Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMayor And Council
IN THE NEWS

Mayor And Council

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Jacques Kelly and Hanah Cho and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2004
LeRoy Lindy Conaway, who ran a country store and - for 16 years as mayor - the city of Westminster, died Monday of lung disease at Carroll Hospital Center. He was 73. Mr. Conaway served on the City Council from 1964 to 1973, and he was elected in 1973 to the first of four consecutive terms as mayor. He lost the job by a 12-vote margin in 1989. "I had hoped to leave before I was kicked out," Mr. Conaway said as he left office. "I have enjoyed working with the council, and I feel we have really advanced the city."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By James B. Astrachan | October 2, 2014
Violations of civil rights by the Baltimore City Police Department are at best a callous disregard for the rights of citizens; at worst, they are criminal. They are also horrendously expensive for the city's taxpayers. More than $20 million has been paid out in the past decade, according to reports in The Sun and Daily Record, to resolve claims that officers used excessive force or engaged in otherwise improper conduct, such as denial of due process, unreasonable searches and seizures and other violations of civil rights.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1998
In New Windsor the other night, the town council dealt with a resident's complaint, unanimously enacted a curfew ordinance and discussed a recreation project in a record 20 minutes.The complaint was real, but the actions were invalid.For its annual meeting Wednesday with the County Commissioners, New Windsor staged a mock town council session. Francis Scott Key High School students took the roles of mayor and five council members in an event that celebrated Municipal Government Week."We want to show students what municipal government does," said Mayor Jack A. Gullo Jr. "It is the government closest to people and most responsible."
NEWS
Editorial from The Record and The Aegis | May 31, 2013
What's the fair going rate to pay someone who has been elected to public office? It's an open question, and one that needs to be asked often and, once settled for one generation, asked anew again for the next generation. These days it's being asked in Aberdeen, thanks to a proposal from the city's elected officials to increase the rates of pay for the offices they hold. Famously, Ulysses S. Grant, after serving as president in the wake of his decisive role in helping preserve the Union in the Civil War, was far from set for life in his retirement.
NEWS
April 22, 1998
The Taneytown City Council approved a pay increase for the mayor and council members at its April 13 meeting.The resolution raises the mayor's compensation from $2,400 to $4,600 a year, and council members' from $30 per meeting to $1,800 a year.Pub Date: 4/22/98
NEWS
March 17, 1991
With a number of elected town officials facing expiring terms in office this May, elections here promise to ring in a new brand of leadership or reaffirm the current mayor and council for another four years.That is, if anybody shows up to the election. With little more than three weeks until nominations for office are due, no one has filed for any of the three spots up for grabs. Mayor Earl A. J. "Tim" Warehime Jr. and council members John A. Riley and Larry Gouker all facere-election on May 22.Registration of voters will take place April 1 from 4 to 8 p.m.
NEWS
November 21, 2001
Alderman honored for 20 years' service on city council Alderman Samuel Gilmer, the Democrat who has represented the 3rd Ward in Annapolis for 20 years, was honored by his council colleagues Monday night when they renamed the Transportation Building at 308 Chinquapin Round Road for him. The resolution, sponsored by the rest of the council and Mayor Dean L. Johnson, was introduced with feigned urgency, catching Gilmer off guard and moving him to tears....
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1994
Despite earlier discussions about providing more parking for residents of Taneytown's Clover Court, city officials have decided not to create a new parking lot on that street in the Cloverberry development.City Manager John L. Kendall said the mayor and City Council decided before he was hired April 6 "not to take any action on it because it was an issue of private property."Clover Court residents Dianna and Nathan Fowler had asked the city in August to consider converting the grassy lot beside 417 Clover Court into parking for the residents who do not own spaces.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 26, 1995
Continuing to find themselves on opposite sides despite public promises to work together, the Democratic nominees for mayor and council president, Kurt L. Schmoke and Lawrence A. Bell III, have chosen different candidates for council vice president.Mr. Bell said yesterday that he will support 4th District Councilwoman Agnes Welch in the three-way race for the position.Mr. Schmoke said weeks ago that he would support Councilwoman Sheila Dixon, who also represents the 4th District.Also running for the position is 2nd District Councilman Anthony J. Ambridge.
NEWS
June 15, 2012
The Sun is correct in saying that the city's bottle tax increase is "no cause for great celebration" and that residents already "suffer disproportionately from poverty and high taxes" ("Beyond the bottle tax," June 13). Yet in the same breath you applaud the City Council's decision to pass the tax, saying it has the potential to transform our schools and city into a beacon of hope that will attract thousands of families. To the contrary, the current beverage tax has failed the city, fallen woefully short, cost good jobs and hurt local grocery stores.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
The funeral procession for Matthew Hersl crawled through the tight streets of Southeast Baltimore, moving past the Milan restaurant, the Inner Harbor Travel agency and the Little Italy parking garage. Steve Hersl, Matt's brother, blared his car horn as he inched along. A blue passenger van with a Baltimore Orioles hat resting on the dashboard led the convoy through the 45-year-old city finance supervisor's neighborhood. As the procession passed his home, Steve leaned out his black Hyundai and yelled, "I love you, Matt!"
NEWS
February 6, 2013
It should come as no surprise that Baltimore City's long-term fiscal prospects are bad. The population has dropped by more than a third since its peak, poverty and unemployment are high, and the signs of disinvestment are everywhere. Meanwhile, the way the city provides government services remains effectively unchanged, and the cost of everything from police to code enforcement grows every year. But just how bad things are has never been apparent, largely because no one has had the stomach to ask. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake did, and the answer, presented to the City Council today, was grimmer than most would have guessed.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | November 15, 2012
An overflow crowd showed up at Sykesville's Town Council meeting on Nov. 14 - nearly all of them coming to register their disapproval of the town's Nov. 1 firing of Jean Maher, longtime manager of the Sykesville's downtown post office. The Sykesville Old Main Line Visitor's Center and Post Office has been shuttered since Nov. 5, when its remaining three employees - Connie McKay, Kathy Gambrill and Judy Lettie - resigned in protest of Maher's dismissal. In an open letter to the community posted on a local blog, sykesvilleonline.com, McKay, Gambrill and Lettie voiced support for Maher, saying they were "baffled" by the circumstances surrounding the dismissal.
NEWS
June 23, 2012
As a concerned Baltimore City school teacher, I was caught up in the City Council's deliberations regarding the bottle tax ("Bottle tax rise gains in council," June 12). I was imagining a classroom with beautiful, vibrant colors and large clear windows that allowed natural light to pass through. I thought of clean scents of newness and possibilities. I thought of how I could help my students understand that our school is an example of what is possible through hard work and perseverance.
NEWS
June 15, 2012
The Sun is correct in saying that the city's bottle tax increase is "no cause for great celebration" and that residents already "suffer disproportionately from poverty and high taxes" ("Beyond the bottle tax," June 13). Yet in the same breath you applaud the City Council's decision to pass the tax, saying it has the potential to transform our schools and city into a beacon of hope that will attract thousands of families. To the contrary, the current beverage tax has failed the city, fallen woefully short, cost good jobs and hurt local grocery stores.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
The Annapolis panel that oversees elections said Wednesday that it lacks the authority to investigate the residency of Alderman Kenneth A. Kirby, who does not have a permanent home, leaving the matter to the mayor and city council to decide. "Being that there is no pending primary or election, it is not appropriate to investigate or make determinations of a sitting alderman's ability to serve," said Mike Parmele, chairman of the Board of Supervisors of Elections. Annapolis Mayor Joshua J. Cohen, a Democrat, after receiving complaints from city residents, had called for the election board and the city attorney to investigate whether Kirby lives in the ward and whether he is required to under city law. The board heard testimony from a small number of residents during a public meeting Wednesday night at City Hall . Kirby, a Democrat, attended the meeting but did not speak.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | January 26, 1993
City Councilman Kenneth A. Yowan planned to ask his colleagues at last night's meeting to have a citizens group study whether Westminster should pay its mayor and council members more.Mr. Yowan said his proposal stemmed from a study of elected officials' salaries across the state compiled recently by the Maryland Municipal League and from the approach of the next city government election May 10.Westminster mayor and council compensation has not been adjusted since 1983, "and if we don't do it now, we'll have to wait until 1997" for new salaries to become effective, Mr. Yowan said.
NEWS
By AMY L. MILLER and AMY L. MILLER,Staff writer | September 12, 1990
WESTMINSTER - Acting upon the recommendations of an advisory panel on government, the City Council unanimously voted to consider legislation creating the position of a city manager.Members plan to vote on ordinance No. 533 at the Sept. 24 meeting."This is with the understanding that any amendments and changes can be added at a later time," Snyder said.The Advisory Task Force on Governmental Administration, which also suggested that better relations between the mayor and City Council were necessary, said a manager would separate creation of policy by the mayor and council from its implementation by city staff.
EXPLORE
October 19, 2011
Next month's city elections were a long time coming. The current mayor and council members had 14 months added to their four- and two-year terms when Laurel's election day was moved to the first November in odd-numbered years to distance the date from state and national elections. This year, the mayoral race is a three-way contest, with two challengers facing off against a two-term incumbent. In the race for the at-large City Council seat, a seven-term council member is being challenged by a newcomer.
NEWS
September 10, 2011
The Sun endorsed incumbent Stephanie Rawlings-Blake for Baltimore mayor, but many readers have different ideas. Here's a sampling of letters to the editor and online commentary from Sun readers about whom they're voting for (or against) in Tuesday's city primary election. I was taken aback by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's poor performance at the League of Women Voters debate at the Pratt library ("Challengers assail Rawlings-Blake in final debate," Aug. 31). The bottom line is not that the mayor was "assailed" by her opponents, as The Sun said, but that people are upset with the state of this city - which she represents.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.