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NEWS
December 19, 2008
On December 18, 2008, WILLIAM G.; beloved husband of the late Doris E. McGuigan (nee Kelser); dear father of Tim and Donna McGuigan and Greg and Stephanie McGuigan; grandfather of Timmy and Stacey McGuigan. Friends may call at the Gonce Funeral Service, P.A., 4001 Ritchie Highway on Friday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial in St. Athanasius Church on Saturday at 10 A.M. Interment in Holy Cross Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to St. Athanasius Church.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2011
Ah, baseball, that most perfect of pastimes. Played on a Euclidean field of diamonds and base paths; achieving a near Platonic ideal with its four balls, three strikes and nine innings, and — with its fine and often heartbreaking lines between home run and foul, safe at home or out at the plate — truly deserving of its renown as a game of inches. And come the Orioles home opener on Monday, some fans will get about three more of them. In addition to improving the team over the off-season, the club apparently also had their fans', um, backs: They've installed 18,000 new seats in the upper deck and club level, The Sun's Ed Gunts reported this week, that are about three inches wider than the old ones.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2002
Doris McGuigan, a Brooklyn activist who doggedly fought for environmental protections, died of an apparent heart attack Sunday afternoon while taking a nap at her home. She was 72. Known as one of the Environmental Grandmas, she battled medical waste incinerators, toxic-waste landfills and oil refineries. In 1995, President Bill Clinton commended her environmental advocacy at a ceremony at Fort Armistead overlooking Curtis Bay when he issued an order requiring firms doing business with the government to disclose chemical emissions.
NEWS
December 19, 2008
On December 18, 2008, WILLIAM G.; beloved husband of the late Doris E. McGuigan (nee Kelser); dear father of Tim and Donna McGuigan and Greg and Stephanie McGuigan; grandfather of Timmy and Stacey McGuigan. Friends may call at the Gonce Funeral Service, P.A., 4001 Ritchie Highway on Friday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial in St. Athanasius Church on Saturday at 10 A.M. Interment in Holy Cross Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to St. Athanasius Church.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | September 3, 1991
Janet McGuigan knew at age 4 that there was more to existence than what she could see.She could see the physical universe perfectly through her dark eyes, recalls McGuigan, who lectured Wednesday in Annapolis. But she could see another realm, too, a spiritual world opened to her by her Iroquois grandmother."Everything in life is sacred. Everything is made of a creative force which is pure love energy," says the 54-year-old.McGuigan spoke about this creative force at the Annapolis library as part of a monthly series sponsored by the Annapolis Holistic Health Center.
BUSINESS
By Charles Jaffe and Charles Jaffe,Marketwatch | March 20, 2007
The financial adviser was on the air and on a roll, telling anyone listening why he likes actively managed mutual funds and dislikes index funds. Out came the statistics about how, since the stock market peaked, a large percentage of active funds have beaten their indexed peers. And in listing a few of his favorite funds - including a couple with alarmingly high expense ratios - he brought out the big guns. "Yes," he said as his voice rose to a crescendo, "index funds are much cheaper, but it's the same thing in mutual funds as it is with everything else in life, and I learned from my father 30 years ago that `You get what you pay for.'" Actually, in mutual funds, about the one thing of which you can be certain is that you get what you don't pay for, since the money you don't pay in higher costs stays in your account.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | August 12, 2007
The solid wood beams supporting the new pale green metal roof over the late Nancy Smith's 19th-century Blandair mansion in east Columbia are better than new. "White oak will just last forever, if it's old timber," said Chris McGuigan, the National Park Service's project manager on the $1.6 million restoration project - the first phase of a $14 million project to convert the overgrown farm into a park. That's why the Park Service used wood from old barns - white oak and pine that came from old-growth trees.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | June 6, 1993
Barry Meredith of Baltimore left Indian River Inlet last Wednesday morning on his first real offshore fishing trip. Some 10 hours later, he returned to the docks with a story that will last him a lifetime."
NEWS
May 18, 2002
Marie Aline Martin, a homemaker active in several patriotic organizations, died Wednesday of heart failure at her home in Royal Oak. She was 82. Mrs. Martin, who was known as "Winkie," had lived in Royal Oak on Maryland's Eastern Shore since 1983. Born Marie Aline McGuigan in LaGrange, Ill., she was reared in Montclair, N.J., where she graduated from high school. She earned her associate's degree from National Park Junior College in Forest Glen, and during World War II worked as a claims adjuster in New York City for Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. She was married in 1945 to William G. Martin, a management consultant, who died in 1987.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2011
Ah, baseball, that most perfect of pastimes. Played on a Euclidean field of diamonds and base paths; achieving a near Platonic ideal with its four balls, three strikes and nine innings, and — with its fine and often heartbreaking lines between home run and foul, safe at home or out at the plate — truly deserving of its renown as a game of inches. And come the Orioles home opener on Monday, some fans will get about three more of them. In addition to improving the team over the off-season, the club apparently also had their fans', um, backs: They've installed 18,000 new seats in the upper deck and club level, The Sun's Ed Gunts reported this week, that are about three inches wider than the old ones.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | August 12, 2007
The solid wood beams supporting the new pale green metal roof over the late Nancy Smith's 19th-century Blandair mansion in east Columbia are better than new. "White oak will just last forever, if it's old timber," said Chris McGuigan, the National Park Service's project manager on the $1.6 million restoration project - the first phase of a $14 million project to convert the overgrown farm into a park. That's why the Park Service used wood from old barns - white oak and pine that came from old-growth trees.
BUSINESS
By Charles Jaffe and Charles Jaffe,Marketwatch | March 20, 2007
The financial adviser was on the air and on a roll, telling anyone listening why he likes actively managed mutual funds and dislikes index funds. Out came the statistics about how, since the stock market peaked, a large percentage of active funds have beaten their indexed peers. And in listing a few of his favorite funds - including a couple with alarmingly high expense ratios - he brought out the big guns. "Yes," he said as his voice rose to a crescendo, "index funds are much cheaper, but it's the same thing in mutual funds as it is with everything else in life, and I learned from my father 30 years ago that `You get what you pay for.'" Actually, in mutual funds, about the one thing of which you can be certain is that you get what you don't pay for, since the money you don't pay in higher costs stays in your account.
NEWS
July 6, 2005
On July 4, 2005, ARLENE C. Mc GUIGAN, sister of Betty Stickley and Barbara Vogel; sister-in-law of Arlene Clifton; mother of Jonathan Rubin; also survived by thirty-three nieces and nephews including Tanya Clifton Sheffer and Tara Clifton; godmother of Katelynn Marshall. Predeceased by three brothers and three sisters. Funeral Services will be held at ELINE FUNERAL HOME, 11824 Reisterstown Rd. (at Franklin Blvd) on Saturday at 11 A.M. Interment Evergreen Memorial Gardens. Friends may call Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. and Saturday 10 to 11 A.M.www.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 3, 2004
Few things can be more maddening in a movie than to have events turning continuously on various and sundry dimes; surely, the mark of a weak script (or a lazy scriptwriter) is to have outcomes that hinge on timely happenstance. But the weirdly exhilarating thing about Wicker Park is the reckless abandon with which it embraces the convenience of coincidence, and then the extreme measures it takes to reassure the audience that it's not a movie about coincidence at all, but rather manipulation, obsession, the boundaries of love and the lengths to which the human heart will go to satisfy itself.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2004
As Maryland finds itself on the verge of doing away with the popular Hope scholarships, Colin McGuigan just wants to make one thing clear: if it weren't for his Hope grant, he probably wouldn't be here. McGuigan, a junior at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, was considering transferring to a college in Virginia or Pennsylvania after his freshman year when he won a $3,000 Hope scholarship, an award designed to keep top students from leaving the state. Looking back, he is grateful that the Hope grant persuaded him to stay at UMBC, where he is now happy.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2002
Doris McGuigan, a Brooklyn activist who doggedly fought for environmental protections, died of an apparent heart attack Sunday afternoon while taking a nap at her home. She was 72. Known as one of the Environmental Grandmas, she battled medical waste incinerators, toxic-waste landfills and oil refineries. In 1995, President Bill Clinton commended her environmental advocacy at a ceremony at Fort Armistead overlooking Curtis Bay when he issued an order requiring firms doing business with the government to disclose chemical emissions.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Timothy B. Wheeler and Carl M. Cannon and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writers | August 9, 1995
President Clinton, supplementing his veto strategy with an executive order strategy, used South Baltimore yesterday as a backdrop to hit back at Republicans on the issue of environmental protection.Standing on a pier in Fort Armistead Park overlooking Curtis Bay, Mr. Clinton announced that he had issued an order requiring manufacturers doing business with the government to disclose publicly to affected neighborhoods the amount and type of chemicals released into the water or air.The action was a response to a vote last week by the Republican-controlled House of Representatives that cut the enforcement budget of the Environmental Protection Agency while relaxing standards for the reporting of chemical emissions.
NEWS
May 18, 2002
Marie Aline Martin, a homemaker active in several patriotic organizations, died Wednesday of heart failure at her home in Royal Oak. She was 82. Mrs. Martin, who was known as "Winkie," had lived in Royal Oak on Maryland's Eastern Shore since 1983. Born Marie Aline McGuigan in LaGrange, Ill., she was reared in Montclair, N.J., where she graduated from high school. She earned her associate's degree from National Park Junior College in Forest Glen, and during World War II worked as a claims adjuster in New York City for Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. She was married in 1945 to William G. Martin, a management consultant, who died in 1987.
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