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By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2003
The killing of a councilman by a gunman inside New York's City Hall yesterday recalls a shooting rampage 27 years ago in Baltimore that left one councilman dead, wounded four people and led to tighter security for the mayor and City Hall. The attack occurred April 13, 1976, at temporary City Hall quarters at 26 S. Calvert St. The building was connected to an adjoining one at 131 E. Redwood St., where Charles A. Hopkins - angry that the health department had closed his carryout business - charged through the corridors searching for then-Mayor William Donald Schaefer.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
Baltimore Inspector General David N. McClintock, who earned a reputation for thorough investigations and independence, is leaving city government, the mayor's office said Thursday. McClintock is leaving Baltimore for Jefferson Parish, La., where he will take on "a new opportunity," the mayor's office said. McClintock will become that jurisdiction's chief internal investigator. “David McClintock has done a very good job improving the Office of the Inspector General since his arrival in 2010, turning a dysfunctional office into a real asset for city government to use to investigate potential fraud, waste, and abuse,” Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Gregory P. Kane and Gerard Shields contributed to this article | September 30, 1998
Controversial radio talk-show host C. Miles Smith was fired this week for taking his stinging commentary too far when he made unsupported allegations on the air about Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's politics and sex life.During his regular program Thursday, Smith, the host of a morning talk show on WOLB-AM (1010), criticized Schmoke for defending city police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier, who was under fire for miscounting the city's shootings.Smith said on his program that Schmoke was defending Frazier because the commissioner perhaps had pictures of the mayor in compromising situations.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2012
Baltimore officials plan Wednesday to extend the contract of two firms that provide many of the city's information technology workers, saying they need more time before allowing other companies to compete for the work. Under the terms of a $2.4 million deal, Digicon Corp. will continue to provide the Mayor's Office of Information Technology with staffers for an additional six months. The administration also is moving to extend the contract of another IT staffing firm, Telecommunication Systems Inc., for $2.7 million over six months.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | February 15, 2008
Mayor Sheila Dixon's former chief spokesman - who was placed on leave after allegations of inappropriate behavior - is no longer under investigation, and no charges will be filed, the Baltimore County state's attorney's office announced yesterday. Anthony W. McCarthy, who had served as a top aide and communications director to Dixon starting in January 2007 when she became mayor, said during an emotional news conference that he had done nothing wrong.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
Baltimore City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake named a five-member team to guide her transition to the mayor's office, a group that includes several lawyers, a community activist and a well-known lobbyist and political strategist. The group will review city agencies to "ensure all public and taxpayer funds are used in the most effective and efficient manner," recruit additional transition team members and evaluate policy in six broad areas. "Now more than ever, Baltimore needs innovative fiscal reform that protects core services, especially public safety, public education and job creation efforts," said Rawlings-Blake, who will take office Feb. 4, after the resignation of Mayor Sheila Dixon.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky | October 26, 1991
Baltimore's firefighters are in the streets, passing out brochures and urging citizens to call City Hall to protest dramatic budget cuts that mean layoffs and closed fire companies. The firefighters hope the mayor's office will be flooded with complaints.The problem is: The mayor's office is holding back the deluge.It simply isn't taking the calls.Yesterday, a receptionist briskly and politely transferred callers complaining about Fire Department budget cuts right over to the fire chief's office -- even though the mayor, not the fire chief, is responsible for the final budget.
NEWS
August 18, 1992
Mayor's office seeking donationsThe Mayor's Office of Community Services and Substance Abuse is seeking donations to help defray the cost of T-shirts touting the City's anti-drug activities.Send contributions to: The Mayor's Office of Community Service, c/o The City of Annapolis, 160 Duke of Gloucester St., Annapolis, Md. 21401.Information: 263-7932.Congressional aide applications acceptedDistrict 1 Congressman Wayne Gilchrest is currently accepting applications for internships in his Washington office and in the four district offices in Salisbury, Chestertown, Aberdeen and Waldorf.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,Staff Writer | October 28, 1993
The Baltimore Police Department is drawing up plans to cut the training it gives to recruits so it can meet Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's mandate to put at least 330 new officers on the street over the next four years -- 150 of them in the next year alone.The plan, which has been in the works since last summer, has already reduced the standard eight-month police academy training program by almost a month. And police commanders are looking to shave additional hours from the curriculum so they can move more classes through the school.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | December 16, 1993
A chunk of concrete the size of a tennis ball, apparently hurled like a baseball, shattered the glass in the door of New Windsor Mayor Jack A. Gullo's office Tuesday.State police said they received a call to the mayor's private law office in the 100 block of Green Valley Road about 8:45 p.m. and found the chunk of concrete had broken a double pane of glass, damaged a venetian blind, ricocheted off a side wall and put a hole in the wall opposite the door.The destruction, estimated at more than $250, occurred between 3:30 p.m. and 8:45 p.m., Tfc. Rudolph Hansen, New Windsor's resident trooper, was told.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
Baltimore elected officials said Friday they were outraged by an inspector general's report that found the Mayor's Office of Information Technology and a former deputy mayor withheld information from and misled city officials about a controversial project to install nearly $675,000 in phone and computer equipment. "I am extremely concerned if it happens to be the case that the administration is engaged in misleading top city officials," said Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke. "If it proves to be the case, I will say that I am deeply concerned about this approach to government and to life.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
Comptroller Joan Pratt sent a series of public information act requests to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration this week seeking records related to a controversial deal to purchase high-tech phones and related equipment. Pratt says that Rawlings-Blake has stonewalled her on the subject since a June meeting of the city's spending board at which the mayor shot down a contract that the comptroller's office had drawn up with IBM to overhaul the city's phone system.  Rawlings-Blake said at the time that she wanted the comptroller's office to work more closely with the Mayor's Office of Information Technology on the deal.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
Baltimore officials on Wednesday approved an expansion of the police department's camera system that will give officers quick access to private security cameras at businesses and homes that choose to be part of the effort. The new program, funded by a $53,200 grant from the Abell Foundation, will create a single database of both public and private camera systems, which the mayor's office says will allow police to solve crimes faster. Citizens and business owners will be able to opt into the program by registering their security cameras with the Mayor's Office of Information Technology through a web application, city officials said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Friday the hiring of a new chief technology officer to replace the official who resigned amid ethics concerns in February. Chris Tonjes, the chief information officer for the District of Columbia Public Library, was chosen after a national search, the mayor's office said. He will start work July 23 in Baltimore. "We are excited to announce the appointment of a qualified and forward-thinking individual to oversee an increasingly important government agency," Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
NOTE: To read an update to this story with a more complete response from the mayor's office, click here . Baltimore Comptroller Joan M. Pratt on Wednesday accused Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and her former Information Technology Director Rico Singleton of cutting an illegal $659,000 side deal to install high-tech video phones and related equipment in City Hall offices.  "Under the mayor's direction, Mr. Rico Singleton, who...
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
With a half-dozen key resignations at Baltimore City Hall, some political observers say they're concerned about the recent loss of institutional knowledge in Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration. Since the fall, the city's budget director, development chief, parks director and the mayor's chief of staff have left or announced plans to leave. They were joined this week by Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III and the mayor's liaison to the Police Department, Sheryl Goldstein.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1995
They come to City Hall for everything.Even Band-Aids.Annapolis residents have stumbled into the city government's historic office building at 160 Duke of Gloucester St. for concerns that are anything but political."
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | February 29, 1996
The morning after she voted against the mayor's choice for housing commissioner, city Councilwoman Lois Garey received a call from Kurt L. Schmoke's office: An important meeting scheduled tomorrow among the mayor, Ms. Garey and Federal Hill community leaders was off.Community leaders and Ms. Garey had sought the meeting, which had been on the mayor's calendar for almost a month, to discuss their continuing concerns about Southern High School. Neighbors say students threaten them and leave trash.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
Peter O'Malley, who has served as chief of staff to Baltimore's mayor for less than a year, is leaving City Hall to join a private law firm. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced O'Malley's departure and several other Cabinet-level staff changes in a statement Friday. O'Malley, the younger brother of Gov. Martin O'Malley, joined Rawlings-Blake's administration in May 2011, months before her bid to win reelection. He is becoming a government relations partner at the law firm of Venable LLP. "Peter came in at a critical time and made important changes and structural improvements that will have lasting, positive impact going forward," Rawlings-Blake said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2010
Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy said she will file for an injunction against the mayor and City Council if an "unconstitutional" budget recommendation is not corrected. "If you fail to revise your recommendation to the [Board of Estimates] I shall have no choice but to pursue a legal remedy," Jessamy wrote in a letter mailed last week to city Finance Director Edward J. Gallagher and copied to Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake's chief of staff. At issue is the elimination of 14 outreach positions, which act as liaisons between District Court and the community, from the city prosecutor's office.
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