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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | February 14, 1999
Mission: To provide temporary housing for families of critically ill children being treated at Baltimore-area hospitals and to make grants available to other nonprofit programs in Maryland that help children reach their fullest potential. Grants are awarded with money generated by McDonald's. The Ronald McDonald House on Lexington Street, which opened in 1982, provides housing and support for an optional $10 daily donation to an average of 1,500 families annually. In addition to 39 bedrooms, the facility features a playroom, game room, fitness room, library with computers, children's media entertainment room, two large living rooms, six fully equipped kitchens, two large dining rooms, laundry facilities and an enclosed play yard.
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EXPLORE
July 29, 2013
The Senior Bingo Group from the Rising Sun McDonald's gathers in front of the Ronald McDonald House in Baltimore on July 8 after presenting the charity with a $300 check.
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NEWS
By Keith Paul | June 24, 1991
Five-year-old Michael Sancilio stood in front of the television set yesterday, gently smacking its side as he stared into its flashing blue screen, trying to get the attached Nintendo game to work.He acted like he was at home -- and in a way he was.For eight months of the past year, Michael and his mother have stayed at 635 W. Lexington St. -- the Baltimore Ronald McDonald House -- while he undergoes treatment for leukemia at Johns Hopkins Hospital.Yesterday, the house had a homecoming party for Michael and the house's other residents, volunteers, board members and contributors.
EXPLORE
July 19, 2013
On Monday, July 8, a group of 15 seniors from Conowingo, Rising Sun and Port Deposit traveled to Baltimore to visit the Ronald McDonald House on Lexington Street. The group, formed in 2006, meets every Monday morning - rain or shine - at the Rising Sun McDonald's to play bingo. The players pay $1 per card and they play for two hours, from 9 a.m. until 11 a.m. each Monday. Current chief, Susie Pruitt, collects the money each week and when the tally reaches $300, Susie sends a check down to the Baltimore Ronald McDonald House.
NEWS
July 24, 2005
The Clemens Crossing Cyclones, a member team of the Columbia Neighborhood Swim League, raised more than $2,580 for Ronald McDonald House in Baltimore by swimming more than 75 miles (5,602 laps) at its swimming event July 9. The Ronald McDonald House is a residence for children who come to Baltimore for medical treatment and their families. Erin Forest, 14, was the top female swimmer, with 274 laps, and Nick Gorbitz, 12, and Matt Fitzenreiter, 13, led the boys with 300 laps each. In all, 21 girls and 35 boys swam in the all-night noncompetitive event at the pool.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2004
What was it W.C. Fields once said? "Never act with children or animals. You can't win." Unless you're Baltimore's Ronald McDonald House. The house recently had its annual gala at the Marriott Waterfront Hotel, and some of the guests are still talking about how four children stole the show. They had spent time at the Ronald McDonald House with their families while being treated at Baltimore area hospitals for serious illnesses. Rachael Joyce, Montague Totten and Jade Shapiro all shared emceeing duties with former Baltimore Colt and big Ronald McDonald House supporter Joe Ehrmann.
NEWS
By Ilene Hollin and Ilene Hollin,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2004
Twin sisters, one with a brace on her leg, were able to swing beside each other yesterday for the first time this summer. Children and families of the Ronald McDonald House on West Lexington Street celebrated last night at the opening of a long-awaited playground accessible to disabled children. The 6,500-square-foot area features a swing set with two traditional swings and two swings for disabled children; a red-and-blue combination of slides, mirrors and monkey bars; a child-size rock-climbing wall; a half-court basketball court; and picnic tables and benches.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer HVB | April 10, 1992
Operators of the Baltimore Ronald McDonald House, a home away from home for families of sick children receiving medical care in local hospitals, are seeking funds to expand it.Tom Sullivan, president of the local, non-profit organization that owns and operates the house at 635 W. Lexington St., said the group needs to raise about $700,000 to help pay for construction of a three-story, $1.2 million addition that would be complete by April 1993. The rest of the construction funds will come from an endowment built up over the past decade.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
A thief strode into the Ronald McDonald House in Baltimore over the weekend and stole about $1,000 in video game equipment used by children being treated for serious illnesses at local hospitals, city police said yesterday. For sick children and their families, Ronald McDonald Houses are a haven. For that reason, the theft Saturday morning went beyond the loss of the games, according to police and Marianne Rowan-Braun, the house's executive director. "It's just unconscionable," Rowan-Braun said.
NEWS
By Dan Harsha and Dan Harsha,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
Fighting cancer is never easy. For Jay Barnett, a 14-year-old cancer patient from Glen Burnie, the battle is even harder because he's hundreds of miles from home. Paying tribute to Jay's determined struggle against cancer, New York Rangers defenseman Brian Leetch will name him honorary team captain at the Ronald McDonald House of New York's Ninth Annual Skate with the Greats Wednesday at Rockefeller Center's ice rink. Jay has been living at Ronald McDonald House in New York City for the past year while undergoing treatment at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center there for neuroblastoma, a rare and aggressive form of cancer that attacks the body's nervous system.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2012
Baltimore's Ronald McDonald House put out a call for help and ended up with a brigade of mattress movers. "We need bodies," wrote Sandy Pagnotti, executive director of the West Lexington Street facility that provides housing to families with critically ill children undergoing treatment in five area hospitals. Her email said nothing about heavy lifting, multiple flights of steps or truckloads of mattresses. But her simple plea worked. "I had 70 men on the doorstep at 8 a.m.," she said.
EXPLORE
June 28, 2012
The 2012 Fallston Lacrosse Lightning B-Team played the season for more than wins, championships or personal achievement. The team's coaches, Jeff Blum, Bob Deim and Hank Keeney, implemented "Cash for Stats," and with support from the parents, a small monetary value was assigned to each ground ball, assist and goal during the course of the season. The idea was to raise money through "Cash for Stats" and donate to a worthy charity. The coaches decided on the Ronald McDonald House and from the first ground ball to the last, they were playing for more than just themselves.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2011
Twelve people at the Ronald McDonald House near the University of Maryland Medical Center have been taken to area hospitals with nausea, a fire spokesman said Wednesday night. Nine adults and three children at the facility located at 635 W. Lexington St. fell ill, said Captain Roman Clark. He could not describe the illness beyond saying that the individuals all felt nauseous and that the sickness was not life threatening. Paramedics responded to a call around 8:30 p.m., he said.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | November 30, 2008
Murder and mayhem were Matt Jablow's bread and butter as a WBAL newsman, Baltimore police spokesman and America's Most Wanted producer. Now he's offering more life-affirming fare as a "Webumentarian." Jablow left America's Most Wanted in July to start a video production company, Frodo Productions, named for a Hobbit. Baltimore's Ronald McDonald House has hired him to make a documentary for its Web site - a "Webumentary," as Jablow put it - on a family it serves.
NEWS
By MARY SCOTT and MARY SCOTT,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Many high school students spend their free time after classes doing homework, relaxing or perhaps working a part-time job. But Hannah Pryor, a sophomore at Towson High School, spends her spare time teaching kids through skits how to handle stressful situations. Danielle Chazen and Gaby Roffe, juniors at Beth Tfiloh Community High School, like to teach hip-hop dance at elementary schools. They are just three of 20 high school students who make up the Commitment to Service Initiative, a new volunteer program that enables teens to go above and beyond the Maryland Service Learning graduation requirement by creating service projects.
NEWS
July 24, 2005
The Clemens Crossing Cyclones, a member team of the Columbia Neighborhood Swim League, raised more than $2,580 for Ronald McDonald House in Baltimore by swimming more than 75 miles (5,602 laps) at its swimming event July 9. The Ronald McDonald House is a residence for children who come to Baltimore for medical treatment and their families. Erin Forest, 14, was the top female swimmer, with 274 laps, and Nick Gorbitz, 12, and Matt Fitzenreiter, 13, led the boys with 300 laps each. In all, 21 girls and 35 boys swam in the all-night noncompetitive event at the pool.
NEWS
October 30, 1995
Russ Country Gardens and Gifts of Taylorsville will participate in the "Homes for the Holidays" decorating event to raise money for the Baltimore Ronald McDonald House, through Nov. 6.The event is sponsored by Department 56 and Olympic figure-skating champion Dorothy Hamill.The Russ shop will offer holiday gift and decorating ideas and fund-raising activities during the event.A Department 56 village animated skating pond signed by Ms. Hamill will be auctioned. Department 56's new "Start a Tradition Set," including lighted shops from the Dickens' Village series, will be available.
FEATURES
By Excerpted from In Health Magazine Distributed by Universal Press Syndicate | January 15, 1991
IF YOUR CHILD must be hospitalized and you have a choice of hospitals, you may want to see which offer:* Pre-hospitalization tours or other orientation programs* A Child Life department* Unlimited parental visits* Visiting privileges for siblings* Permission for parents to be with a child during anesthesia* Support groups or other psychological services for children* Arrangements for parents who want to stay overnight.If your hospital does not provide accommodations, see if it has a Ronald McDonald House.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2005
Jay Barnett, who strove to become an Eagle Scout despite fighting a rare form of cancer, died of his condition Wednesday at his Ferndale home. He was 17. Born in Annapolis and raised in Ferndale, Jay was a graduate of Hilltop Elementary School in Glen Burnie. While a pupil at Glendale Middle School in 2002, he was diagnosed with neuroblastoma, a rare and aggressive form of cancer that attacks the nervous system. A member of Boy Scout Troop 447 in Linthicum, he was working to become an Eagle Scout at the time of his death.
NEWS
By Ilene Hollin and Ilene Hollin,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2004
Twin sisters, one with a brace on her leg, were able to swing beside each other yesterday for the first time this summer. Children and families of the Ronald McDonald House on West Lexington Street celebrated last night at the opening of a long-awaited playground accessible to disabled children. The 6,500-square-foot area features a swing set with two traditional swings and two swings for disabled children; a red-and-blue combination of slides, mirrors and monkey bars; a child-size rock-climbing wall; a half-court basketball court; and picnic tables and benches.
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