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NEWS
August 15, 2004
If you spend much time sitting at a computer, you'll likely experience aches and pains. On average, your body can tolerate being in one position for only 20 minutes before you feel the need to adjust for comfort. -- Mayo Clinic
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Outfielder Michael Morse, who finished the season hitless in his last 10 games with the Orioles, will undergo surgery Wednesday to fix a bone outgrowth in his left wrist, according to an industry source. Dr. Richard Berger of the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota will perform the arthroscopic surgery, which will shave the bone. The source said Morse should be able to begin using the wrist again in four weeks and should be back to baseball activities in six to eight weeks, so the pending free agent should be a full go by the start of spring training.
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NEWS
January 6, 1991
Carroll County General Hospital has announced that Mayo Medical Laboratories of Rochester, Minn., is its new clinical reference laboratory.Although about 95 percent of testing is done in the CCGH laboratory, other testing will be forwarded to Mayo Medical Laboratories. Tests destined for MML are requested by CCGH lab technologists using amicrocomputer and transmitted over phone lines to MML's laboratory computer.Samples will be picked up six afternoons per week and transportedby overnight air delivery to MML. Most reports will be transmitted back within one to four days.
EXPLORE
June 18, 2012
Regarding the June 14, letter commenting on New York's proposed ban on sodas ("New York Mayor Bloomberg's ban on sodas should be backed") my interest soon changed to destain when the author listed "public subsidies" a culprit to the obesity epidemic, jumping from sugary drinks to tobacco, meat and dairy and corn. More than 90 percent of agriculture subsidies go to five crops - wheat corn, soybeans, rice and cotton. Another source says the U.S. government heavily subsidizes grains, oilseeds, cotton, sugar and dairy products.
NEWS
July 1, 1994
Otis M. Smith, 72, the first black to serve on the Michigan Supreme Court and the first to be named a corporate officer of General Motors Corp., died in his sleep at his home in Detroit Wednesday after a four-year bout with prostate cancer. He retired from GM in 1984 as vice president and general counsel. He became one of the highest-ranking blacks in corporate America when Thomas Murphy, GM's chairman, appointed him the automaker's top lawyer in 1977. At the time, the corporation was under attack on several legal and regulatory fronts, including accusations of tax fraud and lawsuits by consumers angry about the substitution of engines from one car division in models from another GM division.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | July 4, 1993
For the third consecutive year, the Johns Hopkins Hospital has been rated the nation's best hospital in U.S. News & World Report's annual survey of American hospitals.But this year, the news magazine used what it said was a more sophisticated method to measure excellence, taking into account death rates, technology, nurse-to-bed ratios and other "objective" criteria along with an opinion survey of 2,400 physicians.Previously, a hospital's ranking was based solely on the reputation it enjoyed among physicians.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1997
Two weeks after the Mayo Clinic suggested a possible link between two popular weight-loss drugs and a heart disorder, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has learned of 17 additional cases in states ranging from Maryland to California.The reports came in response to an FDA letter, dated July 8, asking doctors to document any cases of heart valve disease among patients who took diet pills used in a combination known as "fen-phen."The agency has yet to evaluate the reports, and the link between fen-phen and heart disease remains unproved.
EXPLORE
June 18, 2012
Regarding the June 14, letter commenting on New York's proposed ban on sodas ("New York Mayor Bloomberg's ban on sodas should be backed") my interest soon changed to destain when the author listed "public subsidies" a culprit to the obesity epidemic, jumping from sugary drinks to tobacco, meat and dairy and corn. More than 90 percent of agriculture subsidies go to five crops - wheat corn, soybeans, rice and cotton. Another source says the U.S. government heavily subsidizes grains, oilseeds, cotton, sugar and dairy products.
FEATURES
By Linda Carroll and Linda Carroll,Medical Tribune News Service | January 3, 1995
Could Grandma's forgetfulness actually be a sign of drug addiction? Perhaps, according to a new study that found that sleeping pills and pain-killers are among a handful of prescription drugs that may be abused by the elderly.Among older people, women and those suffering from depression or anxiety disorders are more likely to become addicted, researchers reported in the December issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings."It's important for people to know that it is possible to become addicted to certain medications that are prescribed by doctors," said lead author Dr. Richard E. Finlayson, a psychiatrist and medical director of the Inpatient Addiction Program at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.
NEWS
By JAY NEUGEBOREN and JAY NEUGEBOREN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 12, 2006
Physical: An American Checkup James McManus Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 255 pages / $24 About two-thirds of the way through Physical: An American Checkup, James McManus' account of events preceding and following a three-day, $8,484.25 physical he undergoes at the Mayo Clinic, McManus receives a call from his wife, Jennifer: At a children's birthday party, their 5-year-old daughter, Grace, has had her eye punctured by a two-pronged wire sticking out from the end of a magic wand. "From my scalp to my bowels," McManus tells us, "I shuddered."
TRAVEL
By Josh Noel and Josh Noel,Chicago Tribune | December 21, 2008
ROCHESTER, Minn. - It's the town full of tourists who don't want to be here. Because who wants to get sick? Who wants to watch a loved one slip away? But that's why they come to this small city in southeastern Minnesota's rolling bluff country, where Midwestern friendliness is as abundant as fresh air. It's all about the Mayo Clinic. And that makes the Midwestern friendliness as key to local tourism as hotel rooms and restaurants. When local residents ride past on bicycles on the sidewalk, they apologize.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Jonathan Bor and Stephanie Desmon and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporters | May 24, 2008
Despite Sen. John McCain's three bouts with melanoma - including a surgery in 2000 that left his cheek visibly scarred - the presumptive Republican presidential nominee's doctors yesterday declared him cancer-free and in general good health. The Arizona senator's medical history puts him at increased risk for future skin cancer, so he sees his dermatologist at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., every three to four months. This year, he had a minor skin cancer removed from his lower leg. "At the present time, Senator McCain enjoys excellent health and displays extraordinary energy," Dr. John D. Eckstein, McCain's internist at the Mayo Clinic, told reporters yesterday.
NEWS
By Jim Jaffe | April 10, 2008
News this week that treating a dying Medicare patient at the Johns Hopkins Hospital costs 60 percent more than care at the Mayo Clinic - without yielding any extra health benefits - prompted Congressional Budget Office Director Peter R. Orszag to suggest health care may be "the least efficient sector of our economy." The problem isn't that expensive hospitals charge more for a given test or procedure, but rather that they do a lot more of them. Efficiency means doing fewer marginal ones.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY M. PHELPS AND TOM BRUNE and TIMOTHY M. PHELPS AND TOM BRUNE,NEWSDAY | May 6, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In the latest incident involving the sometimes troubled Kennedy clan, Rep. Patrick J. Kennedy headed yesterday to the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota for treatment for addiction after a minor late-night accident that he acknowledged he did not remember. Kennedy, a Rhode Island Democrat, did not explicitly say in a statement yesterday what addiction treatment he was seeking, but he announced for the first time that he had also checked himself into the Mayo Clinic over Christmas for addiction to prescription pain medication.
NEWS
By JAY NEUGEBOREN and JAY NEUGEBOREN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 12, 2006
Physical: An American Checkup James McManus Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 255 pages / $24 About two-thirds of the way through Physical: An American Checkup, James McManus' account of events preceding and following a three-day, $8,484.25 physical he undergoes at the Mayo Clinic, McManus receives a call from his wife, Jennifer: At a children's birthday party, their 5-year-old daughter, Grace, has had her eye punctured by a two-pronged wire sticking out from the end of a magic wand. "From my scalp to my bowels," McManus tells us, "I shuddered."
NEWS
August 15, 2004
If you spend much time sitting at a computer, you'll likely experience aches and pains. On average, your body can tolerate being in one position for only 20 minutes before you feel the need to adjust for comfort. -- Mayo Clinic
NEWS
By TIMOTHY M. PHELPS AND TOM BRUNE and TIMOTHY M. PHELPS AND TOM BRUNE,NEWSDAY | May 6, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In the latest incident involving the sometimes troubled Kennedy clan, Rep. Patrick J. Kennedy headed yesterday to the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota for treatment for addiction after a minor late-night accident that he acknowledged he did not remember. Kennedy, a Rhode Island Democrat, did not explicitly say in a statement yesterday what addiction treatment he was seeking, but he announced for the first time that he had also checked himself into the Mayo Clinic over Christmas for addiction to prescription pain medication.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Outfielder Michael Morse, who finished the season hitless in his last 10 games with the Orioles, will undergo surgery Wednesday to fix a bone outgrowth in his left wrist, according to an industry source. Dr. Richard Berger of the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota will perform the arthroscopic surgery, which will shave the bone. The source said Morse should be able to begin using the wrist again in four weeks and should be back to baseball activities in six to eight weeks, so the pending free agent should be a full go by the start of spring training.
NEWS
By Garret Condon and Garret Condon,Hartford Courant | March 12, 2000
Hey, look on the bright side. If you do, you might just live longer. And, chin up, pal: You could become an optimist. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., have confirmed what many people already believe: Optimists tend to live longer, healthier lives. Researchers looked at a group of 839 patients who had taken a personality test in the early and mid-1960s. The test graded subjects, who then ranged in age from 15 to 84, as optimists or pessimists, depending on how they explained life events.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 8, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- King Hussein of Jordan, the eloquent, British-educated monarch whose 46-year reign delivered this desert kingdom from years of war to a fragile peace, died yesterday in this city where mourners from every walk of life joined his family in waiting for the end.He was 63. The king's eldest son, 37-year-old Abdullah, was sworn in as king. Prince Hamzah, the 18-year-old son of Hussein's fourth and last wife, American-born Queen Noor, was named crown prince. Setting out the line of succession was one of King Hussein's last official acts before returning Jan. 27 to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.
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