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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 28, 1998
Ruthann Aron's murder-for-hire trial in Montgomery County Circuit Court was postponed yesterday when one juror called in sick and another juror and the lead defense lawyer also reported feeling ill.Judge Paul A. McGuckian, himself battling a virus, sent everyone home.During jury selection, McGuckian increased the number of alternates to six because of the trial's anticipated three-week duration and the possibility of illness. One juror was dismissed in the trial's first day for undisclosed reasons.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- Eileen McGuckian looks out her office window and sees brown concrete. Huge vertical slabs of it.Luckily she can't see in the other direction. Beige brick, and a gruesome hodgepodge of metal and stone.This is the heart of Montgomery County government, a monument, critics say, to building techniques perfected by Josef Stalin.But McGuckian, ever the optimist, sees architecture and history where others see a terrific opportunity for the wrecking ball.For her vision, the Maryland Historical Trust will honor her and Peerless Rockville, the organization she helped found, with its 1999 Preservation Service Award at ceremonies tonight in Easton.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1998
A clearly fatigued jury was sent home yesterday after deliberating for eight hours and failing to reach a verdict in Ruthann Aron's murder-for-hire trial.The 10 women and two men will begin their work again this morning, as the trial enters its second month.Aron, 55, is accused of hiring a hit man to kill her husband and a lawyer. Her defense team has admitted she is guilty of solicitation to commit murder, but contend mental illness prevented her from understanding right from wrong.If the former businesswoman and U.S. Senate candidate is found responsible for her actions, she will go to prison.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Gady A. Epstein and Candus Thomson and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Debbie M. Price contributed to this article | March 31, 1998
One juror's five-day holdout caused a mistrial in Ruthann Aron's murder-for-hire case, upsetting other members of the jury who believe Aron was sane and accountable for her actions.Aron, seated about 15 feet from the jury, was stone-faced as Montgomery County Circuit Judge Paul McGuckian thanked the jury and sent them home. A friend of Aron's seated in the first row of Courtroom 10 began weeping.The millionaire developer and former U.S. Senate candidate left quietly for her Potomac home, where she will remain under house arrest until a retrial, expected later this year.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1998
After almost 20 hours of deliberations, the jury in Ruthann Aron's murder-for-hire trial remains deadlocked.The 10 women and two men received additional instructions from Montgomery County Circuit Judge Paul McGuckian yesterday before being told to report for duty today.McGuckian gently urged them to "step back and look at a problem differently, turn it inside out and take a different perspective."The jurors, who appeared tired and tense Wednesday, seemed more relaxed yesterday. They did not send notes to McGuckian and came out of their deliberation room only for a lunch break.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1997
A Montgomery County circuit judge ruled yesterday that state psychiatrists evaluating Ruthann Aron may ask her any questions they want about her alleged schemes to kill her husband and without her lawyers present.Judge Paul A. McGuckian lifted restrictions in a Sept. 8 order issued by another Montgomery circuit judge that sent Aron to the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center in Jessup for a 60-day evaluation.Judge S. Michael Pincus had granted a request from Aron's lawyers to allow them to be present during the evaluation and to prevent hospital staff from discussing with their client what she did on April 25, the day prosecutors say she fed Dr. Barry Aron a bowl of homemade chili spiked with prescription drugs.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Gady A. Epstein contributed to this article | March 28, 1998
Jurors who had been on the verge of a costly stalemate in Ruthann Aron's murder-for-hire trial signaled yesterday that they may be able to reach a verdict after all."We feel we can make progress toward resolution," the jury said in a note to Montgomery County Circuit Judge Paul McGuckian near the end of its fourth day of deliberation."We are taking a new tack as you suggested."The judge had advised the 10 women and two men on the panel on Thursday to take a step back and look at the trial record "with a new perspective."
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- Eileen McGuckian looks out her office window and sees brown concrete. Huge vertical slabs of it.Luckily she can't see in the other direction. Beige brick, and a gruesome hodgepodge of metal and stone.This is the heart of Montgomery County government, a monument, critics say, to building techniques perfected by Josef Stalin.But McGuckian, ever the optimist, sees architecture and history where others see a terrific opportunity for the wrecking ball.For her vision, the Maryland Historical Trust will honor her and Peerless Rockville, the organization she helped found, with its 1999 Preservation Service Award at ceremonies tonight in Easton.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1998
A last-ditch effort by Ruthann Aron's lawyers yesterday failed to persuade the judge in her murder-for-hire trial to throw out the most damaging evidence: a gun collection and taped conversations with an undercover police officer.Aron, 55, goes on trial tomorrow in Montgomery County Circuit Court on charges she tried to hire a hit man to kill her husband and a Baltimore lawyer. The Potomac developer and unsuccessful candidate for the U.S. Senate has pleaded not criminally responsible to the charges.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1997
Prosecutors said yesterday they may have to drop charges that Ruthann Aron tried to poison her husband unless they are allowed to use evidence gathered in a second case against her.Their comments came as a Montgomery County circuit judge decided that the poisoning case should be tried separately from charges that she attempted to hire a hit man to kill Dr. Barry Aron and a Baltimore lawyer.With a scheduled Oct. 27 trial date drawing near, Judge Paul A. McGuckian heard arguments from Aron's lawyers and prosecutors about scheduling and how evidence from each case would be handled.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Gady A. Epstein contributed to this article | March 28, 1998
Jurors who had been on the verge of a costly stalemate in Ruthann Aron's murder-for-hire trial signaled yesterday that they may be able to reach a verdict after all."We feel we can make progress toward resolution," the jury said in a note to Montgomery County Circuit Judge Paul McGuckian near the end of its fourth day of deliberation."We are taking a new tack as you suggested."The judge had advised the 10 women and two men on the panel on Thursday to take a step back and look at the trial record "with a new perspective."
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1998
After almost 20 hours of deliberations, the jury in Ruthann Aron's murder-for-hire trial remains deadlocked.The 10 women and two men received additional instructions from Montgomery County Circuit Judge Paul McGuckian yesterday before being told to report for duty today.McGuckian gently urged them to "step back and look at a problem differently, turn it inside out and take a different perspective."The jurors, who appeared tired and tense Wednesday, seemed more relaxed yesterday. They did not send notes to McGuckian and came out of their deliberation room only for a lunch break.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1998
After two days of deliberations, the jury in Ruthann Aron's murder-for-hire trial is deadlocked, possibly the first step toward a mistrial.The jurors sent three notes yesterday to Montgomery County Circuit Judge Paul McGuckian, apparently telling him of their inability to reach a unanimous decision.That prompted McGuckian to bring the 10 women and two men back into the courtroom for the reading of the so-called "dynamite charge," a statement that reminds them of their duty and that is intended to move them to a verdict.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1998
A clearly fatigued jury was sent home yesterday after deliberating for eight hours and failing to reach a verdict in Ruthann Aron's murder-for-hire trial.The 10 women and two men will begin their work again this morning, as the trial enters its second month.Aron, 55, is accused of hiring a hit man to kill her husband and a lawyer. Her defense team has admitted she is guilty of solicitation to commit murder, but contend mental illness prevented her from understanding right from wrong.If the former businesswoman and U.S. Senate candidate is found responsible for her actions, she will go to prison.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 28, 1998
Ruthann Aron's murder-for-hire trial in Montgomery County Circuit Court was postponed yesterday when one juror called in sick and another juror and the lead defense lawyer also reported feeling ill.Judge Paul A. McGuckian, himself battling a virus, sent everyone home.During jury selection, McGuckian increased the number of alternates to six because of the trial's anticipated three-week duration and the possibility of illness. One juror was dismissed in the trial's first day for undisclosed reasons.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1998
A last-ditch effort by Ruthann Aron's lawyers yesterday failed to persuade the judge in her murder-for-hire trial to throw out the most damaging evidence: a gun collection and taped conversations with an undercover police officer.Aron, 55, goes on trial tomorrow in Montgomery County Circuit Court on charges she tried to hire a hit man to kill her husband and a Baltimore lawyer. The Potomac developer and unsuccessful candidate for the U.S. Senate has pleaded not criminally responsible to the charges.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1998
After two days of deliberations, the jury in Ruthann Aron's murder-for-hire trial is deadlocked, possibly the first step toward a mistrial.The jurors sent three notes yesterday to Montgomery County Circuit Judge Paul McGuckian, apparently telling him of their inability to reach a unanimous decision.That prompted McGuckian to bring the 10 women and two men back into the courtroom for the reading of the so-called "dynamite charge," a statement that reminds them of their duty and that is intended to move them to a verdict.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1997
Within minutes of her arrest in a conspiracy to kill her husband in June, a distraught Ruthann Aron blurted out "I just cracked," and suggested ruefully that police could end her misery by taking her "out back" and shooting her, a Montgomery County detective testified yesterday.It didn't take long for Aron, a Potomac developer and one-time Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate from Maryland, to grasp the damage she had done in allegedly trying to hire a hit man, Detective Edward Tarney suggested.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1997
Within minutes of her arrest in a conspiracy to kill her husband in June, a distraught Ruthann Aron blurted out "I just cracked," and suggested ruefully that police could end her misery by taking her "out back" and shooting her, a Montgomery County detective testified yesterday.It didn't take long for Aron, a Potomac developer and one-time Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate from Maryland, to grasp the damage she had done in allegedly trying to hire a hit man, Detective Edward Tarney suggested.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1997
Prosecutors said yesterday they may have to drop charges that Ruthann Aron tried to poison her husband unless they are allowed to use evidence gathered in a second case against her.Their comments came as a Montgomery County circuit judge decided that the poisoning case should be tried separately from charges that she attempted to hire a hit man to kill Dr. Barry Aron and a Baltimore lawyer.With a scheduled Oct. 27 trial date drawing near, Judge Paul A. McGuckian heard arguments from Aron's lawyers and prosecutors about scheduling and how evidence from each case would be handled.
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