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By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1998
Growing up in 1960s Harlem, Irving Pressley McPhail was treated to sweet sounds drifting from Small's Paradise night club while the streets crackled with political insurgency."
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NEWS
July 31, 2007
Patricia D. McPhail, a homemaker and volunteer, died of a stroke Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Ruxton resident was 84. Born Patricia Duffin in Toronto, she moved to Washington during World War II and worked as an administrative assistant in the British Embassy. She moved to Baltimore nearly 60 years ago and was a member of the Baltimore Country Club, the Johns Hopkins Club, the Woman's Club of Roland Park and the Stony Brook Garden Club. She was a Walters Art Museum volunteer and worked at its gift shop.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1999
The final pieces of the new governance of Baltimore County's community colleges fell into place yesterday as Chancellor Irving Pressley McPhail said the three campuses will soon have new presidents.In a memo to the faculty and staff, McPhail said he would recommend the appointment of Andrew Jones as president of the Catonsville campus, Eugenia Proulx at Dundalk and Wayne Branch at Essex. They are expected to be approved by the college system's board of trustees next week."Each of these leaders is a student of the learning-centered philosophy and will bring great energy and vision to our campuses," McPhail said in the statement.
NEWS
By JOE NAWROZKI and JOE NAWROZKI,SUN REPORTER | November 7, 2005
Growing up in an area of Pennsylvania where most men worked in the coal mines, Sandra Kurtinitis seemed bound for the drudgery of a job in a local dress factory. But she had other dreams that would carry her past the mountains surrounding her home in Wilkes-Barre. And last week, as she set out to inject a new spirit into the Community College of Baltimore County, she said she will draw upon her character shaped by her blue-collar upbringing, and the wisdom and people skills culled over 30 years in higher education.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1998
A seemingly innocuous thank-you letter sent by the chancellor of the Community Colleges of Baltimore County to a group of black faculty and staff has drawn criticism from white professors and a rebuke from County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger.The letter -- written by Chancellor Irving Pressley McPhail after an Aug. 19 reception in his honor -- urged those attending to "watch each others' backs." From a book of African proverbs, the letter quoted the passage "the friends of our friends are our friends," and closed by saying, "The Struggle Continues."
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1998
Saying "I accept the challenge," Irving Pressley McPhail was inaugurated as chancellor of the Community College of Baltimore County yesterday.The academic ritual formalized a process that began in February, when the 49-year-old Harlem native was hired to lead the three-campus community college system that has endured questionable management and quarrelsome relations among faculty, staff and the board of trustees. The previous chancellor, Daniel J. LaVista, was fired last year.Speaking to a crowd that filled the auditorium of the Catonsville campus' performing arts center, McPhail promised to turn the community college system into a "learning college" where education is the top priority.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1998
A downtown office worker headed home to Owings Mills steps off the Metro and walks directly to a community college satellite classroom.A high school freshman with dreams of designing a space station enrolls in a college-level computer course in Essex. Technocrats at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s new $300 million cold-rolling steel plant head to Dundalk Community College for the latest training.Irving Pressley McPhail, chancellor of the Community Colleges of Baltimore County, is thinking big about the role of Maryland's largest two-year college system.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2003
Before yesterday, few people knew who Klayton Lipman and Marissa McPhail were. That all changed in less than 20 minutes when Lipman, a senior at Northeast, and McPhail, a sophomore at Arundel, captured individual titles in the Meade Autumn Classic at Blob's Park in Jessup. No. 4 River Hill and No. 3 Bryn Mawr took home the boys and girls team crowns, respectively. Lipman recorded perhaps the most significant win of his career by outrunning McDonogh junior Tristram Thomas and Old Mill senior Larry Contrella over the final 200 yards of the 3-mile course.
NEWS
January 30, 1998
BALTIMORE COUNTY'S troubled community colleges appear to have made a top-notch choice in Irving P. McPhail as chancellor. His credentials -- an Ivy League background with extensive experience leading college systems and a knowledge of local institutions -- are impeccable.Now the question is whether the colleges' board of trustees will grant Dr. McPhail the freedom to lead it down the road to reform.There is reason to think that it will. Much has changed since last year's debacle, when reorganization of the county's three-campus system became mired in a three-way fight between a hostile, inept, control-happy board, a controversial chancellor in Daniel J. LaVista and a disgruntled faculty.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1998
ABOUT 4 P.M. TOMORROW, the Community Colleges of Baltimore County will symbolically drop their "s" and become the Community College of Baltimore County, a single college with three campuses -- Catonsville, Dundalk and Essex.The ceremonial signing of legislation creating the single entity is part of a three-day celebration culminating Saturday in the inauguration of Irving Pressley McPhail as chancellor.McPhail, a 49-year-old former reading specialist, is a big man with a big voice and an equally big challenge.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Lisa Goldberg and Joe Nawrozki and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2005
The Community College of Baltimore County will begin its search for a new chancellor this week amid community and faculty concerns over the system's finances and future. As an 11-member committee is named to oversee a nationwide hunt for a replacement for Irving Pressley McPhail, CCBC's chancellor since 1998, college leaders are facing criticism about spending practices - and apprehension about what effect a $6 million deficit will have on the system's 73,000 students. Some faculty leaders say that morale at the two-year college has plummeted, and they and several Baltimore County councilmen have expressed concerns about the college's spending.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2005
Irving Pressley McPhail, chancellor of Baltimore County's sprawling community college system for the past seven years, announced yesterday that he will leave his job in June. McPhail, 55, said he wants to pursue other opportunities and feels he has accomplished his goals at the 73,000-student Community College of Baltimore County. "I think I have pushed this as far as I can push it," he said. When he took office in 1998, the county's three campuses in Catonsville, Essex and Dundalk had just been merged into a single college and the transition had not been smooth.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2004
Marissa McPhail wanted badly to bounce back in a big way. And so the Arundel junior did, holding off Broadneck sophomore and Anne Arundel County titlist Tait Woodward in the Class 4A East regional cross country championships at Baybrook Park yesterday. McPhail, who placed second to Woodward in the county championships last week, finished in 18 minutes, 40 seconds - one second faster than Woodward. "After the race last week, I just wanted so badly to win something," said McPhail, who plans to run in next Saturday's state meet despite a possible stress fracture in her left foot.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2003
NORTH BETHESDA - For Marissa McPhail, the Georgetown Prep Classic was a reaffirmation. For Tristram Thomas, the cross country meet was a revival. McPhail, a sophomore from Arundel, earned her second consecutive win in a major invitational, while Thomas, a junior from McDonogh, ignored a nagging injury to cruise to victory over the 3.1-mile course at Georgetown Prep yesterday. The No. 4 Severna Park girls squad was the only Baltimore area team to capture a crown. Thomas collected his gold medal in the Division I race, in which he took a lead after the first half-mile that he would not relinquish.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2003
Before yesterday, few people knew who Klayton Lipman and Marissa McPhail were. That all changed in less than 20 minutes when Lipman, a senior at Northeast, and McPhail, a sophomore at Arundel, captured individual titles in the Meade Autumn Classic at Blob's Park in Jessup. No. 4 River Hill and No. 3 Bryn Mawr took home the boys and girls team crowns, respectively. Lipman recorded perhaps the most significant win of his career by outrunning McDonogh junior Tristram Thomas and Old Mill senior Larry Contrella over the final 200 yards of the 3-mile course.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2003
THERE'S a little something for everyone in the long-awaited evaluation of the Community College of Baltimore County by consultant James L. Fisher. For college Chancellor Irving Pressley McPhail, the $22,000 Fisher report is a bouquet. Five years ago, when the school's board of trustees hired McPhail from the St. Louis area, Fisher and colleagues conducted a much more elaborate study, finding CCBC in a state of near chaos. No longer. "In virtually every area that counts," the new report says, "CCBC is better now than it was in 1997."
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2005
Irving Pressley McPhail, chancellor of Baltimore County's sprawling community college system for the past seven years, announced yesterday that he will leave his job in June. McPhail, 55, said he wants to pursue other opportunities and feels he has accomplished his goals at the 73,000-student Community College of Baltimore County. "I think I have pushed this as far as I can push it," he said. When he took office in 1998, the county's three campuses in Catonsville, Essex and Dundalk had just been merged into a single college and the transition had not been smooth.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2003
NORTH BETHESDA - For Marissa McPhail, the Georgetown Prep Classic was a reaffirmation. For Tristram Thomas, the cross country meet was a revival. McPhail, a sophomore from Arundel, earned her second consecutive win in a major invitational, while Thomas, a junior from McDonogh, ignored a nagging injury to cruise to victory over the 3.1-mile course at Georgetown Prep yesterday. The No. 4 Severna Park girls squad was the only Baltimore area team to capture a crown. Thomas collected his gold medal in the Division I race, in which he took a lead after the first half-mile that he would not relinquish.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2002
In an era when higher education leaders switch colleges as often as utility infielders switch baseball teams, the five-year anniversary of a campus executive is not to be taken lightly. And if that's not enough reason for Irving P. McPhail to celebrate his nickel anniversary as chancellor of the Community College of Baltimore County, he also has this: a salary bonus worth an estimated $135,000. When CCBC's board of trustees hired McPhail, 53, away from a community college in St. Louis in 1997, it was so desperate to bring order to the sprawling system that it offered him a year's salary as incentive if he lasted five years on the job. The trustees also hoped the bonus would help keep a chancellor who had four jobs in 10 years before coming to CCBC.
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