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NEWS
September 21, 2012
It's sad to see a good idea fizzle, and that's what's happened to Occupy Baltimore ("The 1 percent are winning," Sept. 18). But, the movement didn't just "fizzle," it committed suicide. I never pitched a tent in McKeldin Square. However, I did spend time discussing issues, stood with a homemade "Bring Back Glass-Steagall" sign on the corner of Light and Pratt streets and marched in a "Save Post Office Jobs" picket line. Occupy Baltimore's inability to communicate is much to blame for its apparent deterioration.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
An Inner Harbor ice rink is set to open by Nov. 21, and an ongoing fundraising effort will determine how large it will be, according to the Waterfront Partnership. The organization has hired Virginia-based Rink Management Services Corp. to construct and operate a rink at McKeldin Square, said Laurie Schwartz, president of the partnership. It's scheduled to be open through Martin Luther King Jr. weekend in late January. It will bring ice skating back to the Inner Harbor for the first time in about a decade, though at a different location than its longtime home at Rash Field.
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NEWS
December 15, 2011
I am so proud of Baltimore and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. The recent ouster of the Occupy protesters from McKeldin Square was carried out peacefully and calmly ("Occupy Baltimore seeks new goals," Dec. 14). This is in stark contrast to the storm trooper tactics used in other cities. Our mayor and police department are to be congratulated. The protesters behaved well because they were treated respectfully. Too bad Baltimore did not make the national news for handling this situation in a humane manner.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
Appearing on NBC's "Meet the Press" Sunday, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake contrasted her police department's peaceful handling of Occupy Baltimore protesters with the militarized response of police in Ferguson, Mo., where officers fired tear gas and rubber bullets into a crowd.  Rawlings-Blake, who has become a recurring guest on the program, appeared on a panel discussing the civil unrest sweeping in the country after police shot and killed 18-year-old...
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
Baltimore officials have denied a second request by Occupy Baltimore protesters to obtain permits to use in McKeldin Square, the Inner Harbor park where the group has been entrenched since early October. The city "is committed to protecting individuals' right to protest," Recreation and Parks director Gregory Bayor wrote in a letter to the group dated Monday. "However, permanent camping is prohibited in public parks. " The protesters wrote in an application last week that as many as 300 people hoped to stay in the square through April.
NEWS
November 2, 2011
As I write this letter, hundreds of frustrated and angered peoples have uniquely transformed the traditional protest into a massive public sit-in. A display that started in New York has been duplicated all over the nation into the movement known as "Occupy Wall Street. " The frustration and discontent is against governments' inept and lackluster response to the growing economic woes of the nation. Though a legitimate concern and cause, the methods of the protesters are all wrong.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Baltimore officials approved Wednesday a payment of nearly $100,000 to the American Civil Liberties Union to settle a longstanding federal lawsuit over protesters' rights in Baltimore. As part of the settlement, city officials agreed to loosen restrictions on protesting. The new rules allow groups of up to 30 people to protest or pass out fliers without obtaining a permit at all city parks and 10 designated locations, including McKeldin Square by the Inner Harbor. City Solicitor George Nilson, a member of the Board of Estimates, which authorized the deal, also said protesters can now obtain instant permits to hold demonstrations.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
A month after being evicted from a park near the Inner Harbor, members of Occupy Baltimore sought Monday afternoon to establish a five-day encampment at the site of a proposed juvenile detention center in East Baltimore. As Maryland State Police watched, protestors began erecting a plywood structure — painted red and labeled "school" — on the site near the city's complex of jails and prisons. About 50 protestors were at the site by late afternoon. State police at the site would not say whether the five-day encampment would be allowed.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2012
A spray-paint artist arrested last year was found not guilty Friday of peddling without a permit at Baltimore's Inner Harbor, a ruling that left the defendant without an opportunity to argue the free-speech issues he says are at the heart of the case. District Judge George M. Lipman said prosecutors failed to prove their allegations because police officers never saw Mark Chase sell his paintings. In effect, the judge ruled the officers arrested the artist too soon, while he was setting up and before he had made a sale.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
Some are out of work. Some can't afford to visit a doctor. Others are sick of corporate greed. Most blame financial institutions for the tumbling economy. They think the rich are trampling on the poor and middle class and getting away with it. They're fed up, and they're willing to camp out in downtown Baltimore to voice their complaints. Protesters staging Baltimore's version of Occupy Wall Street converged on the Inner Harbor on Tuesday, bringing an array of grievances but one common theme — corporate America and government have bankrupted the country and their pocketbooks.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Baltimore officials approved Wednesday a payment of nearly $100,000 to the American Civil Liberties Union to settle a longstanding federal lawsuit over protesters' rights in Baltimore. As part of the settlement, city officials agreed to loosen restrictions on protesting. The new rules allow groups of up to 30 people to protest or pass out fliers without obtaining a permit at all city parks and 10 designated locations, including McKeldin Square by the Inner Harbor. City Solicitor George Nilson, a member of the Board of Estimates, which authorized the deal, also said protesters can now obtain instant permits to hold demonstrations.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Hundreds of protesters marched through downtown Baltimore on Monday evening to express outrage over the Trayvon Martin case but also to use the teen as a symbol of systemic issues facing the black community in the city and around the country. Several hundred protesters gathered in McKeldin Square next to the Inner Harbor before marching seven blocks to City Hall, shutting down streets during rush-hour traffic. It was the second day of protests in Baltimore after a Florida jury found George Zimmerman not guilty in Martin's death after a trial that captured national attention.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | December 6, 2012
It could have ended badly. Last Saturday, as many as 10,000 people listened while blogger Frank James MacArthur broadcast his stand-off with the Baltimore City Police Department live via Internet radio. The BPD had been trying for more than a week to issue a warrant written in June after Mr. MacArthur allegedly failed to appear at a probation violation hearing related to a 2009 weapons charge. According to his blog, he spent the days leading up to the confrontation on the run, writing, broadcasting, and trying to ensure he could surrender without being harmed.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
It's sad to see a good idea fizzle, and that's what's happened to Occupy Baltimore ("The 1 percent are winning," Sept. 18). But, the movement didn't just "fizzle," it committed suicide. I never pitched a tent in McKeldin Square. However, I did spend time discussing issues, stood with a homemade "Bring Back Glass-Steagall" sign on the corner of Light and Pratt streets and marched in a "Save Post Office Jobs" picket line. Occupy Baltimore's inability to communicate is much to blame for its apparent deterioration.
NEWS
September 18, 2012
WEATHER Heavy rains are forecasted for Tuesday , with a chance they could turn severe with damaging winds and lightning in the afternoon and evening. Temperatures are expected to be between the upper 60s and mid-70s throughout the day. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT State Democrats back LaFerla write-in bid : The Maryland Democratic Party has endorsed the write-in candidacy of Eastern Shore physician John LaFerla in the 1st Congressional District.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2012
A spray-paint artist arrested last year was found not guilty Friday of peddling without a permit at Baltimore's Inner Harbor, a ruling that left the defendant without an opportunity to argue the free-speech issues he says are at the heart of the case. District Judge George M. Lipman said prosecutors failed to prove their allegations because police officers never saw Mark Chase sell his paintings. In effect, the judge ruled the officers arrested the artist too soon, while he was setting up and before he had made a sale.
NEWS
September 18, 2012
WEATHER Heavy rains are forecasted for Tuesday , with a chance they could turn severe with damaging winds and lightning in the afternoon and evening. Temperatures are expected to be between the upper 60s and mid-70s throughout the day. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT State Democrats back LaFerla write-in bid : The Maryland Democratic Party has endorsed the write-in candidacy of Eastern Shore physician John LaFerla in the 1st Congressional District.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
Maryland State Police sought Monday evening to work out a peaceful solution with Occupy Baltimore protesters who were building an encampment at the site of a proposed juvenile detention center in East Baltimore. As troopers watched, several protesters began erecting a plywood structure — painted red and representing a schoolhouse — inside the fenced site at East Madison and Graves streets near the city's complex of jails and prisons. But state police spokesman Greg Shipley said Occupy members were not permitted to erect a structure on the property, which is owned by the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
A month after being evicted from a park near the Inner Harbor, members of Occupy Baltimore sought Monday afternoon to establish a five-day encampment at the site of a proposed juvenile detention center in East Baltimore. As Maryland State Police watched, protestors began erecting a plywood structure — painted red and labeled "school" — on the site near the city's complex of jails and prisons. About 50 protestors were at the site by late afternoon. State police at the site would not say whether the five-day encampment would be allowed.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
Maryland State Police sought Monday evening to work out a peaceful solution with Occupy Baltimore protesters who were building an encampment at the site of a proposed juvenile detention center in East Baltimore. As troopers watched, several protesters began erecting a plywood structure — painted red and representing a schoolhouse — inside the fenced site at East Madison and Graves streets near the city's complex of jails and prisons. But state police spokesman Greg Shipley said Occupy members were not permitted to erect a structure on the property, which is owned by the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
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