Copeland. Also survived by five grandchildren. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home, of Bel Air, Inc. 610 W. Mac Phail Rd (at Route 24) on Monday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M, where funeral services will be held on Tuesday at 11 A.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 11, 2002
TODAY IS the date that will live in even more infamy than Dec. 7, 1941. At least Pearl Harbor was a military target. Terrorists hijacked four jets, crashed two into New York City's World Trade Center twin towers and one into the Pentagon. Brave Americans apparently forced terrorists in the fourth jet to crash in the woods of Pennsylvania, where all lives were lost. Nearly 3,000 died. Today we remember them and ponder what kind of tribute might be, in Abraham Lincoln's words, most "fitting and proper."
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2002
Officer Beth McVeigh patrols the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries in a small Boston Whaler, fighting crime with a metal ruler. This summer, McVeigh and other Maryland Natural Resources Police officers have been putting the squeeze on crabbers who don't follow a new rule that increased the minimum size for male hard crabs to 5 1/4 inches. More stringent crabbing regulations went into effect Aug. 1 as part of a campaign to leave more crabs in the bay to spawn, with the goal of doubling the bay's depleted crabbing population by the end of next year's season.
NEWS
By Dave McElhatton | June 15, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- The people have judged Timothy J. McVeigh. They have found him to be a murderer.There are those who also see him as a coward; others, as a martyr. History will define McVeigh.As for his being a martyr, however, I don't think so. By definition, a martyr is "one who sacrifices something very important in order to further a cause."McVeigh is a hit-and-run anarchist. Had he stood tall and said, "I did it and I would do it again," had he been willing to give up his life for his beliefs, he would have said so loud and clear.
NEWS
By Abe Novick | April 10, 2001
WHEN TIMOTHY McVeigh looks up on May 16, expecting to see a group of relatives of the victims he blew up, what if no one would be there staring back at him? And what if there wouldn't be any cameras filming the lethal injection, either -- just him alone with his executioner and the required legal witnesses? No audience. No reality TV. No ratings. No hype. If we make a spectacle of someone's death, there is a part of it that smacks of retribution. We become the hateful. The victims' relatives want to see him die, and it's understandable.
NEWS
May 5, 2002
William McVeigh Eddy, a World War II veteran and former certified public accountant, died of heart failure at his Reisterstown home Thursday. He was 80. Mr. Eddy was born in Jefferson County, W.Va., where he played baseball for his high school. After he graduated, he entered the Army and served on the front lines in World War II as part of an intelligence unit in Burma. After leaving active duty, Mr. Eddy joined the Army Reserves and served in the Korean War. "He was always proud of having served his country," said Irene Eddy, his wife of nearly 45 years.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | June 19, 2001
AUSTIN, Texas - "Invictus"?! Lord save us, what a sick man. Talk about delusional. That Timothy McVeigh, mass murderer of children, saw himself as the master of his ship and the captain of his soul is beyond irony. Now he's going to ruin a perfectly good minor poem. To the extent that Timothy McVeigh can be understood - or that we'd want to understand him - he obviously considered himself part of the warrior culture. Warrior mythology is an ancient and in some ways still-noble ideal.
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