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By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | August 5, 2009
A man who was jailed without bail for months because a Baltimore police officer said he tried to disarm her was set free Tuesday after Officer Traci L. McKissick changed her story during emotional courtroom testimony. Earlier this year, McKissick told prosecutors that Joseph A. Forrest was the man who stepped on her hand as she held a gun and wrestled with Forrest's 61-year-old uncle, who was killed by police during an altercation in February. But in court last week, McKissick referred to the person who tried to get her gun only as the "mystery man" and "the voice."
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NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | August 19, 2009
As the officer in charge of a Howard County police detail at Merriweather Post Pavilion concerts, Capt. John McKissick says that "different bands draw different kinds of crowds." In the case of Phish, often compared to the Grateful Dead, some in the crowd of 20,000 were doing drugs Saturday night, when police made 31 drug-related arrests - the most of any concert in recent memory, McKissick said Tuesday. Four out-of-state men were arrested and charged with drug possession, intent to distribute and possession of paraphernalia, police said.
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NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | August 19, 2009
As the officer in charge of a Howard County police detail at Merriweather Post Pavilion concerts, Capt. John McKissick says that "different bands draw different kinds of crowds." In the case of Phish, often compared to the Grateful Dead, some in the crowd of 20,000 were doing drugs Saturday night, when police made 31 drug-related arrests - the most of any concert in recent memory, McKissick said Tuesday. Four out-of-state men were arrested and charged with drug possession, intent to distribute and possession of paraphernalia, police said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | August 5, 2009
A man who was jailed without bail for months because a Baltimore police officer said he tried to disarm her was set free Tuesday after Officer Traci L. McKissick changed her story during emotional courtroom testimony. Earlier this year, McKissick told prosecutors that Joseph A. Forrest was the man who stepped on her hand as she held a gun and wrestled with Forrest's 61-year-old uncle, who was killed by police during an altercation in February. But in court last week, McKissick referred to the person who tried to get her gun only as the "mystery man" and "the voice."
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | February 27, 1992
In the seven minutes it took an ambulance crew to arrive at Bernice R. Binnon's Columbia townhouse, Howard County police Officer John McKissick was able to breathe life back into a 15-month-old baby."
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1998
Four suspects in the carjacking of a cab driver in Oakland Mills were arrested yesterday morning after a Howard County police sergeant stopped a car for having a burned-out license tag light.About 2 a.m., in the 9500 block of Good Lion Road, a woman passenger left a Columbia Cab's rear door open and three men jumped in and assaulted the driver, said Sgt. Morris Carroll, spokesman for the department. Police said the incident was a set-up robbery.After fending off an attempt to strangle him with a cord, the cab driver, who suffered minor bruises, fled but was quickly tackled, punched and kicked by an attacker, Carroll said.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 12, 2002
LAST FALL was an unsettling time in southern Howard County, to say the least. While residents were reeling, along with the rest of the nation, from the shock of the terrorist attacks Sept. 11, another unthinkable event rocked our community less than two weeks later -- a tornado ripped through the region, leaving a path of destruction through North Laurel and Savage. What residents might not know is that the prompt and efficient response of emergency services that day was orchestrated by a man tucked away in a windowless basement room in the George Howard Building in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | February 17, 2007
One of the region's newest law enforcement gadgets is an all-black, ball-shaped camera that swivels 360 degrees like R2-D2 in Star Wars. The Eye Ball R1 is the size of a softball and is often launched through a window or rolled on the floor to help tactical officers see around corners or behind walls. The camera automatically rights itself when it stops rolling and, day or night, beams back audio and video to a hand-held color screen. Howard County, Montgomery County, Annapolis and Baltimore police own the gadget, which an Israeli-company developed for military use and Remington's Rockville-based technology division brought to the American market last year.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
Tuesday's fatal shooting of a 61-year-old man by Baltimore police was the second time in four years that the same city officer had been overpowered by a suspect who attempted to steal her weapon. Records from the earlier incident show that serious questions were raised about that case. All charges against the suspect were dropped, with prosecutors citing "insufficient evidence" despite the fact that the two victims and key eyewitnesses were city officers. The man's defense attorney also charged that documents related to the case had been "materially changed and rewritten by officers in significant authority in the Eastern District," a claim that is not addressed in the records.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2003
Two Howard County officers accused of assaulting a young man before a 1998 Phish concert at Merriweather Post Pavilion did nothing wrong, and, in fact, it was the man who pushed the officers, a Howard County jury found yesterday. But jurors, who heard testimony over three days this week, awarded no damages to Lt. John McKissick and Officer Michael Proviano, who filed a civil counterclaim against Columbia resident Peter Farragut. "We told [the jury] right up front we ... did not want anything at all. What we wanted was a finding," said Rebecca A. Laws, a senior assistant county solicitor.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | February 20, 2009
Tuesday's fatal shooting of a 61-year-old man by Baltimore police was the second time in four years that the same city officer had been overpowered by a suspect who attempted to steal her weapon. Records from the earlier incident show that serious questions were raised about that case. All charges against the suspect were dropped, with prosecutors citing "insufficient evidence" despite the fact that the two victims and key eyewitnesses were city officers. The man's defense attorney also charged that documents related to the case had been "materially changed and rewritten by officers in significant authority in the Eastern District," a claim that is not addressed in the records.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | February 17, 2007
One of the region's newest law enforcement gadgets is an all-black, ball-shaped camera that swivels 360 degrees like R2-D2 in Star Wars. The Eye Ball R1 is the size of a softball and is often launched through a window or rolled on the floor to help tactical officers see around corners or behind walls. The camera automatically rights itself when it stops rolling and, day or night, beams back audio and video to a hand-held color screen. Howard County, Montgomery County, Annapolis and Baltimore police own the gadget, which an Israeli-company developed for military use and Remington's Rockville-based technology division brought to the American market last year.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2003
Two Howard County officers accused of assaulting a young man before a 1998 Phish concert at Merriweather Post Pavilion did nothing wrong, and, in fact, it was the man who pushed the officers, a Howard County jury found yesterday. But jurors, who heard testimony over three days this week, awarded no damages to Lt. John McKissick and Officer Michael Proviano, who filed a civil counterclaim against Columbia resident Peter Farragut. "We told [the jury] right up front we ... did not want anything at all. What we wanted was a finding," said Rebecca A. Laws, a senior assistant county solicitor.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 12, 2002
LAST FALL was an unsettling time in southern Howard County, to say the least. While residents were reeling, along with the rest of the nation, from the shock of the terrorist attacks Sept. 11, another unthinkable event rocked our community less than two weeks later -- a tornado ripped through the region, leaving a path of destruction through North Laurel and Savage. What residents might not know is that the prompt and efficient response of emergency services that day was orchestrated by a man tucked away in a windowless basement room in the George Howard Building in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1998
Four suspects in the carjacking of a cab driver in Oakland Mills were arrested yesterday morning after a Howard County police sergeant stopped a car for having a burned-out license tag light.About 2 a.m., in the 9500 block of Good Lion Road, a woman passenger left a Columbia Cab's rear door open and three men jumped in and assaulted the driver, said Sgt. Morris Carroll, spokesman for the department. Police said the incident was a set-up robbery.After fending off an attempt to strangle him with a cord, the cab driver, who suffered minor bruises, fled but was quickly tackled, punched and kicked by an attacker, Carroll said.
NEWS
March 17, 1992
Life SavingI would like to congratulate Howard County Officer John McKissick for his quick thinking and prompt action in saving the life of toddler Gregory Williams Jr., who was choking on a piece of hot dog. I would like to thank The Sun for printing this story in a prominent place (Feb. 27), because it brings up two important points:1. Infants, toddlers and pre-schoolers should never eat hot dogs, peanuts or hard raw vegetables -- things that are difficult to chew fully and are the perfect size on which to choke.
NEWS
March 17, 1992
Life SavingI would like to congratulate Howard County Officer John McKissick for his quick thinking and prompt action in saving the life of toddler Gregory Williams Jr., who was choking on a piece of hot dog. I would like to thank The Sun for printing this story in a prominent place (Feb. 27), because it brings up two important points:1. Infants, toddlers and pre-schoolers should never eat hot dogs, peanuts or hard raw vegetables -- things that are difficult to chew fully and are the perfect size on which to choke.
NEWS
May 9, 1991
Today's school children may read of Floyd McKissick or learn about the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) from history books. But during the turbulent 1960s, Mr. McKissick was a daily news event. Time and again, he raised hackles with speeches, led charged-up demonstrators or found new ways to challenge the restrictions of separate and unequal status for blacks.Mr. McKissick, 69, died April 28. At the height of his influence, during the chaotic days of Vietnam war protests, few of his opponents knew he had won a Purple Heart during World War II. He attended North Carolina College, then, represented by Thurgood Marshall, sued to become the first black student at the University of North Carolina law school.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | February 27, 1992
In the seven minutes it took an ambulance crew to arrive at Bernice R. Binnon's Columbia townhouse, Howard County police Officer John McKissick was able to breathe life back into a 15-month-old baby."
NEWS
May 9, 1991
Today's school children may read of Floyd McKissick or learn about the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) from history books. But during the turbulent 1960s, Mr. McKissick was a daily news event. Time and again, he raised hackles with speeches, led charged-up demonstrators or found new ways to challenge the restrictions of separate and unequal status for blacks.Mr. McKissick, 69, died April 28. At the height of his influence, during the chaotic days of Vietnam war protests, few of his opponents knew he had won a Purple Heart during World War II. He attended North Carolina College, then, represented by Thurgood Marshall, sued to become the first black student at the University of North Carolina law school.
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