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Baltimore Sun staff | September 11, 2011
Baltimore Democrats head to the polls on Tuesday to choose their nominee for mayor. In a city where Democrats outnumber Republicans by nine to one, the primary winner is all but assured of winning the general election in November. Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who was named mayor last year after the resignation of Sheila Dixon, is mounting her first campaign for the office. Her challengers include former Clerk of Court Frank M. Conaway Sr., City Councilman Joseph T. "Jody" Landers III, state Sen. Catherine E. Pugh and former city planning directorOtis Rolley.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake leads the money race against potential future political opponents with more than $350,000 on hand, a review of the most recent campaign finance reports shows. Rawlings-Blake, who is up for re-election in November 2016, raised about $15,000 in the most recent reporting period, which ran from June 9 to Aug. 19. The filings were due Aug. 26. While potential mayoral contenders are keeping their plans close to the vest, political observers say the filings reveal others who might be considering a run for the city's top elected post.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2011
Six candidates for Baltimore's highest office squared off on fixing the city's schools, boosting the economy and fighting crime at a forum hosted by one of the city's largest churches Tuesday evening. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was conspicuously absent from the mayoral candidates' debate, which drew more than 400 spectators to Northwest Baltimore's Empowerment Temple. Rawlings-Blake was slated to visit eight National Night Out events throughout the evening. The Rev. Jamal-Harrison Bryant, pastor of the Empowerment Temple, called out Rawlings-Blake in his opening remarks.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn | June 13, 2014
Among the participants in this year's Baltimore Pride Parade will be Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, gubernatorial candidate Heather Mizeur and Ken Ulman , who is gubernatorial candidate Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's running mate. The politicians say they have embraced the local LGBT community, with Rawlings-Blake performing the first gay marriage in Baltimore City in 2013 and conducting the first mass gay wedding in Druid Hill Park later that year. Mizeur would be the first female and openly gay governor in Maryland if elected.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2011
They rapped on doors, waved bright signs, groused about the media, ate chicken wings, and shook hands - lots and lots of hands. The women and men hoping to win the Democratic nomination to be Baltimore's next mayor whirled through the city Monday, seeking to sway last-minute support as the primary neared. In the biggest race, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake faces four challengers, but elections officials did not expect a crush of voters. "We're all ready for whoever comes," said Armstead B. Crowley Jones Jr., director of the Baltimore Board of Elections.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2011
Six candidates for Baltimore mayor sounded off on education, drug addiction, vacant homes and job creation at a Tuesday night forum sponsored by a coalition of nearly three dozen advocacy groups. Speaking before a spirited standing room crowd of about 500 people, including many youth, candidates Clerk of Court Frank M. Conaway Sr., education activist Vicki Ann Harding, former City Councilman Joseph T. "Jody" Landers, state Sen. Catherine Pugh, former city planning director Otis Rolley and nurse Wilton Wilson, hashed out their platforms for more than three hours.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, Julie Scharper and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2011
Mayoral candidate Otis Rolley bounded down the steps of a West Baltimore home and flashed what looked like two victory signs. "Two twos!" he said. A campaign assistant scrolled through a list of voters on an iPad and recorded the twos - shorthand for pretty strong support - which the Rolley campaign hopes will lead to support in Tuesday's primary. In the crowded field of Democratic candidates for mayor, getting voters to the polls remains the last hurdle on the road to victory.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Charleta Jones isn't looking for just one job. She's looking for two: something full time and something on the side, to help repair the financial damage she suffered after losing her job last year as a paratransit driver. "I've been out of work for over a year, so I have to catch up on everything," the 39-year-old Reservoir Hill woman said last week. Jones has a range of experiences on which to draw, including security, housekeeping and fast food, and she's landing interviews. Still, she said, the job market is decidedly rough.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2011
Ella Bailey and her two grandsons hurried down a strip mall sidewalk on a recent sultry summer morning, sipping bottles of pineapple soda. The three passed by a dark swirl on the sidewalk, a bloody reminder that a delivery man was fatally shot at this Northeast Baltimore shopping center less than a month ago. A gouge in the parking lot marks the spot where a bullet ricocheted, shopping center employees say. "All day, all you hear is ambulances and...
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | September 2, 1995
Political static comes with the territory in a mayoral campaign -- but not the kind experienced Thursday night when WJHU-FM (88.1) planned to simulcast the audio portion of a televised debate between Baltimore's Democratic candidates.The debate originated at MPT studios in Owings Mills. Transmission difficulties at the MPT transformer in Anne Arundel County left the radio station with dead air, and listeners ended up hearing National Public Radio's "All Things Considered."But WJHU program director Chris Wienk says the lively debate among Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, City Council President Mary Pat Clarke and third candidate Kelley C. Brohawn will be re-broadcast at 7:30 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
On a small stage in a dimly lit room, Josh Cohen and Mike Pantelides stared at their laptop screens and crafted short statements about Annapolis politics for an audience they could not see. Brevity was a necessity — the candidates for Annapolis mayor were participating in a debate using the social media site Twitter, where messages are limited to 140 characters. The Twitter debate was a first in Annapolis, where Cohen, Pantelides and other candidates in this fall's city elections have added social media to their more typical campaign strategies of knocking on doors, mailing brochures and speaking at voter forums.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
The city of Baltimore has lost its case against the wife of former mayoral candidate Otis Rolley, who it claimed owed the city $26,100 for taking months of paid leave she hadn't earned while working for City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young. Charline Rolley said Thursday that the victory is "bittersweet, but definitely a weight off my shoulders. " City Solicitor George Nilson said in a statement that taxpayers will now be left footing the bill. The city had sued Rolley for breach of contract and unjust enrichment, and asked the court to force her to repay the city for the salary she earned while on paid leave to give birth, take care of her sick infant and work on her husband's campaign.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
The city of Baltimore has filed suit against the wife of former mayoral candidate Otis Rolley, demanding $26,100 for months of leave that were erroneously granted her because of a computer glitch. Charline Rolley took more than 90 days of paid leave — to give birth, tend to her sick infant and work on her husband's campaign — during the time she was employed by Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's office. The civil suit accuses Rolley of breach of contract and unjust enrichment for taking the leave time and demands that she pay for the salary that she received while taking vacation and sick days that had been incorrectly allotted to her. An attorney for Rolley called the suit "outrageous" and said that she should not have to pay for the city's error.
EXPLORE
By Aisha Azhar | October 28, 2011
The biggest challenge for any future mayor is to work within their means, Mayor Craig Moe said Thursday night at a candidates forum organized by the Laurel Board of Trade. When asked what was the No. 1 difficulty that would be faced in the upcoming mayoral term, Moe pointed to the city's $3 million reduction in revenue this year. There were 88 foreclosures in Laurel this year, more than ever before, Moe said Mayoral candidate Valerie Cunningham answered the question on biggest challenge in one breath: "Jobs, jobs and more jobs.
EXPLORE
October 26, 2011
I am a business owner in Laurel, and I am writing to express my support for Mike Sarich. In addition to the challenges inherent in opening a business, the current city administration adds layers of complexity and inconvenience to the risk. This is not how successful, lively cities attract and keep business! Small businesses are the backbone of a community, and I have watched far too many businesses start and falter. Mike Sarich's plans to encourage business development in the city are a refreshing change, and I am optimistic about Laurel's development under his leadership.
EXPLORE
October 26, 2011
As city administrator, my position serves "at the pleasure of" the mayor who appointed me, Craig A. Moe. I understand my position may end next month; and I accept that. However, one of my most important duties and responsibilities is to protect the city's exceptional employees. City employees provide the services that make our city a great place to live, work and do business. I believe I must speak out for our valuable employees to share the feelings they have expressed to me and their co-workers.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1995
Maryland Public Television tonight begins a series of September programs probing the issue of violence and children. And for daytime cable cruisers, VH1 has live coverage of the ribbon-cutting at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.* "Voters Ask: Baltimore Mayoral Candidates" (7:30 p.m.-8 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- Yes, there are Republicans running for mayor of Baltimore. Reporters Nate Howard and Jeff Salkin offer taped profiles of Victor Clark Jr. and Arthur W. Cuffie Jr. MPT.* "Boy Meets World" (8:30 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
The man who helped turn Philadelphia's $230 million deficit into a $70 million annual budget windfall has volunteered to help the next Baltimore mayor bring fiscal order to city government.David L. Cohen, former chief of staff for Philadelphia Mayor Ed Rendell, has told Baltimore's two mayoral candidates that he is willing to serve on the next administration's transition team.Mayoral nominee Martin O'Malley jumped at the offer, meeting with the fellow Democrat Oct. 15 to discuss the offer.
EXPLORE
October 11, 2011
I have known Mike Sarich for 30 years. We grew up in Laurel, friends and classmates together at St. Mary of the Mills and St. Vincent Pallotti. We have watched our vibrant community turn slowly into what it is today - a shell of the once stand-up city it used to be. We've watched friend after friend and family after family leave the town they spent 20+ years in, because they couldn't bear to watch their city die a slow, painful death. The Laurel Mall and Main Street have fallen by the wayside.
EXPLORE
October 6, 2011
I found it annoying to read the innuendoes and half-truths contained in Michael Sarich's candidate profile ( "Sarich seeking a return to local elective office," Leader, Sept. 29). The economy did adversely impact the developer's ability to obtain requisite funding for mall renovation. The $16 million tax increment financing "carrot" offered by the mayor and City Council to save the project was clearly an exercise of leadership. His call for a Main Street Marketer defies logic.
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