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September 13, 2004
On September 8, 2004 JUANITA MCCAIN. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Monday after 8:30 A.M. Family will receive friends on Tuesday at the Faith Tabernacle Church, 2422 W. Patapsco Avenue at 12:00 P.M., with services to follow at 12:30 P.M.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2014
Sen. John McCain of Arizona, a classmate of Charles R. Larson at the U.S. Naval Academy, says the four-star admiral and former academy superintendent was a "dear friend" and "great man" who, like McCain's father and grandfather, cast a large shadow. Admiral Larson, 77, died early Saturday at his home in Annapolis after a long illness. "As the son and grandson of four-star admirals, I have long been accustomed to living in the large shadows cast by great men," McCain said in a statement Sunday afternoon.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2014
Sen. John McCain of Arizona, a classmate of Charles R. Larson at the U.S. Naval Academy, says the four-star admiral and former academy superintendent was a "dear friend" and "great man" who, like McCain's father and grandfather, cast a large shadow. Admiral Larson, 77, died early Saturday at his home in Annapolis after a long illness. "As the son and grandson of four-star admirals, I have long been accustomed to living in the large shadows cast by great men," McCain said in a statement Sunday afternoon.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Most political endorsements touted by candidates typically elicit yawns. Until they garner gasps. Del. Jon Cardin, a Democratic candidate for Maryland attorney general, rejected an impromptu endorsement he landed last week from a rapper with a rap sheet. At a fundraiser, Cardin posed for a photo with Ski Money — aka Lawrence S. Christian — without knowing of the 37-year-old's criminal record. The rapper posted the photo to Instagram and Twitter with a note encouraging his followers to vote for Cardin.
NEWS
January 5, 1991
The first of "the Keating Five" senators, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., went before the Senate Ethics Committee yesterday to be cross-examined by committee members and counsel. It was not a pretty spectacle, and it suggests much uglier business next week.Senator McCain and Sen. John Glenn, D-Ohio, who also testified yesterday, appear to be the least culpable of the five senators accused of improperly influencing government regulators on behalf of financier Charles Keating. Robert S. Bennett, the Ethics Committee counsel, has recommended that the committee drop charges against the two.Yet consider one exchange yesterday between Senator McCain and Ethics Committee Chairman Howell Heflin, D-Ala.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | December 15, 1999
DES MOINES -- You didn't need a map the other night to know that the six surviving Republican presidential candidates were debating in Iowa. Except for Sen. John McCain, who isn't actively competing in the Jan. 24 precinct caucuses here, they bent over backwards to tell Iowans what they wanted to hear: a pro-farm family, anti-abortion, Christian message.And each of the other five candidates -- Texas Gov. George W. Bush, Steve Forbes, Gary Bauer, Sen. Orrin Hatch and Alan Keyes -- tried to outdo the others in convincing such folks that he is the most God-loving, child-protecting and farm-preserving of the bunch.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 6, 2001
WASHINGTON -- It may well be that the only reason Republican Sen. John McCain entertained Senate Democratic Leader Tom Daschle at his digs in Sedona, Ariz., over the weekend was to gaze at the sagebrush. But the timing and circumstances that provided the backdrop for their cozy meeting made more speculation of a McCain party switch inevitable. With Sen. Jim Jeffords' own leap to independent party status fresh in the public mind, it was only natural that the little get-together would send tongues wagging of yet another political love affair -- or at least a soft Democratic shoulder for another unrequited Republican to cry on. One or more of Mr. McCain's own political aides fanned the speculation with reports of conversations with other Democrats and McCain insiders about the chances of a third-party McCain bid for the presidency in 2004 -- if he finds himself mishandled by President Bush between now and then.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | February 8, 2008
On a day he became the prohibitive favorite to win the Republican presidential nomination, Sen. John McCain arrived at a veterans hall in Halethorpe, where he was greeted by about three dozen supporters waving signs and chanting his name. But not all inside were as enthusiastic last night about the Arizona senator. Many had bought tickets to see former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, only to learn yesterday he had abruptly dropped out of the race. At least one person in the audience wore a Romney shirt, and others said they were voting for McCain reluctantly.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | March 13, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Whatever his future, it is already fair to say that John S. McCain has left an impressive legacy in American politics. In his brief walk across the national stage, the Republican from Arizona has demonstrated that there are a substantial number of Americans who will respond positively to a candidate who says what's on his mind without parsing every sentence. That substantial number was not, of course, a majority of those who voted in Repubican primaries. They were outnumbered by those who preferred a far more conventional politician, Gov. George W. Bush of Texas.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | July 24, 2008
"Senator Obama didn't support the surge, wanted to pull out, said that it would fail. I supported it when it was the toughest thing to do. I believe that my record on national security and keeping this country safe is there. And the American people will examine our records, and I will win." That's John McCain explaining why he'll win. He's wrong. He's leading a loud chorus of conservatives and Republicans desperate to make the surge the defining issue of the campaign. It's understandable why so many Republicans see the surge as an ideal political battleground.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 13, 2013
There are so many things to admire about John McCain. His service during Vietnam, his courage as a prisoner of war, his maverick nature in the hidebound U.S. Senate and, currently, his role as the only grown-up in the Republican Party. But I don't think I will ever be able to forgive him for Sarah Palin. His decision to pluck her out of Alaskan obscurity and put her on the presidential ticket in 2008 unleashed a genie that yaks incessantly, makes no sense and refuses to get back in the bottle.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 19, 2013
In a now-rare exhibition of sensible compromise in the United States Senate, John McCain of Arizona has re-emerged as the unpredictable maverick who had seemingly vanished in his 2008 bid for the presidency. Mr. McCain is credited with persuading enough members of his party to agree to a deal that avoid a threatened "nuclear option" -- a change in Senate rules that would curb the minority's ability to obstruct executive branch nominations by filibuster. The deal broke an impasse between Majority Leader Harry Reid and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell over Mr. Reid's notion to bar filibusters on confirmation votes for certain nominees by letting a simple majority shut off debate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
Sarah Palin says it's a lie. Her press spokeswoman calls it "sick. " Other supporters of the former Alaska governor refer to it as a "hit job" - concocted by Hollywood leftists and the liberal media. Filmed in and around Baltimore last year, " HBO "s "Game Change," won't premiere until next Saturday. But even mostly sight unseen, the two-hour made-for-TV movie about John McCain's 2008 presidential campaign has generated a torrent of debate. Taking on a polarizing figure like Sarah Palin already makes "Game Change" one of the most evocative productions of the year.
NEWS
February 7, 2012
It's good to see that U.S. Sen. John McCainis still just as clueless as he was four years ago, but I'm sure the Chinese were not as amused as I was by his warnings that the "Arab Spring" was coming soon to China. It's too bad they didn't point out to Senator McCain that the "Arab Spring" has already come to America, under the banner of the Occupy Wall Street movement. I'm sure the senator would have found their remarks just as amusing as they found his. William Smith, Baltimore
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 6, 2012
The politics-by-the-numbers game we play has been quirkily friendly to Mitt Romney. He was able to waltz into New Hampshire a week before its Republican presidential primary boasting of being a winner in the Iowa caucuses. He could do so despite the fact that he beat former Sen. Rick Santorum, a mere asterisk in the standings a week earlier, by the infinitesimal margin of eight votes. In doing so, and after spending millions in an 11th-hour effort to make up for his near-absenteeism in Iowa, he actually won six fewer votes than he had garnered in his second-place finish there four years ago. Until that late gambling surge, the former Massachusetts governor had pretty much kissed off Iowa as unwelcome terrain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
Michael Ian Black facetiously named his stand-up special "Very Famous" — but it's true, depending on whom you ask. Black, the snarky comedian best known for his pop-culture takedowns on VH1, is a cult-hero for his work on MTV's '90s sketch-comedy show "The State," playing McKinley in "Wet Hot American Summer" and as a strange bowling alley manager on the NBC show "Ed. " He's currently headlining his "Black is White" comedy tour (which stops...
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 21, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott is learning, if he didn't already know it, that his Republican colleague, John McCain, is not a man to be trifled with. When Mr. McCain discovered last week that Mr. Lott was holding back the McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform bill passed by the Senate rather than sending it to the House for consideration, he pushed through an unusual resolution calling on the Senate leader to do so. It was an embarrassment to Mr. Lott, particularly coming at the instigation of the Senate Republicans' most prominent maverick.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 18, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Republican Sen. John McCain is not a man to thumb your nose at. He made that clear once again the other day in serving notice to would-be scuttlers of the new campaign finance law he spent seven years helping to steer through Congress. Barely more than a week after the law went into effect, Mr. McCain fired the opening volley of a new drive to confront artful dodging by the national parties, including his own, and others to evade the "soft money" ban. The ban is the core reform of the law that he, Democratic Sen. Russ Feingold of Wisconsin, Democratic Rep. Marty Meehan of Massachusetts and Republican Rep. Christopher Shays of Connecticut pushed through earlier this year.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 22, 2011
"I would find myself trussed up and left for hours in ropes, my biceps bound tightly with several loops to cut off my circulation and the end of the rope cinched behind my back, pulling my shoulders and elbows unnaturally close together. It was incredibly painful. " — Sen. John McCain from his book, "Faith of My Fathers" "[John McCain] doesn't understand how enhanced interrogation works. " — former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum For the record, John McCain was learning "how enhanced interrogation works" when Rick Santorum was still trying to find a good acne cream.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | May 20, 2011
For those who don't know, U.S. Senator John McCain was a prisoner of war in Vietnam for five years, where he saw up close the terrible, ineffective nature of torture. McCain has since spoken out against torture (aka "enhanced interrogation techniques") for these very reasons.  "In my personal experience, the abuse of prisoners sometimes produces good intelligence, but often produces bad intelligence," McCain said on the floor of the Senate recently. "Under torture a person will say anything he thinks his captors want to hear -- whether it is true or false -- if he believes it will relieve his suffering.
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