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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | August 19, 1993
Is "The Last Brother" a first-class dud?Although Joe McGinniss' much-criticized book on Sen. Ted Kennedy recently entered the best-seller list of the New York Times Book Review -- it will be No. 13 for Sunday's nonfiction listings -- its sales have been disappointing, according to local bookstores and some national observers of the book industry."
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 14, 2014
In the history of presidential campaign books, Theodore H. White's "The Making of the President" series in the 1960s set the standard for campaign books to follow. He combined unique access and a sweeping view of the process to help voters judge the candidates and understand the quadrennial exercise as well. Teddy White was a pleasant and avuncular figure who gained that access through a combination of fairness and sympathetic schmoozing. It was once said, disparagingly, that Mr. White was the kind of reporter who could always go back to his sources, meaning he never gave offense to them in what he wrote.
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NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | September 27, 1993
ONE MORE week passes and Joe McGinniss' biography of Sen. Edward Kennedy, "The Last Brother," is still not on Publishers' Weekly's best seller list.Simon & Schuster printed 265,000 copies in anticipation of big sales generated by the controversy the book was expected to generate. Some estimates are that it won't sell a tenth of that printing.The book did stir a controversy, but it backfired and kept sales low. The book has been savaged by almost every critic who read it. Jonathan Yardley of the Washington Post called it the worst book he'd ever reviewed, for example.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen R. Proctor and Stephen R. Proctor,Special to the Sun | July 11, 2004
The Big Horse, by Joe McGinniss. Simon and Schuster. 272 pages. $22.95. Finish Joe McGinniss' The Big Horse and one question pops immediately to mind: Why was this book written? There is, of course, the crass and obvious reason -- that books about horses have been as much in demand as iced tea in August since Laura Hillenbrand's rousing success with Seabiscuit. But within the text of McGinniss' account of a summer at Saratoga -- the grand dame of American race courses -- the answer is not easily found.
BUSINESS
By Julie Kaufmann and Julie Kaufmann,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 30, 1990
John McGinniss is a real estate investor who understands the power of using other people's money to make money.When he buys a house he plans to use as a rental, he puts as little of his own money down as possible. But when it came to the house he shares with his family in Woodbridge, N.J., "I paid it off in five years."Why would someone who knows the rules of the real estate game forgo a tax deduction and a chance to let inflation help pay the mortgage in order to own his home outright?"It's one less thing to worry about," says Mr. McGinniss, 30, who wrote a pamphlet called "How to Save Thousands in Interest on Your Home Mortgage."
NEWS
August 3, 1993
Few books have received such scathing advance reviews as Joe McGinniss' "The Last Brother." The "last brother" is Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, the surviving son of the political clan that has inspired or infuriated this nation for more than three decades.The book has been denounced as more fiction than fact, as cribbed heavily from other authors' works, as a cheap piece of tabloid journalism. Biography of a sort it purports to be. If so, we fervently hope "The Last Brother" is the last "biography" of its ilk.A review of the book as a piece of literature was published yesterday in The Sun. Our concern is over the corruption of journalism that it -- and the much-criticized New Yorker profile of a Freudian psychoanalyst -- represents.
NEWS
By Larry Doyle | July 19, 1993
JOE McGinniss' forthcoming book about Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, "The Last Brother," would hardly be a literary milestone -- just another Kennedy book that won't be on display at the Kennedy Library -- if it weren't for one small thing.As Carolyn K. Reidy, the president of Simon & Schuster, the publisher, delicately put it, "Joe has taken biographer's license to discuss [read: make up] the thoughts that certain people might have had."Mr. McGinniss is more candid: "This is a biography, not a work of journalism."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 16, 1993
Boston. -- "Wouldn't it be nice if it just dropped like a stone?''My friend offers this as a purely wistful thought. The ''it'' we are talking about is ''The Last Brother.'' We are both too well-versed in the ways of the marketplace to expect that a flap about fact, fiction and fairness will result in a debacle at the cash register. Quite the contrary.In the weeks since Joe McGinniss' book on Teddy Kennedy came into view, or at least preview, it's made more of a splash than a thud. First came the disclaimer: ''Some thoughts and dialogue'' were ''created by the author.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 13, 1993
I am not unsympathetic to people who are utter failures.I realize not everyone can be a success, just as not everyone can be handsome, just as not everyone can be me.Which is what I tried to keep in mind as I watched the first week of Chevy Chase's new talk show.As I am not a TV critic, I am under no obligation to review new shows.But when certain debuts go beyond mere failure and enter the range of debacle -- Joe McGinniss' new biography of Ted Kennedy, for instance -- they take on wider societal implications that the rest of us may learn from.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 30, 1993
The latest media feeding frenzy has everyone taking shots at Joe McGinniss' new biography of Teddy Kennedy: "A Graying, Fat Guy Who Still Gets the Babes."Actually the book is called "The Last Brother" and, boy, is it controversial, with McGinniss accused of sloppy research, outright fabrication, stealing from other works on the Kennedys and a total disregard for the truth.Hey, picky, picky, picky.Look, you want facts, go to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, OK?Besides, what kind of a country do we live in where you can't even accuse someone of being a boorish, overweight, drunken philanderer without getting into trouble?
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | September 27, 1993
ONE MORE week passes and Joe McGinniss' biography of Sen. Edward Kennedy, "The Last Brother," is still not on Publishers' Weekly's best seller list.Simon & Schuster printed 265,000 copies in anticipation of big sales generated by the controversy the book was expected to generate. Some estimates are that it won't sell a tenth of that printing.The book did stir a controversy, but it backfired and kept sales low. The book has been savaged by almost every critic who read it. Jonathan Yardley of the Washington Post called it the worst book he'd ever reviewed, for example.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 13, 1993
I am not unsympathetic to people who are utter failures.I realize not everyone can be a success, just as not everyone can be handsome, just as not everyone can be me.Which is what I tried to keep in mind as I watched the first week of Chevy Chase's new talk show.As I am not a TV critic, I am under no obligation to review new shows.But when certain debuts go beyond mere failure and enter the range of debacle -- Joe McGinniss' new biography of Ted Kennedy, for instance -- they take on wider societal implications that the rest of us may learn from.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | August 19, 1993
Is "The Last Brother" a first-class dud?Although Joe McGinniss' much-criticized book on Sen. Ted Kennedy recently entered the best-seller list of the New York Times Book Review -- it will be No. 13 for Sunday's nonfiction listings -- its sales have been disappointing, according to local bookstores and some national observers of the book industry."
NEWS
August 3, 1993
Few books have received such scathing advance reviews as Joe McGinniss' "The Last Brother." The "last brother" is Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, the surviving son of the political clan that has inspired or infuriated this nation for more than three decades.The book has been denounced as more fiction than fact, as cribbed heavily from other authors' works, as a cheap piece of tabloid journalism. Biography of a sort it purports to be. If so, we fervently hope "The Last Brother" is the last "biography" of its ilk.A review of the book as a piece of literature was published yesterday in The Sun. Our concern is over the corruption of journalism that it -- and the much-criticized New Yorker profile of a Freudian psychoanalyst -- represents.
NEWS
By Robert Reno | August 2, 1993
THE body of Kennedy family literature has become so glutted with trash -- from the adoring to the tittering to the scurrilous -- that it is difficult to imagine there is a Kennedy book, screenplay or docudrama left that could be worth a more serious literary debate than is normally provoked by the publication of a new Dell comic.But written one Joe McGinniss has. And surely someone in the publishing industry must now, in gratitude, endow a prize for the most imaginative sales-generating stunt by an author writing on a subject on which he has little original to say. After all, anybody who can invent dialogue can throw together another blockbuster on Princess Diana.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 30, 1993
The latest media feeding frenzy has everyone taking shots at Joe McGinniss' new biography of Teddy Kennedy: "A Graying, Fat Guy Who Still Gets the Babes."Actually the book is called "The Last Brother" and, boy, is it controversial, with McGinniss accused of sloppy research, outright fabrication, stealing from other works on the Kennedys and a total disregard for the truth.Hey, picky, picky, picky.Look, you want facts, go to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, OK?Besides, what kind of a country do we live in where you can't even accuse someone of being a boorish, overweight, drunken philanderer without getting into trouble?
NEWS
By Robert Reno | August 2, 1993
THE body of Kennedy family literature has become so glutted with trash -- from the adoring to the tittering to the scurrilous -- that it is difficult to imagine there is a Kennedy book, screenplay or docudrama left that could be worth a more serious literary debate than is normally provoked by the publication of a new Dell comic.But written one Joe McGinniss has. And surely someone in the publishing industry must now, in gratitude, endow a prize for the most imaginative sales-generating stunt by an author writing on a subject on which he has little original to say. After all, anybody who can invent dialogue can throw together another blockbuster on Princess Diana.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen R. Proctor and Stephen R. Proctor,Special to the Sun | July 11, 2004
The Big Horse, by Joe McGinniss. Simon and Schuster. 272 pages. $22.95. Finish Joe McGinniss' The Big Horse and one question pops immediately to mind: Why was this book written? There is, of course, the crass and obvious reason -- that books about horses have been as much in demand as iced tea in August since Laura Hillenbrand's rousing success with Seabiscuit. But within the text of McGinniss' account of a summer at Saratoga -- the grand dame of American race courses -- the answer is not easily found.
NEWS
By Larry Doyle | July 19, 1993
JOE McGinniss' forthcoming book about Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, "The Last Brother," would hardly be a literary milestone -- just another Kennedy book that won't be on display at the Kennedy Library -- if it weren't for one small thing.As Carolyn K. Reidy, the president of Simon & Schuster, the publisher, delicately put it, "Joe has taken biographer's license to discuss [read: make up] the thoughts that certain people might have had."Mr. McGinniss is more candid: "This is a biography, not a work of journalism."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 16, 1993
Boston. -- "Wouldn't it be nice if it just dropped like a stone?''My friend offers this as a purely wistful thought. The ''it'' we are talking about is ''The Last Brother.'' We are both too well-versed in the ways of the marketplace to expect that a flap about fact, fiction and fairness will result in a debacle at the cash register. Quite the contrary.In the weeks since Joe McGinniss' book on Teddy Kennedy came into view, or at least preview, it's made more of a splash than a thud. First came the disclaimer: ''Some thoughts and dialogue'' were ''created by the author.
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