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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Gerard Shields and Ivan Penn and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1998
Five days after Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke announced that he would not seek a fourth term in office, a growing field of candidates is clamoring to fill his job.School board member Carl Stokes and former City Council candidate A. Robert Kaufman plan to announce their candidacies today. That brings the number of candidates in the race so far to three, after city Register of Wills Mary W. Conaway said Friday -- as she was being sworn in -- that she was entering the mayor's race.In addition, a half dozen others have said they are considering a run for the city's top post, including City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III, city Comptroller Joan M. Pratt, Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III, State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy, state Sen. Joan Carter Conway, and state Del. Howard P. "Pete" Rawlings, the influential chairman of the House Appropriations Committee.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Annapolis Mayor-elect Joshua Cohen has named a former campaign opponent in the mayor's race and a Republican to be part of his transition team. Former mayoral candidate Zina C. Pierre will co-chair Cohen's transition team. Pierre, founding president and CEO of the Washington Linkage Group Inc., a political consulting group, bested Cohen in the Democratic primary but left the race after her personal financial problems became public. Cohen, the runner-up, was nominated by Democrats to replace her. Cohen has publicly supported Pierre, who has said she will remain engaged in civil life, and sought to gain her campaign supporters.
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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1999
A Baltimore citizens group that successfully pushed for the nation's first "living wage" law five years ago said yesterday that it intends to register 6,000 new voters to restore a neighborhood voice to the mayor's race.In addition to the voter registration drive, Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD) -- whose 2,000 members come from churches, labor unions and community groups -- also issued a six-point program for the next mayor.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is stepping down in December after a 12-year tenure.
NEWS
September 8, 2007
Baltimore : Politics Environment groups endorse Sarbanes The city and state's main environmental groups have chosen to stay out of the mayor's race, while endorsing Michael Sarbanes for City Council president. The Baltimore City League of Environmental Voters and Maryland League of Conservation Voters decided not to endorse in the mayor's race after interviewing Mayor Sheila Dixon and City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. and concluding they were both strong on environmental issues, said Liz Nelson, a spokeswoman for the Maryland League of Conservation Voters.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Ivan Penn and Gerard Shields and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1999
Baltimore City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III said yesterday he intends to run for mayor, possibly setting up a Democratic showdown in September against his cousin, NAACP President Kweisi Mfume.The 10-year council veteran's comments came a day after Gov. Parris N. Glendening signed a bill reducing the residency requirement for city mayoral candidates from one year to six months. While Mfume has repeatedly denied plans to run, the law would allow him to enter the contest. Last month, Mfume purchased an Inner Harbor condominium.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1999
Some came as spectators, others to show their support for Baltimore mayoral hopeful Lawrence A. Bell III at a fund-raiser last night.Whatever the reason, Bell's first major fund-raiser of this election year garnered $430,000 for a potential mayoral race.The $500-a-ticket event drew a crowd packed with the politically powerful, including state Comptroller William Donald Schaefer, Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan and Kweisi Mfume, Bell's cousin and president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
NEWS
By John Fritze | August 9, 2007
Five candidates in Baltimore's mayoral race will face off on WOLB-AM this morning in a debate-like forum - among the first such discussions to be broadcast live. The candidates will speak on The Larry Young Morning Show (1010 AM) from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Each candidate will offer opening and closing statements and will answer questions from journalists and listeners. "It's an outlet for our listeners and those running for office to dialogue," Young said. Mayor Sheila Dixon, City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr., schools administrator Andrey Bundley, Del. Jill P. Carter and Circuit Court Clerk Frank M. Conaway are expected to attend.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1999
City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III proposed yesterday a 10 percent increase in the salaries of Baltimore's top elected officials in hopes of staving off a larger increase down the road for the next mayor.Bell, who has expressed a strong interest in becoming mayor, said the city's elected officials should receive pay increases no higher than those given to rank-and-file municipal employees -- about 10 percent over the past four years."The most important thing about leadership is leadership by example," Bell said.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1999
Three former Baltimore mayors gathered in front of City Hall yesterday, pledging support for NAACP President Kweisi Mfume's run for mayor -- if only he would join the race.The event was a historic moment in Baltimore politics as former Mayors Thomas D'Alesandro III, Clarence H. Du Burns and William Donald Schaefer, the state's comptroller and former governor, stood in front of a black and yellow sign reading, "Draft Mfume.""Kweisi Mfume is a street scholar," D'Alesandro, wearing a blue and orange "Draft Mfume" button, told journalists.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1999
Baltimore Register of Wills Mary W. Conaway has no problem distinguishing herself from the seven other mayoral candidates hoping to win September's Democratic primary.She is woman. Hear her roar.On drugs: "I believe there is a conspiracy. Black folks don't have planes to transport these drugs; we need to find the people that are bringing it in."On cutting the city budget: "I'm sure that in all of the departments that there are people who don't do anything."On campaign contributions: "I'm glad I'm not backed by the big money backers, because I can say no."
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | September 2, 2007
Despite modest gains by her chief opponent, Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon maintains a dominating lead ahead of this month's Democratic primary, a new poll for The Sun shows. Her opponents have attacked her ethics and have blamed her for this year's staggering increase in homicides, but Dixon's large lead has barely eroded - though an increasing percentage of voters do say that they have an unfavorable impression of her. With nine days until the Sept. 11 election, Dixon leads City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. by 46 percent to 19 percent - a 27 percentage-point spread - according to the poll conducted by OpinionWorks, an independent Annapolis-based firm.
NEWS
By John Fritze | August 9, 2007
Five candidates in Baltimore's mayoral race will face off on WOLB-AM this morning in a debate-like forum - among the first such discussions to be broadcast live. The candidates will speak on The Larry Young Morning Show (1010 AM) from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Each candidate will offer opening and closing statements and will answer questions from journalists and listeners. "It's an outlet for our listeners and those running for office to dialogue," Young said. Mayor Sheila Dixon, City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr., schools administrator Andrey Bundley, Del. Jill P. Carter and Circuit Court Clerk Frank M. Conaway are expected to attend.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun Reporter | November 14, 2006
City Council President Sheila Dixon has more money on hand for a 2007 mayoral campaign than nearly a dozen other potential candidates combined - meaning that Dixon may have an edge in fundraising on top of the advantage she is guaranteed by incumbency. Though the primary is still 9 1/2 months away - and fundraising for the mayor's race is not expected to get under way in earnest until January - Dixon has amassed a significant treasury of $278,000, more than double that of the next-best-funded candidate.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | September 14, 2006
William Donald Schaefer for mayor of Ocean City? The 84-year-old political veteran said yesterday that he might think about jumping into the resort's mayoral election now that he lost his race to remain state comptroller. But Ocean City officials say Schaefer can't run -- because he can't meet a four-month town residency requirement in time for the candidate filing deadline Tuesday. In a joking aside yesterday to reporters who came to mark the passing of the former Baltimore mayor and governor's 51-year political career, Schaefer suggested that he might be up for a run at the top spot at Maryland's favorite beach -- a beloved vacation getaway where he has owned property for years.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1999
Well, now they've done it. The three main candidates in the mayor's race answered questions about race head-on in a televised debate the other night.The verdict? No big deal.In contrast to the racially charged mayor's race of 1995, issues of black and white this year seem secondary to education and crime, housing and economic development.Officials and organizations have bestowed an uncommon number of cross-racial political endorsements, mostly from blacks to Martin O'Malley and whites to Carl Stokes.
NEWS
August 11, 1999
IF THE primary were held today, the mayor's job would be a tossup among Martin O'Malley, Carl Stokes and Lawrence A. Bell III. But in the five weeks remaining before the Sept. 14 primary, anything could happen.State Sen. Clarence W. Blount's long-delayed endorsement yesterday put Carl Stokes firmly back in the mayor's race. The former city councilman and school board member now appears to have halted the erosion of support and financial backing that followed disclosures that he had lied about graduating from college.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Annapolis Mayor-elect Joshua Cohen has named a former campaign opponent in the mayor's race and a Republican to be part of his transition team. Former mayoral candidate Zina C. Pierre will co-chair Cohen's transition team. Pierre, founding president and CEO of the Washington Linkage Group Inc., a political consulting group, bested Cohen in the Democratic primary but left the race after her personal financial problems became public. Cohen, the runner-up, was nominated by Democrats to replace her. Cohen has publicly supported Pierre, who has said she will remain engaged in civil life, and sought to gain her campaign supporters.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun Reporter | November 14, 2006
City Council President Sheila Dixon has more money on hand for a 2007 mayoral campaign than nearly a dozen other potential candidates combined - meaning that Dixon may have an edge in fundraising on top of the advantage she is guaranteed by incumbency. Though the primary is still 9 1/2 months away - and fundraising for the mayor's race is not expected to get under way in earnest until January - Dixon has amassed a significant treasury of $278,000, more than double that of the next-best-funded candidate.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1999
Two chief Baltimore mayoral rivals have begun posting billboards and airing radio ads in each other's voting strongholds. City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III has picked up billboard help across the city from the police and fire unions, while fellow Councilman Martin O'Malley targeted black voters with radio ads. The Fraternal Order of Police, Firefighters Union and Baltimore Fire Officers Association spent $3,000 to post 12 billboards...
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1999
Baltimore Register of Wills Mary W. Conaway has no problem distinguishing herself from the seven other mayoral candidates hoping to win September's Democratic primary.She is woman. Hear her roar.On drugs: "I believe there is a conspiracy. Black folks don't have planes to transport these drugs; we need to find the people that are bringing it in."On cutting the city budget: "I'm sure that in all of the departments that there are people who don't do anything."On campaign contributions: "I'm glad I'm not backed by the big money backers, because I can say no."
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