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Mckeldin

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NEWS
April 10, 2005
On April 8, 2005 EVELYN E. MCKELDIN (nee Salyers) ; beloved wife of the late George Mckeldin; devoted mother of Deborah Kaya, Charles and Steven Thompson and Julia Wagner; devoted companion of Charles D. Carmine; devoted sister of Wesley Salyers. Also survived by 14 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Family will receive friends at the family owned and operated MCULLY-POLYNIAK FUNERAL HOME P.A., 237 E. Patapsco Avenue (Brooklyn) on Monday, from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services will be held on Tuesday, at 10 A.M. in the Brooklyn Heights United Methodist Church.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
An Inner Harbor ice rink is set to open by Nov. 21, and an ongoing fundraising effort will determine how large it will be, according to the Waterfront Partnership. The organization has hired Virginia-based Rink Management Services Corp. to construct and operate a rink at McKeldin Square, said Laurie Schwartz, president of the partnership. It's scheduled to be open through Martin Luther King Jr. weekend in late January. It will bring ice skating back to the Inner Harbor for the first time in about a decade, though at a different location than its longtime home at Rash Field.
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NEWS
June 8, 2003
On June 3, 2003 MARGARET JUNE of Baltimore beloved wife of the late William F. McKeldin; devoted mother of Richard W. and Bruce F. McKeldin; mother-in-law of Carole H. and Robyn F. McKeldin; sister of Carol Ann Holsey. Also survived by four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Family will receive friends at the family owned and operated McCully-Polyniak Funeral Home, P.A., 3204 Mountain Road (Pasadena) on Saturday and Sunday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral service on Monday at 11 a.m. Interment in Loudon Park Cemetery.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
I'm a practitioner of parkour and the owner of Urban Evolution Baltimore (a parkour gym), and the loss of the McKeldin Fountain from the Inner Harbor would be very unfortunate ("McKeldin Fountain, a threatened Baltimore landmark," July 31). It's rare that architecture in cities is both interesting, beautiful, and usable for traceurs, so gems like McKeldin Fountain are treasured among our community. From the beginning of my practice more than eight years ago, McKeldin Fountain has been an inspiring place.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1996
"With Gov. McKeldin at the throttle of the locomotive, Maryland's delegation to the Republican National Convention left here yesterday afternoon in an eight-car special train for Chicago," reported The Sun in July of 1952.Theodore R. McKeldin, Maryland's favorite son, who had risen from humble circumstances as one of 11 children of a South Baltimore stonecutter-turned-policeman, went right from grammar school to a $20-a month job as an office boy and a part-time job digging graves.He attended Baltimore City College at night and graduated in 1925 from the University of Maryland Law School.
NEWS
September 7, 2006
Charles E. McKeldin, a retired pharmaceutical salesman and woodcarver, died of complications from diabetes Aug. 30 at Pickersgill Retirement Community in Towson. The former longtime Northeast Baltimore resident was 89. Mr. McKeldin, a nephew of the former Baltimore mayor and Maryland governor Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin, was born in the city and raised on Cleveland and Carroll streets. During World War II, he worked as a riveter and machinist at Bethlehem Steel's Fairfield shipyard building Liberty ships while attending night classes at Polytechnic Institute.
NEWS
By William J. Thompson | May 5, 1998
AS ISRAEL marks its 50th anniversary, Americans are reminded of the many contributions made to ensure that nation's success and survival. One key contributor was Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin, who, both before and after his two terms as governor, was mayor of Baltimore.While McKeldin, a liberal Republican and Scots-Irishman, is often recalled as a champion of civil rights for African-Americans and is credited with articulating a vision for the Inner Harbor, less attention is given to his staunch support of Israel.
NEWS
By William J. Thompson | August 12, 2009
This week marks 35 years since the death of Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin, twice mayor of Baltimore and two-term governor of Maryland. The passage of three-and-a-half decades - and more than 40 years since he last held elective office - have, unfortunately, obscured his considerable achievements. McKeldin, who served as mayor from 1943 to 1947, governor from 1951 to 1959, then again as mayor from 1963 to 1967, was a Republican in a state which then - as now - elected few from the GOP to statewide office.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2004
Charles Graham, who has maintained a lifelong interest in Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin, twice Maryland governor (1951-1959) and twice Baltimore mayor (1943-1947 and 1963-1967), called me the other day. He had read a story in The Sun about an $18,000 face-lift scheduled for McKeldin Plaza near Harborplace. He insisted the $3.6 million fountain and plaza at Pratt and Light streets, designed by Wallace, Roberts & Todd in 1981, was named for William Frederick "Podge" McKeldin, a Baltimore police officer and brother of the former mayor and governor.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1999
It was perhaps more than a little ironic that the man who was nearly Dwight D. Eisenhower's vice presidential running mate should die several days after the resignation of the man who had edged him out for the spot on the 1952 Republican ticket.Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin, former governor of Maryland and former mayor of Baltimore, died at his Goodale Road residence in Homeland on Aug. 11, 1974, two days after the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon.Hopes were raised that McKeldin, who had gotten on the Eisenhower bandwagon early during his first term as governor in 1951, might be Ike's running mate in the 1952 presidential election.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
The wonderful McKeldin Fountain at Baltimore's Inner Harbor was running beautifully recently. The site was clean thanks to a team of workers, and there were several families there enjoying this important architectural landmark with its bridges, waterfalls, sculpture and passageways. I can't understand why The Sun is refusing to cover the controversy over losing such an important structure. The city plans to remove this piece of Baltimore history to replace it with nothing but grass.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
Images of nearly 6,000 Baltimoreans are the life's work of a photographer who documented racial segregation and early civil rights protests, and also captured candid moments of now-anonymous brides, classmates, football players and black residents of the city. But while Paul S. Henderson left what Maryland Historical Society curator Jennifer Ferretti calls an "unparalleled visual record of civil rights in Baltimore," he didn't leave behind captions. The names of his subjects aren't known, as Henderson didn't keep written files — or they didn't survive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2011
Tonight's dinner: vegetable stew (vegan, gluten free, contains soy), rice (vegan, gluten free, soy free), fruit salad (vegan, gluten free, soy free), and green salad with avocado and tomatoes (vegan, gluten free, soy free)! Within the first days of Occupy Baltimore, a food committee was formed and most days since the committee of volunteers has prepared meals in the various kitchens around town that have been made available for the volunteers. Don Barton, who works with Baltimore Free Farm, is among the volunteers who prepare dinners for the McKeldin Square occupiers.
NEWS
August 28, 2010
The problem: Why were the trees removed from McKeldin Square? The backstory: Given this summer's brutal temperatures, any scrap of shade seemed precious. That's why Washington Hill resident Joanne Stato contacted The Baltimore Sun to ask about the disappearing berms at McKeldin Square. A reader wrote to Watchdog to ask about the disappearing berms at the plaza, named after former Baltimore mayor and Maryland Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin. Stato bikes to work near the stadiums and noted that the shade trees in this area had been removed and that construction was continuing.
NEWS
By William J. Thompson | August 12, 2009
This week marks 35 years since the death of Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin, twice mayor of Baltimore and two-term governor of Maryland. The passage of three-and-a-half decades - and more than 40 years since he last held elective office - have, unfortunately, obscured his considerable achievements. McKeldin, who served as mayor from 1943 to 1947, governor from 1951 to 1959, then again as mayor from 1963 to 1967, was a Republican in a state which then - as now - elected few from the GOP to statewide office.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | May 25, 2008
The paths from the overlook to the water's edge at McKeldin Rapids are steep, slippery and stitched with tree roots. When it rains, the trails create a sluice of brown ooze that fouls the largest whitewater rapid on the Patapsco River and the fishing hole it empties into. "The rapids are a major attraction. Everyone who comes to the McKeldin Area wants to see them," says Amy Lutsko, a ranger at Patapsco Valley State Park, where the rapids are located. "But it's very nasty, not very safe, not the best of situations."
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,sun reporter | July 10, 2007
Most cities rely on marketing professionals, some on celebrities, but Baltimore could become the first destination to ask regular folks to sell the city. To launch the Visit My Baltimore campaign, city tourism officials will set up a booth at the Inner Harbor where, just for today, people can record videos on what they love about living here.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GENA R. CHATTIN | May 17, 2007
FESTIVAL OF INDIA Celebrate the Indian Festival of Chariots at Baltimore's fifth annual Hare Krishna Rathayatra Chariot Parade downtown Saturday. The parade and the Festival of India will celebrate Indian culture with live music, drama, art and a free vegetarian feast. Parade participants will pull a 30-foot-high chariot down Light Street by hand alongside musicians and dancers until they reach McKeldin Square, where the Festival of India will take place. .................... The parade runs noon-2 p.m. Saturday, beginning at Key Highway and Light Street at the Inner Harbor, and proceeds to McKeldin Square at Pratt and Light streets.
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