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SPORTS
February 7, 2008
Brian McNamee's lawyers said yesterday that they gave federal prosecutors physical evidence backing the personal trainer's allegation that Roger Clemens used performance-enhancing drugs. "I think this is a significant point in the case. We believe that this is significant corroboration," said McNamee's lead lawyer, Earl Ward. McNamee's side turned over syringes with Clemens' blood to Internal Revenue Service Special Agent Jeff Novitzky in early January, a person familiar with the evidence said, speaking to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2012
The Rev. James J. McNamee III, a retired Episcopal priest who had pastored St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Annapolis, died Friday of cancer at his home in the Ambassador Apartments in Tuscany-Canterbury. He was 76. Mr. McNamee was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. "His father was killed during World War II and his mother managed apartment houses," said Dr. John W. Payne, Richey Hospice medical director and a boyhood friend. After graduating from City College in 1953, he studied at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service for two years and spent his junior year abroad at the Sorbonne in Paris.
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BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | August 30, 1991
Roger McNamee, the 35-year-old overseer of one of T. Rowe Price Associates' most successful mutual funds, has left the firm to start his own company in California.The announcement of McNamee's leaving was made to Price employees this week and shareholders will soon be notified by mail, said Steve Norwitz, the firm's spokesman.McNamee oversaw the $163 million Science and Technology Fund, which was ranked as one of the country's best sector funds.Charles "Chip" Morris, 28, who helped McNamee operate the fund, will now become the fund president, Norwitz said.
SPORTS
By From Sun news services | March 12, 2009
Brian McNamee says he injected Roger Clemens with drugs in a hot tub at Yankee Stadium and that among the needles he gave government investigators was one he used to inject the then-star pitcher for the New York Yankees in the summer of 2001 at Clemens' Manhattan apartment, according to the Web site sportsimproper.com. McNamee previously described injecting Clemens at the pitcher's apartment to baseball investigator George Mitchell. In addition, he told the Web site: "Sometimes it was in the Jacuzzi at Yankee Stadium."
SPORTS
January 8, 2008
HOUSTON -- "What do you want me to do?" Brian McNamee asked Roger Clemens again and again. Clemens never gave a clear answer. A recording of Friday's 17-minute telephone call between Clemens' former trainer and the seven-time Cy Young Award winner was played at Clemens' long-awaited news conference yesterday, the first time he faced a group of reporters since McNamee's accusations were made public in the Mitchell Report on Dec. 13. McNamee asked Clemens...
SPORTS
By Ken Davidoff and Jim Baumbach and Ken Davidoff and Jim Baumbach,NEWSDAY | December 14, 2007
NEW YORK -- New York Yankees pitchers Roger Clemens and Andy Pettitte are the most prominent players identified as users of performance-enhancing drugs in the Mitchell Report, which was released yesterday. The most stunning aspect of the report, which was completed by former Sen. George Mitchell, is the great detail with which he goes into Clemens' past, based on eyewitness testimony by the pitcher's longtime trainer, Brian McNamee. Considering how quickly public opinion turned against slugger Mark McGwire, Clemens' Hall of Fame status could be in question.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun reporter | February 14, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Before a packed congressional hearing room, Roger Clemens, one of the best pitchers in baseball history, fought to save his reputation yesterday as he angrily denied using steroids. The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform heard nearly five hours of testimony about - and from - Clemens during a stormy hearing that ended with committee Chairman Henry A. Waxman slamming his gavel and ordering the pitcher not to interrupt his closing statements. Several times, Waxman had to remind Clemens' lawyers that only their client could speak, not them.
SPORTS
February 13, 2008
Baseball Steroid hearings 10 A.M. [CSPAN3, ESPN, COMCAST SPORTSNET] This might get higher ratings than the last World Series. Roger Clemens and his former personal trainer, Brian McNamee, get to tell their versions of reality as it applies to the Rocket's alleged involvement with steroids and human growth hormone. Clemens said he never touched the stuff. McNamee said he personally injected Clemens. College basketball Maryland@Duke 7 P.M. [ESPN] The Terrapins (16-8, 6-3 Atlantic Coast Conference)
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | May 29, 2008
I thought things had gotten a little quiet on the Roger Clemens front. With no women being romantically linked lately to the seven-time Cy Young Award winner, Clemens fired a legal salvo this week at former-personal-trainer-turned-accuser Brian McNamee by adding a charge of "intentional infliction of emotional distress" to the defamation lawsuit Clemens filed against McNamee. And Clemens wants the home-field advantage by having the case heard in Texas. Perhaps that's why there's this reported language in the legal paperwork: "McNamee's false accusations have accomplished their purpose of destroying Clemens' good reputation and making him the subject of scorn and ridicule throughout Texas."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | January 1, 2009
It has been so long, I almost "misremembered" my trip to Washington for the Feb. 13 hearing of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. That was the one at which tarnished idol Roger Clemens traded charges with former personal trainer Brian McNamee and shattered whatever illusions we had left about the national pastime. The Rocket was dragged before Congress and spent about five hours alternately dissembling and declaring his righteous outrage at the claims by McNamee that he (Clemens)
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,peter.schmuck@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
News item: The Orioles open spring workouts today in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Pitchers and catchers reported yesterday. Position players arrive later in the week. My take: If there is strength in numbers, the Orioles will have the best pitching staff in baseball. There are 37 pitchers in camp, most of them with at least an outside chance of making the major league roster. Bonus take: Sorry, but there probably isn't strength in numbers. The starting rotation is expected to be a major weakness.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff and news services | January 17, 2009
McNamee questioned by Clemens prosecutors baseball Roger Clemens' former personal trainer Brian McNamee was questioned for five hours yesterday by federal prosecutors and investigators building a perjury case against the seven-time Cy Young Award winner. McNamee did not speak to reporters, only shaking his head when asked whether he would comment, when he arrived yesterday morning at the U.S. Attorney's office in Washington accompanied by his lawyers, Richard Emery and Earl Ward. McNamee has told federal agents, baseball investigator George Mitchell and a House of Representatives committee that he injected Clemens more than a dozen times with steroids and human growth hormone from 1998 to 2001.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | January 1, 2009
It has been so long, I almost "misremembered" my trip to Washington for the Feb. 13 hearing of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. That was the one at which tarnished idol Roger Clemens traded charges with former personal trainer Brian McNamee and shattered whatever illusions we had left about the national pastime. The Rocket was dragged before Congress and spent about five hours alternately dissembling and declaring his righteous outrage at the claims by McNamee that he (Clemens)
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | May 29, 2008
I thought things had gotten a little quiet on the Roger Clemens front. With no women being romantically linked lately to the seven-time Cy Young Award winner, Clemens fired a legal salvo this week at former-personal-trainer-turned-accuser Brian McNamee by adding a charge of "intentional infliction of emotional distress" to the defamation lawsuit Clemens filed against McNamee. And Clemens wants the home-field advantage by having the case heard in Texas. Perhaps that's why there's this reported language in the legal paperwork: "McNamee's false accusations have accomplished their purpose of destroying Clemens' good reputation and making him the subject of scorn and ridicule throughout Texas."
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | April 29, 2008
The next time you watch American Idol and fantasize about being a big celebrity, go stand in line at your local supermarket and think about how that's working out for whoever is on the cover of this week's edition of the National Enquirer. Or, in the case of soiled superstar Roger Clemens, the front page of yesterday's New York Daily News. You remember "The Rocket." He used to be a baseball hero ... a role model to millions ... the embodiment of the American Dream. Now, he's so tarnished that you could dip him into that miracle silver cleaner they advertise on late-night television and he'd still be stained beyond recognition.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | February 14, 2008
An ESPN poll yesterday showed that folks sitting in front of a computer were inclined to believe the former personal trainer-turned-accuser over the star pitcher by a 2-1 margin. So if those were the people that Roger Clemens was hoping to win over, he wasted a trip to Washington. Oily as he may be, Brian McNamee is simply believed by more people, in part because just about everything else he said about other players has been corroborated. But Clemens did get to make a couple of speeches, courtesy of some sympathetic Congress people, to a national television audience about not taking shortcuts to success and learning from his mother and grandmother the virtue of hard work, and maybe that made it all worth it for him. Another problem is that the one witness whom a couple of members of Congress, including House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform chairman Henry Waxman and Baltimore's Elijah Cummings, gave so much credence to wasn't even there.
SPORTS
By The New York Times | February 12, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Roger Clemens and Brian McNamee will face off at a hearing of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform tomorrow without testimony from two other ballplayers or a steroid distributor who had also been scheduled to testify, the committee announced last night. Clemens, the seven-time Cy Young Award winner, says he never used performance-enhancing drugs. McNamee, the former trainer, says he injected Clemens with steroids and human growth hormone. They will be joined by Charlie Scheeler, a Baltimore lawyer, who led the staff work on the investigation into the use of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball compiled by former Sen. George Mitchell.
SPORTS
February 9, 2008
Brian McNamee told congressional investigators he injected Roger Clemens' wife with human growth hormone as she prepared for a Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition photo session five years ago, the New York Daily News reported yesterday. McNamee testified during his Capitol Hill deposition on Thursday that he injected Debbie Clemens at her husband's direction, the Daily News said on its Web site, citing an unidentified Washington source. Clemens' attorneys did not directly address the accusation when asked.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 14, 2008
WASHINGTON-- --OK, it's all becoming clear now. The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform grilled Roger Clemens and Brian McNamee for nearly five hours yesterday, trying to determine who has been lying and who has been telling the truth in this latest episode of baseball's never-ending steroids soap opera. And now that the "last" congressional steroids hearing is history, I think any reasonable human being would draw the same conclusion: Everybody's lying. The committee members lectured McNamee on his history of misleading authorities and picked apart just about every fact Clemens presented in his own defense.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun reporter | February 14, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Before a packed congressional hearing room, Roger Clemens, one of the best pitchers in baseball history, fought to save his reputation yesterday as he angrily denied using steroids. The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform heard nearly five hours of testimony about - and from - Clemens during a stormy hearing that ended with committee Chairman Henry A. Waxman slamming his gavel and ordering the pitcher not to interrupt his closing statements. Several times, Waxman had to remind Clemens' lawyers that only their client could speak, not them.
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