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By Art Buchwald | August 18, 1995
WITH ALL the giant mergers going on and no one protesting, I think of the lawyer in the antitrust division of the Justice Department as the Maytag man. He keeps sitting by the telephone, but it never rings.I went to visit him the other day. He was in his bare office with his feet on the desk. He was tossing rolled-up pieces of paper into a small basketball hoop attached to his wastebasket."I'm sorry to bother you," I said."You're not disturbing me," he said. "No one ever comes here anymore.
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BUSINESS
By Rick Pearson and Rick Pearson,Chicago Tribune | September 15, 2007
NEWTON, Iowa -- Soon the only items coming out of Newton bearing the Maytag name will be the blue cheese made famous at the farms created by the appliance giant's founding family. Before October ends, the final few hundred washer-dryer assembly workers at the immense Plant 2 at Maytag Corp.'s world headquarters will clock out and get their last paychecks, shuttering an operation that had employed as many as 2,600 workers five years ago. It will be one more step in the $2.6 billion acquisition and consolidation begun last year by rival appliance-maker Whirlpool Corp.
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NEWS
By Art Buchwald | January 30, 1995
I DIDN'T think he existed, but I have found the only defense attorney who has not been interviewed on television about the O.J. Simpson trial. His name is John Campbell and because nobody has ever asked for his advice, his fellow barristers refer to him as the "Maytag Man of Lawyers."I discovered him sitting by his phone waiting for it to ring."Why do you think that you never got the call from a talk show host concerning O.J.?" I asked John."I know as much as anyone else," he said. "I'm very presentable, and I can second-guess the prosecution and the defense as well as any big-shot lawyers appearing on 'Today' and 'Good Morning America.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 23, 2005
Maytag Corp. directors, after waiting in vain for a rival suitor to raise its bid, agreed yesterday to sell the company to longtime appliance-industry rival Whirlpool Corp. for $1.7 billion. The proposed acquisition is far from a sure thing, however. Because a Whirlpool/Maytag combination will hold a nearly 50 percent share in certain segments of the household-appliance marketplace, the acquisition is expected to face tough, protracted scrutiny from federal antitrust regulators. Yesterday's accord ends a lengthy bidding process that began in May, when an investor group led by the New York buyout firm of Ripplewood Holdings offered to buy financially struggling Maytag for $14 a share, or $1.12 billion.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 28, 1990
Lewis "Bud" Maytag Jr., who walked away from the appliance company founded by his grandfather to pursue an interest in flying that led to his becoming chief executive officer of National Airlines, died of cancer Sunday.His death in Colorado Springs, Colo., at age 64 came after a five-year struggle with cancer.Born in Rochester, Minn., he was heir to the Maytag Appliance Co. fortune when he moved to Colorado Springs while he was in high school. He later attended Colorado College.Shunning the family business, he became a pilot and founded Maytag Aircraft Corp.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 23, 2005
Maytag Corp. directors, after waiting in vain for a rival suitor to raise its bid, agreed yesterday to sell the company to longtime appliance-industry rival Whirlpool Corp. for $1.7 billion. The proposed acquisition is far from a sure thing, however. Because a Whirlpool/Maytag combination will hold a nearly 50 percent share in certain segments of the household-appliance marketplace, the acquisition is expected to face tough, protracted scrutiny from federal antitrust regulators. Yesterday's accord ends a lengthy bidding process that began in May, when an investor group led by the New York buyout firm of Ripplewood Holdings offered to buy financially struggling Maytag for $14 a share, or $1.12 billion.
BUSINESS
By Rick Pearson and Rick Pearson,Chicago Tribune | September 15, 2007
NEWTON, Iowa -- Soon the only items coming out of Newton bearing the Maytag name will be the blue cheese made famous at the farms created by the appliance giant's founding family. Before October ends, the final few hundred washer-dryer assembly workers at the immense Plant 2 at Maytag Corp.'s world headquarters will clock out and get their last paychecks, shuttering an operation that had employed as many as 2,600 workers five years ago. It will be one more step in the $2.6 billion acquisition and consolidation begun last year by rival appliance-maker Whirlpool Corp.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 9, 2005
Whirlpool Corp., seeking to dislodge another bidder and lock up a deal, raised its buyout bid for struggling industry rival Maytag Corp. $2 yesterday to $20 a share, or $1.6 billion. In a rare and potentially costly maneuver, Whirlpool's offer also includes a promise to pay Maytag a $120 million "reverse breakup fee" if the government blocks the acquisition on antitrust grounds. The sweetened offer "reflects both the value we see in the combination of Whirlpool and Maytag and the confidence we have in the ultimate receipt of regulatory approval for the transaction," said Whirlpool Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Jeff Fettig.
FEATURES
By Laura Sullivan and By Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2001
SAN FRANCISCO - Fritz Maytag stands in front of two large copper-pot stills, steam rising from a dozen feet of twisting pipes. He dips his finger under a stream of clear liquid flowing into a stainless-steel bucket and brings it to his mouth. A look of concentration crosses his face, like a mad scientist tasting his brew. "You can taste the fragrance," he says approvingly. Maytag's pot stills, for gin and whiskey, are his new hobby, and the latest trend of his that others are already copying.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | February 23, 2003
Call it a gardener's paradise. The Maryland Home and Garden Show, which runs Friday through March 2 and March 7-9 at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium, boasts more than 600 exhibitors offering gardening and home products, ideas and tips. A "Feature Garden" will be set up across 2,500 square feet, designed by last year's "Best of Show" landscaper, Kingsdene Nurseries, with Colonial Maryland themes and native Maryland plants. Experts from the world of gardening, including renowned landscape architect Wolfgang Oehme and horticultural pro Kurt Bluemel, will present talks, and there'll be competitions by the Federated Garden Clubs of Maryland and the Maryland Orchid Society.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 20, 2005
DES MOINES, Iowa - Maytag Corp., the object of a takeover contest, is cutting about 16 percent of the work force at its washer and dryer plant in Newton, Iowa. The job cuts stem from reduced demand for the factory's products and take effect Sept. 6, Maytag spokesman John Daggett said yesterday. The elimination of 200 jobs will leave about 1,000 workers at Maytag's hometown factory, the company's oldest, said Ted Johnson, president of United Auto Workers Local 997. Maytag has trimmed the company's work force by 20 percent and closed its Galesburg, Ill., plant as it loses market share to Whirlpool Corp.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 13, 2005
CHICAGO - Maytag Corp.'s board, reversing its earlier stance, declared Whirlpool Corp.'s risky but richer $21-a-share buyout proposal to be superior to the $14-a-share bid that Maytag earlier accepted from a private investment group. The Newton, Iowa, company's move late yesterday appears to put Whirlpool's $1.7 billion bid in the lead as the fight over Maytag moves into its final stage. But Whirlpool hasn't won yet. The contest for Maytag began in May, when an investor group led by the New York leveraged-buyout group Ripplewood Holdings offered to buy the company for $14 a share, or $1.11 billion.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 9, 2005
Whirlpool Corp., seeking to dislodge another bidder and lock up a deal, raised its buyout bid for struggling industry rival Maytag Corp. $2 yesterday to $20 a share, or $1.6 billion. In a rare and potentially costly maneuver, Whirlpool's offer also includes a promise to pay Maytag a $120 million "reverse breakup fee" if the government blocks the acquisition on antitrust grounds. The sweetened offer "reflects both the value we see in the combination of Whirlpool and Maytag and the confidence we have in the ultimate receipt of regulatory approval for the transaction," said Whirlpool Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Jeff Fettig.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 28, 2005
Maytag Corp. has agreed to open its books to suitor Whirlpool Corp., as the two appliance-industry rivals edged closer to a possible deal. Whirlpool, of Benton Harbor, Mich., said yesterday that it entered into a confidentiality agreement with Maytag, under which Whirlpool can "immediately commence" the in-depth examination of a buyout target's nonpublic financial materials. Whirlpool has said it is willing to pay $18 a share, or about $1.43 billion, to buy Maytag, assuming a review of Maytag's finances turns up no previously unknown problems.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 19, 2005
Maytag Corp. shares jumped yesterday after rival Whirlpool Corp. unexpectedly unveiled a $17-a-share buyout bid to become Maytag's third suitor. Despite a number of question marks that surround Whirlpool's $1.37 billion cash-and-stock proposal, investors bet that Maytag will draw an even higher bid: In New York Stock Exchange trading, Maytag shares surged $2.03, or 13 percent, to close at $17.48. Whirlpool said that if it succeeds in acquiring cash-strapped Maytag, it could strengthen the smaller company's competitive position by introducing technological innovations and economies of scale.
BUSINESS
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - China's bid to buy such marquee American companies as Unocal Corp. and Maytag Corp. prompted a strong political reaction in Congress yesterday, with some lawmakers calling on the Bush administration to take a tougher stance against Beijing's trade policies and investigate its effort to take over a major U.S. oil company. Many economists said China is trying to hedge its bets by trying to purchase Unocal, hoping to nail down supplies in case of any future disruptions in the oil market.
FEATURES
By HOUSTON CHRONICLE | April 3, 1999
Holy product placement!Moviegoers who caught "EDtv" during its opening weekend couldn't help but notice the number of name-brand products featured in the film.For those not familiar with the concept of "EDtv," it's the tale of Ed, a regular guy who agrees to let a cable TV channel broadcast his life, 24 hours a day.Ed eats Pop Tarts for breakfast and drinks lots of Pepsi. His girlfriend, Shari, delivers packages for UPS, wearing the company's trademark brown uniform.Factor in the dozens of companies -- including Calgon, Saturn, Maytag and Trojan -- who buy commercial time on Ed's TV show, and who could blame moviegoers for assuming serious cash was made from product placement?
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 14, 1993
For decades, counter tops in bathrooms were, at most, 30 inches in height, while kitchen counters were 6 inches taller. Does that make sense? Of course not, but those dimensions nevertheless remain the American standard.Slowly, finally, the situation is changing. Many newly built homes feature 36-inch counter-tops in master bedroom-bath combinations. Other traditional and equally illogical placements are beginning to be rethought as well.Jim Krengel, design director for Maytag's Kitchen Idea Center, offers some interesting tips for how to save time and improve efficiency in the kitchen.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | February 23, 2003
Call it a gardener's paradise. The Maryland Home and Garden Show, which runs Friday through March 2 and March 7-9 at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium, boasts more than 600 exhibitors offering gardening and home products, ideas and tips. A "Feature Garden" will be set up across 2,500 square feet, designed by last year's "Best of Show" landscaper, Kingsdene Nurseries, with Colonial Maryland themes and native Maryland plants. Experts from the world of gardening, including renowned landscape architect Wolfgang Oehme and horticultural pro Kurt Bluemel, will present talks, and there'll be competitions by the Federated Garden Clubs of Maryland and the Maryland Orchid Society.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2001
CHICAGO - The U.S. Olympic Committee yesterday selected as its chief executive a former college basketball player and corporate leader who will become the first African-American to hold the high-profile position. In hiring Lloyd Ward, a former chairman of Maytag Corp., as secretary general, the organization passed over former Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who had been one of three finalists for the job. The decision, which angered athletes on the USOC executive committee who had hoped for a CEO with an Olympic background, came after a day of meetings and presentations by the finalists.
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