Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMcmorris
IN THE NEWS

Mcmorris

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2001
Deborah Ann McMorris, a retired Baltimore Department of Social Services training specialist and City Fair volunteer, died March 13 of cancer at Holmes Regional Medical Center in Melbourne, Fla. She was 61. The former Charles Village resident had moved to West Melbourne, Fla., in 1999. During her lengthy career at the social services agency, Miss McMorris trained caseworkers, who determined clients' eligibility for food stamps and medical and cash assistance. She joined the Baltimore Department of Public Welfare in the 1960s.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | August 31, 2006
Mike McMorris' laptop holds an arsenal of musical possibilities. Through his computer and synth setup, McMorris can play drums, bass, guitar and keys, sing and create an endless number of sounds - some he's heard before, and others entirely new. On Saturday, McMorris and the handful of other computer musicians who form the group VALIS (short for Vast Active Laptop Intelligence System), will plug into a P.A. upstairs at the Ottobar and deliver a few hours of live, improvised drum and bass.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | August 31, 2006
Mike McMorris' laptop holds an arsenal of musical possibilities. Through his computer and synth setup, McMorris can play drums, bass, guitar and keys, sing and create an endless number of sounds - some he's heard before, and others entirely new. On Saturday, McMorris and the handful of other computer musicians who form the group VALIS (short for Vast Active Laptop Intelligence System), will plug into a P.A. upstairs at the Ottobar and deliver a few hours of live, improvised drum and bass.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2001
Deborah Ann McMorris, a retired Baltimore Department of Social Services training specialist and City Fair volunteer, died March 13 of cancer at Holmes Regional Medical Center in Melbourne, Fla. She was 61. The former Charles Village resident had moved to West Melbourne, Fla., in 1999. During her lengthy career at the social services agency, Miss McMorris trained caseworkers, who determined clients' eligibility for food stamps and medical and cash assistance. She joined the Baltimore Department of Public Welfare in the 1960s.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1995
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- Once again, the baseball labor talks have moved across the emotional spectrum, this time from hope to despair. Negotiations have deteriorated to the point where it seems unlikely that the 1995 season will be spared the prospect of replacement ball."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | March 5, 1995
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- The euphoria that enveloped the baseball labor negotiations Friday was nowhere in evidence during yesterday's talks, but each side did establish a clear bargaining position -- for better or worse.Union officials cut about $5 million off the luxury tax threshold that they presented to the owners Friday. The owners presented a comprehensive proposal that looked in some ways like the settlement recommended early last month by special mediator William J. Usery, but was not similar enough to keep the union from accusing the owners of backtracking on several key issues.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1998
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Colorado Rockies owner Jerry McMorris said yesterday that the search for a permanent commissioner of baseball could take a significant step forward this summer.McMorris, who heads ownership's commissioner search committee, briefed Major League Baseball's ruling Executive Council last night as the owners began their three-day quarterly meeting at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort.He is believed to be working with a list of candidates that includes at least five names, but indicated that it may be a lot shorter when the owners meet again in June.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | March 2, 1995
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- Three days into the latest round of baseball labor negotiations, the players and owners still are on cordial speaking terms, but another lengthy meeting yesterday succeeded only in raising an obvious question.What's really going on here?The two negotiating teams met for six hours and talked at length about the economic issues that are keeping them apart, but the sense of optimism that surfaced after Tuesday's meetings was not as apparent when the discussions recessed late yesterday afternoon.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | March 4, 1995
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- The baseball labor negotiations cleared an important hurdle yesterday, perhaps putting the two bargaining teams in a position to deal directly with the major economic issues and move closer to a settlement.The Major League Baseball Players Association told the owners yesterday that it will accept management's Fort Lauderdale revenue-sharing plan intact and is willing to make substantial concessions on a luxury tax plan to achieve a settlement.Union director Donald Fehr revealed that the union had proposed a three-year plan early last month that would impose a 25 percent tax on excess payroll over a threshold of $59 million.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1994
NEW YORK -- What's it going to take?The first day of the baseball strike passed without any significant change in the bargaining position of either side -- and there may be many more days just like it -- but the labor dispute that has fractured the 1994 season will end someday. When it does, the terms could look something like this:The players, who currently must wait six years for free agency, would get to enter the free market in half that time but would no longer be entitled to salary arbitration.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1998
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Colorado Rockies owner Jerry McMorris said yesterday that the search for a permanent commissioner of baseball could take a significant step forward this summer.McMorris, who heads ownership's commissioner search committee, briefed Major League Baseball's ruling Executive Council last night as the owners began their three-day quarterly meeting at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort.He is believed to be working with a list of candidates that includes at least five names, but indicated that it may be a lot shorter when the owners meet again in June.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | March 5, 1995
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- The euphoria that enveloped the baseball labor negotiations Friday was nowhere in evidence during yesterday's talks, but each side did establish a clear bargaining position -- for better or worse.Union officials cut about $5 million off the luxury tax threshold that they presented to the owners Friday. The owners presented a comprehensive proposal that looked in some ways like the settlement recommended early last month by special mediator William J. Usery, but was not similar enough to keep the union from accusing the owners of backtracking on several key issues.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | March 4, 1995
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- The baseball labor negotiations cleared an important hurdle yesterday, perhaps putting the two bargaining teams in a position to deal directly with the major economic issues and move closer to a settlement.The Major League Baseball Players Association told the owners yesterday that it will accept management's Fort Lauderdale revenue-sharing plan intact and is willing to make substantial concessions on a luxury tax plan to achieve a settlement.Union director Donald Fehr revealed that the union had proposed a three-year plan early last month that would impose a 25 percent tax on excess payroll over a threshold of $59 million.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1995
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- Once again, the baseball labor talks have moved across the emotional spectrum, this time from hope to despair. Negotiations have deteriorated to the point where it seems unlikely that the 1995 season will be spared the prospect of replacement ball."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | March 2, 1995
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- Three days into the latest round of baseball labor negotiations, the players and owners still are on cordial speaking terms, but another lengthy meeting yesterday succeeded only in raising an obvious question.What's really going on here?The two negotiating teams met for six hours and talked at length about the economic issues that are keeping them apart, but the sense of optimism that surfaced after Tuesday's meetings was not as apparent when the discussions recessed late yesterday afternoon.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1995
Finally, there appears to be some movement in the long-deadlocked baseball negotiations.The second day of intense discussions in Scottsdale, Ariz., ended yesterday with one owner expressing optimism that a settlement is near, even though both sides acknowledged that they have not gotten down to the nuts and bolts of a new labor agreement."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | December 24, 1994
Where does baseball go from here? The owners have implemented their salary cap and the players have promised a legal onslaught heretofore unseen in the history of professional sports, but there still are more questions than answers in the early hours of the game's new economic era.The next few steps are predictable. The union will file a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board, charging that management did not bargain in good faith. The owners will begin the internal transition to a free-market-unfriendly economy that they hope will reverse years of spiraling payroll costs.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | October 7, 1994
The baseball labor negotiations have been stalled for weeks, but there are indications both sides soon will make one final push for a settlement before the owners declare an impasse and unilaterally implement a new player compensation system.In Milwaukee on Wednesday, acting commissioner Bud Selig listened to the joint revenue-sharing plan that was devised by Orioles owner Peter Angelos and agreed to give it further consideration.In Colorado the past two days, players association director Donald Fehr twice met with Rockies owner Jerry McMorris.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | December 24, 1994
Where does baseball go from here? The owners have implemented their salary cap and the players have promised a legal onslaught heretofore unseen in the history of professional sports, but there still are more questions than answers in the early hours of the game's new economic era.The next few steps are predictable. The union will file a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board, charging that management did not bargain in good faith. The owners will begin the internal transition to a free-market-unfriendly economy that they hope will reverse years of spiraling payroll costs.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | October 7, 1994
The baseball labor negotiations have been stalled for weeks, but there are indications both sides soon will make one final push for a settlement before the owners declare an impasse and unilaterally implement a new player compensation system.In Milwaukee on Wednesday, acting commissioner Bud Selig listened to the joint revenue-sharing plan that was devised by Orioles owner Peter Angelos and agreed to give it further consideration.In Colorado the past two days, players association director Donald Fehr twice met with Rockies owner Jerry McMorris.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.