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NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | September 6, 2007
A former aide to Del. Jill P. Carter's mayoral campaign sued the campaign this week for $236 in unpaid expenses, the latest political finance dispute faced by a candidate running for office in Baltimore this year. Ellen Townsend, a Carroll County resident, said she performed secretarial duties for Carter's campaign this year and incurred the expenses - mostly cell phone charges - during late April and early May. She filed a small-claims lawsuit for the money in Maryland District Court on Tuesday.
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
The purloined gift cards. The fur coats. The bicycling tours of the city with staffers.  And, of course, the famous shoe incident. Former mayor Sheila Dixon's tenure in City Hall is ripe with material for comedians.  On Thursday, seven comics and local media personalities will be poking fun of  Dixon -- to her face-- at a "Roast and Toast" at the Baltimore Comedy Factory. Why would Dixon, who resigned in 2010 as part of a plea deal to settle criminal charges, agree to a such a thing?
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NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
The race to be Annapolis' next mayor has quickened, with a former mayor saying he might seek his old job and another candidate trying to quell rumors he is getting out.Dennis M. Callahan, who was soundly beaten in his campaign for re-election in 1989 by Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins, stunned city politicians when he confirmed Friday that he is "seriously considering" running for the seat next year.Meanwhile, Alderman Carl O. Snowden says that despiterumors, he is "definitely not" angling to become executive director of the Annapolis Housing Authority -- a "high pressure cooker" job that pays more than $60,000 a year.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake launched her campaign to repair Baltimore's long-neglected schools Monday, introducing a bill to more than double the city's bottle tax as part of a plan to borrow hundreds of millions of dollars to fix dilapidated buildings. "This is something that we can use to help change the landscape when it comes to the physical needs for our schools," the mayor said of the tax. "Our kids deserve better, and sometimes it takes tough decisions to make sure that we provide a way forward for a better school system.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 22, 2011
And so school is out and summer begins, and still most of the public swimming pools in the city of Baltimore are not open. Because of the government's money problems - and because, I suspect, so much private money is tied up this year in a crowded mayoral campaign and the Labor Day Grand Prix - we have swimming pools opening on a staggered schedule, with some not available to children in the poorest neighborhoods until July 9. Can't we do...
NEWS
June 3, 1995
Comments that ordinarily might be ignored can be inflammatory when spoken in the heat of a mayoral campaign. Such rhetoric must be assessed in proper context to prevent misunderstandings that destroy good will. Let that be the case with statements attributed to Baltimore Housing CommissionerDaniel P. Henson III concerning past migration of Jewish families from lower Park Heights.Mr. Henson is denying he made remarks to Sun columnist Michael Olesker that seemed to blame the economic decline of lower Park Heights on the outmigration of former Jewish and other white residents to the suburbs.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | July 10, 2007
Hot enough for you? The answer, in this case, appears to be yes. ESPN debuted its miniseries The Bronx is Burning last night at 10 (and will replay the first episode tomorrow night at 10, followed by seven episodes each Tuesday night at 10 starting next week), and Yankees lovers and haters alike shouldn't miss it. Billy Martin, George Steinbrenner and Reggie Jackson have indelible public images for every baseball fan, but the actors playing the respective roles - John Turturro, Oliver Platt and Daniel Sunjata - have nailed them.
NEWS
April 29, 1995
It would seem that the mayoral candidates would have plenty to talk about before the Sept. 12 primary election: Baltimore keeps losing population, job-providing businesses and tax revenue. Blocks and blocks of rowhouses are vacant and boarded up. Crime continues to be a major concern and city schools need desperate attention.Yet the duel between City Council President Mary Pat Clarke and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke so far has hardly touched on substantive issues. Instead, the candidates have been engaging vicious sniping and ugly name calling that bodes ill for the rest of the campaign, unless it is stopped now.Relations between the two highest elected officials at City Hall have always been complicated.
NEWS
April 11, 1995
Tired of hearing complaints about the Baltimore Development Corp., Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has assembled a nine-member group to study the future of the city's economic development arm. The panel will be working under the gun: Mr. Schmoke wants changes implemented in July, when the new fiscal year begins. Both the review and the tight deadline are reassuring. Amid a chorus of complaints, the mayor until recently steadfastly maintained BDC was doing a bang-up job.The departure of the agency's acting head -- while its director, Honora Freeman, was on a sick leave -- finally brought things to a head.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich and Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writers | May 17, 1995
Baltimore City Council President Mary Pat Clarke had a cash balance in her mayoral campaign of $6,976.87 as of November, according to a report filed yesterday.The report for Mrs. Clarke's campaign committee covers the period from November 1993 through Nov. 1, 1994, and shows total receipts of $52,995 and expenses of $46,018.13.The report of Citizens for Mary Pat Clarke '95 is the first filed by the campaign committee she set up in the fall of 1993, after she announced she would challenge Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's bid for a third term.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 14, 2011
It was a beautiful day in the city of Baltimore, and the Ravens weren't on TV, so we can't blame weather or football. But there are a bunch of other explanations for the low-and-slow voter turnout in the 2011 city primary, and here are 12 of them: 1.This was the most overrated mayoral race in memory. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake had some attractive opponents, and one of them had Bill Cosby on his side. Plus, they all talked about something that should have excited voters - cutting property taxes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2011
Bluer than Democrat-rich Baltimore! Able to distract morning commuters with a single wave! Look! On the street corner with Jody Landers! It's actual fun in this year's mayoral campaign! Blue Man, a mysterious figure in a full-body Spandex suit, has swooped in from who-knows-where to help former City Councilman Joseph T. "Jody" Landers with his weekday morning car waves. There's no telling if the seeming superhero can help Landers in September's Democratic primary, but he has already succeeded in injecting some zip into an otherwise snoozy race.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 22, 2011
And so school is out and summer begins, and still most of the public swimming pools in the city of Baltimore are not open. Because of the government's money problems - and because, I suspect, so much private money is tied up this year in a crowded mayoral campaign and the Labor Day Grand Prix - we have swimming pools opening on a staggered schedule, with some not available to children in the poorest neighborhoods until July 9. Can't we do...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 11, 2011
Baltimore's mayoral campaign of 2011 is finally starting to heat up (at least a little bit).  How do we know? The first negative ad was posted on YouTube today.  With Eminem and Rihanna's "Love the way you lie" playing in the background, the video shows a series of articles that (I suppose) are intended to make the viewer think negatively of current Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.  The video shows five articles in all:   • 72,000 Baltimore residents to find themselves in new City Council districts Friday.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | September 6, 2007
A former aide to Del. Jill P. Carter's mayoral campaign sued the campaign this week for $236 in unpaid expenses, the latest political finance dispute faced by a candidate running for office in Baltimore this year. Ellen Townsend, a Carroll County resident, said she performed secretarial duties for Carter's campaign this year and incurred the expenses - mostly cell phone charges - during late April and early May. She filed a small-claims lawsuit for the money in Maryland District Court on Tuesday.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | August 12, 2007
We moan about their cost and their length, but political campaigns provide useful tools for choosing leaders. Campaigns are often high-intensity affairs, mimicking the rigors of office-holding. They demand disciplined organizations, dogged adherence to schedule and strategy, skilled handling of media and care of other people's money - their contributions. Ideally, campaigns convey a sense of the candidate's hopes and dreams - and whether he or she has a clue about how to turn them into reality.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | September 2, 1995
Political static comes with the territory in a mayoral campaign -- but not the kind experienced Thursday night when WJHU-FM (88.1) planned to simulcast the audio portion of a televised debate between Baltimore's Democratic candidates.The debate originated at MPT studios in Owings Mills. Transmission difficulties at the MPT transformer in Anne Arundel County left the radio station with dead air, and listeners ended up hearing National Public Radio's "All Things Considered."But WJHU program director Chris Wienk says the lively debate among Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, City Council President Mary Pat Clarke and third candidate Kelley C. Brohawn will be re-broadcast at 7:30 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2001
To avoid any appearance of a conflict of interest, Mayor Martin O'Malley said, he has returned a $2,000 campaign contribution made by an owner of a strip club seeking to lease a city-owned building. Rosalie Jackson, an owner and the mother of El Dorado Lounge manager Kenneth A. Jackson, gave $2,000 to O'Malley's mayoral campaign in August 1999. O'Malley said he didn't know about the contribution until January, when an article in the City Journal, a New York-based magazine on urban affairs, reported it. O'Malley returned the $2,000 to Rosalie Jackson on Jan. 22, according to a copy of the refund check.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | August 4, 2007
City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. said yesterday that his father, the former treasurer of his mayoral campaign, believed a portion of the $40,000 in political funds he spent on personal expenses was an appropriate use of campaign money. In his first effort to calm the storm surrounding the story, Mitchell said he had a disagreement with his father over whether the expenses were proper, but he offered few clues about why his father, a doctor who lives in Guilford, spent money that is supposed to be used only for political expenses.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | July 10, 2007
Hot enough for you? The answer, in this case, appears to be yes. ESPN debuted its miniseries The Bronx is Burning last night at 10 (and will replay the first episode tomorrow night at 10, followed by seven episodes each Tuesday night at 10 starting next week), and Yankees lovers and haters alike shouldn't miss it. Billy Martin, George Steinbrenner and Reggie Jackson have indelible public images for every baseball fan, but the actors playing the respective roles - John Turturro, Oliver Platt and Daniel Sunjata - have nailed them.
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