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November 1, 2011
Editor: Patrick McGrady is my neighbor. I have known him for almost 26 years. I'm supporting him for mayor of Aberdeen because I trust him and his family. They are honest, God-fearing, and hard-working. Patrick will work tirelessly to get Aberdeen back to basics: clean water, safe streets and low taxes. Aberdeen will have a bright future if we elect Patrick McGrady. Gisele Knapp Aberdeen
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The longtime head of the Mayor's Office of Employment Development plans to retire in January. Karen Sitnick, 64, who has worked for the city for more than 30 years, was appointed director of the $24.9 million, 191-person agency in 2000. During her tenure, the department worked with the city school system and the Johns Hopkins University to establish schools with a focus on careers and equipping students with work experience. She launched Baltimore's Youth Opportunity program in 2000, focused on connecting at-risk youth with a suite of services, from academic support and job training to health care.
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NEWS
August 30, 2011
The other night I was awakened at 2 a.m. by a robocall from the "mayor and city council of Baltimore" alerting me about the upcoming hurricane. I am thoroughly disgusted and very angry about it - even more so because I couldn't speak to anyone in city government on Sunday. When I called the City Hall operator I was given the number for the mayor's office of constituency, which, of course, was closed. I wonder who was responsible for this snafu... Naomi Walpert, Baltimore
NEWS
October 8, 2014
The recent coverage of police brutality in Baltimore has been unnerving ( "Civil wrongs," Oct. 5). However, the recent column by Dan Rodricks reflects exactly how disgusted I've been with every other area of city governance. Mr. Rodricks points out how the police commissioner and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake turn a blind eye to paying fines and never delving into the problem ( "Mayor should have seen troubling brutality trend," Oct. 5). But to raise taxes to cover the consequences while raising their salaries and enjoying all the "perks" of office is not fixing the problem.
NEWS
April 19, 2011
Today in New York, I am wearing an autographed "Baltimore is Best" necktie in memory of former Governor and Baltimore Mayor William Donald Schaefer, which signed necktie was sent me by this amazing advocate for Baltimore. While I am profoundly sad to have heard of Don's passing, I am simultaneously profoundly proud of the "Maryland memories" which his unique style and effervescent personality allowed my wife and me to share. Edward B (Woody) Ryder IV, Greenlawn, N.Y.
NEWS
by Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will endorse Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown's candidacy for governor Monday, according to a source close to the Brown campaign. The mayor's support for Brown is no surprise, given Rawlings-Blake's close political alliance with Gov. Martin O'Malley, who has been an open supporter of Brown. But her support will add to the momentum Brown has built up since officially announcing his candidacy in May and adding Howard County Executive Ken Ulman to his ticket.
NEWS
By Kurt Schmoke, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
During my time in office, members of the downtown business community and other citizens urged me to take action against the area known as The Block. Since the end of World War II, The Block has been a concentration of strip clubs and X-rated bookstores. However, by the 1990s, The Block acquired a reputation for attracting people engaged in drug dealing, prostitution and other unsavory activity. Pressure mounted to close the last remaining block of what once was three blocks of sex-based entertainment.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
The mayor's "safety walk" would have been more impressive if she had taken it after sundown - and if she hadn't been accompanied by at least seven uniformed members of Baltimore's Finest, including the police commissioner ( "Rawlings-Blake, Batts stroll to show safe harbor," June 4). Ron Zaczek, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
June 7, 2014
I found your article "Rawlings-Blake, Batts stroll to show safe harbor" (June 4) pretty amusing. I am fairly sure that any of us would feel safe walking around downtown with an armed police commissioner and what appear to be several other armed officers as well as several patrol cars. I think I would have been more impressed if the mayor had been alone and watched over discretely from afar by that heavy police presence. David Gosey, Towson - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
May 27, 2012
It was good to see the mayor of Baltimore walking around the downtown as reported recently in The Sun ("Mayor has a look as police presence rises in downtown," May 20). But once the photo opportunities were done, then what? It might behoove the mayor to spend a bit more unannounced walking time downtown with her family. Hopefully, she won't encounter what Dan Rodricks did on a walk, as reported in a recent column by him ("Knuckleheads not wanted," May 20). He was almost run down by some children on bicycles racing through the Inner Harbor area.
NEWS
By Stephanie Rawlings-Blake | October 7, 2014
In Dan Rodricks ' recent column (" Mayor Should Have Seen Troubling Brutality Trend ," Oct. 4) Mr. Rodricks asks a fair question. Noting that I have been a member of the Board of Estimates for the past seven years - both as mayor and City Council president - he asks if I recognized the troubling trend in excessive force court judgments before an article citing years-old cases appeared in The Baltimore Sun. Mr. Rodricks is forgiven for,...
NEWS
By Mark Puente and Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
As Baltimore Police Department officials prepare for a Department of Justice probe into allegations of brutality, leaders of the local police union criticized the outside scrutiny and said it could make city streets less safe. A host of reforms, along with a strategic plan unveiled last year, shows the department is serious about improving its relationship with the community, Fraternal Order of Police President Robert Cherry said Monday. The new federal scrutinty could make city officers fearful of being second-guessed and lead to ineffective policing, he added.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 4, 2014
That's a wise move by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Tony Batts, asking the feds to open a civil rights investigation into police brutality and how cases are handled here. But I have a question: She took office in February 2010; didn't the mayor recognize a troubling trend in settlements and court judgments before she read about them in this newspaper? It's a tough job, running the city; it's hard to keep track of everything. But, as a member of the Board of Estimates since 2007 - first as City Council president, then as mayor - didn't Rawlings-Blake notice damages going to victims of beatings and other appalling police actions?
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The spokesman for the Baltimore City Fire Department said Friday he is leaving city government to move to D.C. because his wife has accepted a new job.  "It is a bittersweet moment for us," said Ian Brennan, who was previously a press secretary for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. "I am proud of my wife for taking this step forward in her career, but it is sad to leave the city we love -- the city where our children were born. " In addition to working for Rawlings-Blake, Brennan also served as a spokesman for Mayor Sheila Dixon.
NEWS
By James B. Astrachan | October 2, 2014
Violations of civil rights by the Baltimore City Police Department are at best a callous disregard for the rights of citizens; at worst, they are criminal. They are also horrendously expensive for the city's taxpayers. More than $20 million has been paid out in the past decade, according to reports in The Sun and Daily Record, to resolve claims that officers used excessive force or engaged in otherwise improper conduct, such as denial of due process, unreasonable searches and seizures and other violations of civil rights.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake says she is throwing her support behind City Councilman William "Pete" Welch's bill calling for a large tax break for urban farmers in Baltimore. In legislation pending in a City Council committee, Welch is seeking a 90 percent break on property taxes for urban farmers who grow and sell at least $5,000 of fruit and vegetables a year. The credits, which must be approved by the city's Cffice of Sustainability, are good for five years, but can be renewed for a total of 10 years, according to the bill.
NEWS
April 11, 2011
The Mayor and Housing Authority of Baltimore's insist that they cannot pay court judgments for victims of lead paint is unconscionable, unjust and completely unacceptable. I am shocked and outraged that the Mayor of Baltimore and the Housing Authority of Baltimore will not stand up for the most vulnerable citizens of Baltimore: the children. How can the Housing Authority and the Mayor turn their backs on the victims and disregard the rule of law? The Mayor and the Housing Authority Board members have taken a solemn oath of office to uphold the laws of the State of Maryland and they should do just that, uphold the law. What is more troubling is the clear pattern of mismanagement by the Administration and the Housing Authority on the issue of lead paint.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Two influential City Council members introduced legislation Monday that would require every Baltimore police officer to wear a body camera within a year - a move they argue would cut down on police brutality in the aftermath of several high-profile misconduct allegations. Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young and Councilman Warren Branch, chairman of the panel's public safety committee, cited questions surrounding the in-custody death last year of Tyrone West and a recent video showing an officer repeatedly punching a suspect, among other cases, as reasons for the proposed law. It would require all of Baltimore's nearly 3,000 sworn police officers to wear a device constantly recording the audio and video of their interactions with the public.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
William A. Fogle Jr., who served as Mayor William Donald Schaefer's executive assistant and all-purpose troubleshooter and later became secretary of the Maryland Department of Licensing and Regulation, died Wednesday at his Glen Rock, Pa., farm of complications from a stroke. He was 79. "Bill was Mayor Schaefer's troubleshooter, and any time he had problems, he knew he could rely on him," said Tom Toporovich, former secretary to the Baltimore County Council and a longtime friend.
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