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NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 20, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The announced resignation of House Speaker-designate Robert L. Livingston sent shock waves through Capitol Hill yesterday, forcing the nation's political establishment to confront just how dangerous a wave of sexual recrimination has become."
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NEWS
February 27, 2014
Bridget Kustin slandered the late Professor Arthur O. Lovejoy when she wrote that he "embraced McCarthyism" ( "JHU's academic 'freedom,'" Feb. 25). He did not. I speak as a student activist at Johns Hopkins University during the McCarthy years. Many students and faculty spoke out to defend Owen Lattimore from U.S. Sen. Joseph McCarthy's attacks. Professor Lovejoy was elderly and reticent in those years (the early 1950s), but he was definitely on our pro-Lattimore side. Ms. Kustin is identified as a Ph.D.
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NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | March 13, 1998
IN the wake of the death of Fred Friendly this month, many commentators proudly recalled his and Edward R. Murrow's 1954 "See It Now" broadcast attacking Sen. Joseph McCarthy for his cruel demagogy on the Communists-in-government issue.It was an influential program, but Murrow and Friendly were journalistic johnnies-come-lately to exposing McCarthy and his recklessness. First were those ink-stained wretches who wrote for daily newspapers. The two earliest and most relentlessly effective were Phil Potter of The Sun and Murrey Marder of the Washington Post.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 22, 2013
In the wake of President Obama's emphatic victory over the ultraconservatives determined to kill his Affordable Care Act, he has as much interest as moderate Republicans do in seeing these ideological zealots cut down to size. Mr. Obama has wisely restrained himself from gloating, declaring a bit ingenuously that there was no "winner" in ending the most recent government shutdown. Still, his firm stand against his foes' attempt to hold him hostage over it was vindicated. It served notice that he's learned the lesson of his earlier disinclination to hold his ground.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | June 20, 1994
DAN RATHER said last Wednesday that America was "trembling" in fear of Sen. Joe McCarthy in March of 1954, and that Edward R. Murrow's criticism of him that month did him in, or at least greatly helped do him in.The Murrow broadcast was terrific, but if America ever trembled at Joe McCarthy, it was much earlier than 1954.Joe McCarthy was a Republican senator from Wisconsin who found a Red under every bed in Washington, beginning in 1948. He was so thoroughly irresponsible and loathsome that even so cautious, conservative and Republican-leaning a newspaper as The Sun of those days consistently and repeatedly criticized him sharply -- beginning four years before the Murrow broadcast.
NEWS
February 27, 2014
Bridget Kustin slandered the late Professor Arthur O. Lovejoy when she wrote that he "embraced McCarthyism" ( "JHU's academic 'freedom,'" Feb. 25). He did not. I speak as a student activist at Johns Hopkins University during the McCarthy years. Many students and faculty spoke out to defend Owen Lattimore from U.S. Sen. Joseph McCarthy's attacks. Professor Lovejoy was elderly and reticent in those years (the early 1950s), but he was definitely on our pro-Lattimore side. Ms. Kustin is identified as a Ph.D.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 25, 2001
WASHINGTON - House Majority Leader Dick Armey accused NAACP President Kweisi Mfume and board of directors Chairman Julian Bond of "racial McCarthyism" in a letter to Mfume last week. Armey's accusations were made in response to comments Mfume and Bond made Feb. 17 during the NAACP's annual meeting in Washington, when both leaders said President Bush was sharply dividing the nation instead of uniting it as he has vowed to do. During the meeting, Bond told about 350 people gathered in the ballroom of the Capital Hilton, "Instead of uniting us, the new administration almost daily separates and divides."
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2003
A couple of weeks ago, a motley crew was sitting around in the Great Hall of Levering Hall on the Homewood campus of the Johns Hopkins University, telling stories. One was about the time a generation ago when Chester Wickwire was among the handful of people in the country authorized by the Pentagon to visit conscientious objectors held in military stockades, generally military personnel resisting the Vietnam War. Word came of a woman at Fort Meade who was locked up and refused to wear prison clothes because she saw them as another uniform.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 19, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In the short term, the surprise decision of Bobby Ray Inman to withdraw as President Clinton's nominee to secretary of defense blindsides Clinton in the one area where he most needs an experienced hand well regarded in Congress and in the military.But in the long run, if Inman's convoluted explanation for his action is any indication of how he would have conducted himself under the public glare of that high-profile job, he has probably done the president a big favor.Inman's pullout leaves Clinton with egg on his face, particularly in light of the retired admiral's arrogant observation at the time of the nomination that he was taking the job only after having reached "a level of comfort" with Clinton's "role as the commander in chief while I was secretary of defense."
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | June 5, 1993
To those who lived through them, the '50s were about as thrilling as a pot roast.Surviving tract homes in a tranquilized haze, eating TV dinners while watching "I Love Lucy," we were basically too busy conforming to society to recognize that brave new social experiments were happening all around -- and that we were the guinea pigs.The '50s, however, have been resurrected as a rich source of social research by historians, critics and journalists.With works such as David Halberstam's "The Fifties," Stephanie Coontz's "The Way We Never Were" and Brett Harvey's "The Fifties: A Women's Oral History," we can now cite this formative decade when tracing our collective neuroses, afflictions, icons, hopes and dreams.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2003
A couple of weeks ago, a motley crew was sitting around in the Great Hall of Levering Hall on the Homewood campus of the Johns Hopkins University, telling stories. One was about the time a generation ago when Chester Wickwire was among the handful of people in the country authorized by the Pentagon to visit conscientious objectors held in military stockades, generally military personnel resisting the Vietnam War. Word came of a woman at Fort Meade who was locked up and refused to wear prison clothes because she saw them as another uniform.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 22, 2002
LONDON - The silence about Charlie Chaplin has been broken. Much of the chat of his native England yesterday was about how he was denied knighthood for nearly 20 years because prudish Americans felt he was a Communist little tramp. After decades of mystery, British government documents - which were secret until their release over the weekend - show that the snub of the colorful black-and-white movie actor was primarily the result of his marriages to two 16-year-olds and American reaction to them.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 25, 2001
WASHINGTON - House Majority Leader Dick Armey accused NAACP President Kweisi Mfume and board of directors Chairman Julian Bond of "racial McCarthyism" in a letter to Mfume last week. Armey's accusations were made in response to comments Mfume and Bond made Feb. 17 during the NAACP's annual meeting in Washington, when both leaders said President Bush was sharply dividing the nation instead of uniting it as he has vowed to do. During the meeting, Bond told about 350 people gathered in the ballroom of the Capital Hilton, "Instead of uniting us, the new administration almost daily separates and divides."
NEWS
January 21, 1999
ANNE ARUNDEL County Executive Janet S. Owens should not dismiss her chief of staff, Linda Gilligan, just because her brother-in-law is Michael Gilligan. Mr. Gilligan may be a paid lobbyist for Chesapeake Motorsports Development Co., promoter of a controversial racetrack project, but that shouldn't disqualify Ms. Gilligan from serving in county government.Dismissing Ms. Gilligan over her relationship by marriage would set a precedent that could be carried to the absurd. Any group could conceivably target administration officials and hound them out of their positions for imagined unethical relationships.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 20, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The announced resignation of House Speaker-designate Robert L. Livingston sent shock waves through Capitol Hill yesterday, forcing the nation's political establishment to confront just how dangerous a wave of sexual recrimination has become."
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | March 13, 1998
IN the wake of the death of Fred Friendly this month, many commentators proudly recalled his and Edward R. Murrow's 1954 "See It Now" broadcast attacking Sen. Joseph McCarthy for his cruel demagogy on the Communists-in-government issue.It was an influential program, but Murrow and Friendly were journalistic johnnies-come-lately to exposing McCarthy and his recklessness. First were those ink-stained wretches who wrote for daily newspapers. The two earliest and most relentlessly effective were Phil Potter of The Sun and Murrey Marder of the Washington Post.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | February 11, 1991
AMONG THOSE who know him, Sen. Alan Simpson's harsh attack on CNN reporter Peter Arnett came as no surprise. The Wyoming Republican has a well-deserved reputation as one of the most embittered press-bashers in national politics.But the attack was stunning, nonetheless, because it was such blatant McCarthyism. Arnett, Simpson said, "was active in the Vietnam War and he won a Pulitzer Prize largely because of his anti-government material. And he was married to a Vietnamese whose brother was active in the Viet Cong.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 22, 2002
LONDON - The silence about Charlie Chaplin has been broken. Much of the chat of his native England yesterday was about how he was denied knighthood for nearly 20 years because prudish Americans felt he was a Communist little tramp. After decades of mystery, British government documents - which were secret until their release over the weekend - show that the snub of the colorful black-and-white movie actor was primarily the result of his marriages to two 16-year-olds and American reaction to them.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | June 20, 1994
DAN RATHER said last Wednesday that America was "trembling" in fear of Sen. Joe McCarthy in March of 1954, and that Edward R. Murrow's criticism of him that month did him in, or at least greatly helped do him in.The Murrow broadcast was terrific, but if America ever trembled at Joe McCarthy, it was much earlier than 1954.Joe McCarthy was a Republican senator from Wisconsin who found a Red under every bed in Washington, beginning in 1948. He was so thoroughly irresponsible and loathsome that even so cautious, conservative and Republican-leaning a newspaper as The Sun of those days consistently and repeatedly criticized him sharply -- beginning four years before the Murrow broadcast.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 19, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In the short term, the surprise decision of Bobby Ray Inman to withdraw as President Clinton's nominee to secretary of defense blindsides Clinton in the one area where he most needs an experienced hand well regarded in Congress and in the military.But in the long run, if Inman's convoluted explanation for his action is any indication of how he would have conducted himself under the public glare of that high-profile job, he has probably done the president a big favor.Inman's pullout leaves Clinton with egg on his face, particularly in light of the retired admiral's arrogant observation at the time of the nomination that he was taking the job only after having reached "a level of comfort" with Clinton's "role as the commander in chief while I was secretary of defense."
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