Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMcgaughey
IN THE NEWS

Mcgaughey

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Colleen Thomas and Chris Korman | May 15, 2013
Much like the nickname “Shug,” Claude R. McGaughey III's plans after college were a mystery to him. McGaughey, who trains Kentucky Derby winner and Preakness favorite Orb, was a student at the University of Mississippi's business school as the Vietnam War was going on and wasn't enjoying it - he was "piddling around," as he called it. Drawing a high draft number in the 1969 draft, McGaughey decided to leave school. The only way his parents would allow him to, though, was if he got a job. McGaughey reached out to a friend who owned several horses at Keeneland in Lexington for work.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Colleen Thomas and The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
Rosie Napravnik will get another shot at history in the Belmont Stakes - just aboard a different horse than in her previous two Triple Crown races. On Thursday, trainer Bob Baffert announced that Napravnik will mount Code West in the Belmont Stakes on June 8 after connections to Mylute decided Wednesday to pull the horse out of the race. Napravnik rode Mylute in the first two jewels of the Triple Crown, finishing fifth in the Kentucky Derby and third in the Preakness. She also rode Code West to victory in the race after the Preakness, finishing comfortably in front of the pack.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | May 1, 1993
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Trainer Shug McGaughey accomplished a rare feat yesterday when he saddled the winners of three graded stakes, including the Kentucky Oaks, on one program at Churchill Downs.In the Oaks, Ogden Mills Phipps' Dispute, ridden by Jerry Bailey, upset the 3-5 favorite, Eliza, who was last year's 2-year-old filly champion.Eliza was considered a possible Kentucky Derby starter against colts until she finished third in the Santa Anita Derby.All three McGaughey horses were ridden by different jockeys and are owned by different McGaughey clients.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Chris Korman and The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
The colt was a knucklehead, really. He had speed and endurance in his pedigree, but if you had polled his owners and his trainer a year ago, none would have predicted that he'd gallop in the same steps as his great-grandsire, 1977 Triple Crown winner Seattle Slew. When the gates dropped on his first race, Orb did not even break. Second race? Same thing. He did not win until the fourth and final race of his two-year-old campaign. But where other colts might level off or become erratic, Orb seemed to get better every day. “I've never seen anything like it,” said his trainer, Claude “Shug” McGaughey, who has been in the thoroughbred game more than 40 years.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1998
HALLANDALE, Fla. -- The mystery of the Florida Derby, and perhaps even the Kentucky Derby, swirls like a twister inside the mind of a strikingly handsome chestnut colt named Coronado's Quest.The horse is so calm around the barn that nearly every afternoon, when his trainer sets out the evening feed, he is lying down. But before a race, once the jockey sits on his back, he sometimes stops, freezes and refuses to move -- until the jockey hops off, and then he won't let the jockey back on.Tantrums follow -- bucking, twisting, burning precious energy.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1998
"We're going in the Preakness."With those words, trainer Shug McGaughey ended days of speculation about whether Coronado's Quest would race in the state of his owner against the best 3-year-olds in the land.Speaking yesterday from his barn at Belmont Park, McGaughey said: "After a lot of days thinking about this, I just thought maybe it's the best place to go. His deportment's been great. I think and hope it will be down there."I think he figures very, very big in the race. I was sort of anxious to give it a try and see what happens.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1998
For Coronado's Quest, the pendulum may be swinging toward the Preakness.Even though his trainer, Shug McGaughey, and owner, Stuart S. Janney III, said yesterday they still haven't decided whether to run the colt Saturday in the second leg of the Triple Crown, signs are pointing Pimlico's way.One, McGaughey worked the colt six furlongs in the slop Friday at Belmont Park. What could that have been except a Preakness work?Two, while McGaughey was at Pimlico yesterday to saddle Draw for the Pimlico Special, he checked the lay of the land, perhaps considering saddling options for Coronado's Quest.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 1998
Coronado's Quest, the early favorite for the Preakness who was scratched from the race because of a foot injury, is not likely to challenge the Triple Crown hopeful Real Quiet in the June 6 Belmont Stakes either, trainer Shug McGaughey said yesterday."
SPORTS
By Newsday | August 11, 1991
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- The news of Meadow Star's withdrawal from the 111th running of the nation's oldest race for 3-year-old fillies brightened Shug McGaughey's morning. "I was not disappointed," he said from behind a smile. Versailles Treaty brightened the trainer's afternoon.Trainer Leroy Jolley elected to scratch Meadow Star from the Alabama yesterday rather than run on a muddy track. And in the absence of the filly who has won 11 of 12 races against females, Versailles Treaty's stock soared at the betting windows.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman and The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
Claude R. “Shug” McGaughey is a man who looks like the embodiment of the nickname that is all anybody calls him by. Short and unassuming, he said this week he made an effort to enjoy the run-up to the Kentucky Derby, a race he has, like any trainer, dreamed of winning. But the Hall of Famer knew, really, that there's only one way to truly enjoy the Kentucky Derby: win it. Running over a sloppy Churchill Downs track that left 19 contenders caked in mud, McGaughey's horse Orb found stable footing and a late lead in the 139th running of the Kentucky Derby today.
SPORTS
By Colleen Thomas and Chris Korman | May 15, 2013
Much like the nickname “Shug,” Claude R. McGaughey III's plans after college were a mystery to him. McGaughey, who trains Kentucky Derby winner and Preakness favorite Orb, was a student at the University of Mississippi's business school as the Vietnam War was going on and wasn't enjoying it - he was "piddling around," as he called it. Drawing a high draft number in the 1969 draft, McGaughey decided to leave school. The only way his parents would allow him to, though, was if he got a job. McGaughey reached out to a friend who owned several horses at Keeneland in Lexington for work.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman and The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
A few low, indecipherable noises escaped from the table where Shug McGaughey, trainer of even-money Preakness favorite Orb, sat during the post-position draw Wednesday. The horse had drawn the dreaded No. 1 gate, meaning eight horses will be closing him in as they race toward the shortest path to the first turn. McGaughey, though, was not among those who thought this meant anything significant. “Some people groaned,” he said. “I didn't groan.” McGaughey acknowledged a preference to start on the outside of the field - where both the jockey and horse can watch the field open up - but said he thought drawing the rail simply didn't matter in a nine-horse field running over a mile and three-sixteenths.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman and The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Orb, the Kentucky Derby winner who will be the favorite to win Saturday's 138th running of the Preakness, rarely enters his stall until he has had time to graze. On Monday afternoon, the strapping colt co-owned by Baltimore County resident Stuart Janney III, had his first taste of Maryland's turf. He walked off a large transport van at about 3:20 p.m., striding past the assembled media toward Pimlico Race Course's Barn E. There, he has been assigned stall number 40, which housed all three Triple Crown winners of the 1970s during their trips to Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman and The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
Claude R. “Shug” McGaughey is a man who looks like the embodiment of the nickname that is all anybody calls him by. Short and unassuming, he said this week he made an effort to enjoy the run-up to the Kentucky Derby, a race he has, like any trainer, dreamed of winning. But the Hall of Famer knew, really, that there's only one way to truly enjoy the Kentucky Derby: win it. Running over a sloppy Churchill Downs track that left 19 contenders caked in mud, McGaughey's horse Orb found stable footing and a late lead in the 139th running of the Kentucky Derby today.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1998
After finishing a game fifth in the Breeders' Cup Classic, Coronado's Quest may race once more before retiring to stud at Claiborne Farm in Kentucky. The Cigar Mile on Nov. 28 at Aqueduct is a strong possibility."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1998
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Coronado's Quest arrived about 6 a.m. yesterday after an all-night plane ride and van excursion from Belmont Park. The 3-year-old colt was the last of the Breeders' Cup Classic contenders to take up residence at Churchill Downs.His trainer, Shug McGaughey, said the decision to compete in the Classic was based on the fact that some 3-year-olds run the race of their lives late in the year, just as some older horses are tailing off.The perfect scenario for Coronado's Quest, he said, would be for Skip Away and Gentlemen to hook up early, and for Coronado's Quest to race at their heels, poised for one late run.Stuart S. Janney III , the Marylander who owns three-quarters of Coronado's Quest, visited the barn.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1998
ELMONT, N.Y. -- The early favorite for Saturday's Preakness should be holed up in a barn at Pimlico, basking in the equine equivalent of superstar status as the buildup continues for the second jewel of horse racing's Triple Crown.But 2-1 Coronado's Quest went through his final workout at Belmont Park yesterday morning and will not arrive in Baltimore until just hours before the race.If that seems highly unusual, it is because Coronado's Quest is a highly unusual horse a horse with an attitude.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1998
After finishing a game fifth in the Breeders' Cup Classic, Coronado's Quest may race once more before retiring to stud at Claiborne Farm in Kentucky. The Cigar Mile on Nov. 28 at Aqueduct is a strong possibility."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1998
OCEANPORT, N.J. -- The striking chestnut colt pranced into the paddock beneath the grand European fern leaf and American purple leaf beech trees. Like a new penny, his coat glistened in the sunlight of the Jersey shore.Eyes wide and alert, he glanced at a woman in a black dress outside the fence. He snapped his head back and looked straight ahead toward the oak saddling stall, into which he stepped willingly, stood quietly and after a few minutes exited peaceably.This was Coronado's Quest, the transformed version -- at least that's what the colt's trainer Shug McGaughey and owner Stuart S. Janney III hope.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 1998
Coronado's Quest, the early favorite for the Preakness who was scratched from the race because of a foot injury, is not likely to challenge the Triple Crown hopeful Real Quiet in the June 6 Belmont Stakes either, trainer Shug McGaughey said yesterday."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.