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NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1995
Marian S. McKew, who owned the Gayety Theater on Baltimore's Block as strip tease and burlesque shows faded into the twilight, died Saturday of cancer at Franklin Square Hospital Center. She was 81.The Block landmark at 405 E. Baltimore St. -- which opened two years after the Great Baltimore Fire in 1904 -- was owned by her father, John H. "Hon" Nickel, a German immigrant who operated the theater from 1914 until his death in 1951.Her father managed the burlesque house in its salad days when featured performers included Phil Silvers, Gypsy Rose Lee, Jackie Gleason and Ann Corio and a young Marian Nickel learned to keep the books while attending the Institute of Notre Dame in downtown Baltimore.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
Former 1st Mariner Bank executive Daniel McKew has landed a job at Baltimore's CFG Community Bank. CFG Community announced Tuesday that McKew will become its president. McKew left 1st Mariner after a year as its president. Previously, McKew served as chief executive of SunTrust Equipment Finance & Leasing Corp. in Towson. CFG Community Bank and its holding company, Capital Funding Bancorp, are operating under a consent order with state and federal bank regulators to shore up their corporate governance and management review processes.
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NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2002
State Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell will get a pay package that could be worth more than $250,000 a year when he takes over the top job at the state Injured Workers Insurance Fund in the next few weeks. IWIF board Chairman Daniel E. McKew formally announced yesterday that Bromwell, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, had been chosen as president of the fund. He said the pay package included a base salary of $175,000, a bonus of 25 percent or more, based on fund performance, a $30,000 car allowance and annual contributions to a retirement plan.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | June 16, 2007
Former Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. was hired this week as a top executive at the Injured Workers Insurance Fund, the quasi-public workers' compensation insurance provider. Curran, 75, was selected for the $125,000-a-year job by IWIF management, which reports to a board of gubernatorial appointees. Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley, Curran's son-in-law, has not yet named any members to the board. Curran had expressed his interest in the top job at IWIF when the agency's former head, Thomas L. Bromwell, was forced to step down to answer a public corruption indictment stemming from his time in the state Senate.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2002
Daniel E. McKew, a businessman who also serves as chairman of the Injured Workers Insurance Fund board of directors, announced yesterday he is running for the 3rd District seat on the Baltimore County Council. McKew ran unsuccessfully for the House of Delegates in 1990 and 1994 as a Democrat, the second time as an ally of state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell. He switched his affiliation to Republican for this race because of GOP dominance in the north county district. That means he will face incumbent T. Bryan McIntire in the September primary.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1999
In the midst of a review by a state task force, a key official of the state Injured Workers Insurance Fund has abruptly resigned, citing personal reasons.IWIF board Chairman Daniel E. McKew said yesterday that Doreen A. Horvath, 39, chief operating officer for the state fund, submitted her resignation last week. The resignation, which gave one week's notice, is effective today.Horvath, who previously was a regional manager for the Travellers Insurance Group, could not be reached to comment.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1999
In the midst of a review by a state task force, a key official of the state Injured Workers Insurance Fund has abruptly resigned citing personal reasons.IWIF board Chairman Daniel E. McKew said yesterday that Doreen A. Horvath, 39, chief operating officer for the state fund, submitted her resignation last week. The resignation, which gave one week's notice, is effective today.Horvath, who previously was a regional manager for the Travellers Insurance Group, could not be reached to comment.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2002
The three candidates for a seat on the Baltimore County Council representing the 3rd District agree that a key issue is controlling development in the county's largest geographic district, but they part ways when talking about how to accomplish it. With no Democrats running in the Sept. 10 primary, one of these three Republicans will win the seat on the council representing the northern part of the county. The incumbent, Councilman T. Bryan McIntire, 72, of Glyndon, a practicing attorney, has represented the 3rd District since 1994.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2000
Thrice spurned by the politically connected, the board of Maryland's Injured Workers' Insurance Fund named an insider with a long background in insurance to the agency's top job yesterday. Preston D. Williams, who has been IWIF's chief financial officer, was made president and chief executive officer. Williams was offered the position over lunch and immediately accepted, according to board chairman Daniel McKew. "He's been doing a great job, and the board felt he deserved this," said McKew, adding that the vote was unanimous.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | February 9, 2006
Common Cause of Maryland called yesterday for former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell Sr., who is fighting public corruption charges, to be sidelined as head of a workers' compensation fund that insures 32,000 businesses in Maryland. "We're not asking that he be fired," said Bobbie Walton, Common Cause's executive director, at a news conference in Annapolis. "When a teacher has been accused of abuse, we ask them to step aside until the trial." The same principle, Walton said, should apply in the case of Bromwell, whose employer described him as a state employee.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | December 27, 2006
Maryland's largest insurance fund for injured employees has severed ties with its embattled leader, agreeing to pay former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell $400,000 to step down before his trial on federal corruption charges. Bromwell, a Baltimore County Democrat, also will receive 18 months of health insurance coverage and the option to buy his company car at market value under a separation agreement announced yesterday by the Injured Workers' Insurance Fund, which Bromwell has overseen as president and CEO since 2002.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | February 9, 2006
Common Cause of Maryland called yesterday for former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell Sr., who is fighting public corruption charges, to be sidelined as head of a workers' compensation fund that insures 32,000 businesses in Maryland. "We're not asking that he be fired," said Bobbie Walton, Common Cause's executive director, at a news conference in Annapolis. "When a teacher has been accused of abuse, we ask them to step aside until the trial." The same principle, Walton said, should apply in the case of Bromwell, whose employer described him as a state employee.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2002
The three candidates for a seat on the Baltimore County Council representing the 3rd District agree that a key issue is controlling development in the county's largest geographic district, but they part ways when talking about how to accomplish it. With no Democrats running in the Sept. 10 primary, one of these three Republicans will win the seat on the council representing the northern part of the county. The incumbent, Councilman T. Bryan McIntire, 72, of Glyndon, a practicing attorney, has represented the 3rd District since 1994.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2002
Daniel E. McKew, a businessman who also serves as chairman of the Injured Workers Insurance Fund board of directors, announced yesterday he is running for the 3rd District seat on the Baltimore County Council. McKew ran unsuccessfully for the House of Delegates in 1990 and 1994 as a Democrat, the second time as an ally of state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell. He switched his affiliation to Republican for this race because of GOP dominance in the north county district. That means he will face incumbent T. Bryan McIntire in the September primary.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2002
State Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell will get a pay package that could be worth more than $250,000 a year when he takes over the top job at the state Injured Workers Insurance Fund in the next few weeks. IWIF board Chairman Daniel E. McKew formally announced yesterday that Bromwell, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, had been chosen as president of the fund. He said the pay package included a base salary of $175,000, a bonus of 25 percent or more, based on fund performance, a $30,000 car allowance and annual contributions to a retirement plan.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2000
Thrice spurned by the politically connected, the board of Maryland's Injured Workers' Insurance Fund named an insider with a long background in insurance to the agency's top job yesterday. Preston D. Williams, who has been IWIF's chief financial officer, was made president and chief executive officer. Williams was offered the position over lunch and immediately accepted, according to board chairman Daniel McKew. "He's been doing a great job, and the board felt he deserved this," said McKew, adding that the vote was unanimous.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | June 16, 2007
Former Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. was hired this week as a top executive at the Injured Workers Insurance Fund, the quasi-public workers' compensation insurance provider. Curran, 75, was selected for the $125,000-a-year job by IWIF management, which reports to a board of gubernatorial appointees. Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley, Curran's son-in-law, has not yet named any members to the board. Curran had expressed his interest in the top job at IWIF when the agency's former head, Thomas L. Bromwell, was forced to step down to answer a public corruption indictment stemming from his time in the state Senate.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | December 27, 2006
Maryland's largest insurance fund for injured employees has severed ties with its embattled leader, agreeing to pay former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell $400,000 to step down before his trial on federal corruption charges. Bromwell, a Baltimore County Democrat, also will receive 18 months of health insurance coverage and the option to buy his company car at market value under a separation agreement announced yesterday by the Injured Workers' Insurance Fund, which Bromwell has overseen as president and CEO since 2002.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Thomas W. Waldron and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2000
In a surprise reversal, state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell turned his back yesterday on a $150,000-a-year job heading a state agency, announcing that he will instead stay in the Senate where he holds the chairmanship of a powerful legislative committee. The Baltimore County Democrat said he decided after several weeks of contemplation to turn down the job of chief executive officer and president of the state Injured Workers Insurance Fund, a position that would have paid him $150,000 plus $50,000 a year in benefits.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Thomas W. Waldron and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2000
Tapping a new leader with legislative skills but little administrative experience, the state's Injured Workers Insurance Fund named Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell yesterday to one of the highest paying jobs in state government. Effective Dec. 1, Bromwell, a Baltimore County Democrat, will give up his seat in the legislature to head the insurance fund that provides workers' compensation coverage to about 20 percent of Maryland's employers. As chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, Bromwell oversaw legislation affecting the agency he is to run. The veteran legislator had been considered a leading candidate to someday become president of the Maryland Senate or to run for Baltimore County executive in 2002.
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