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By Linda Dalsimer, Dalsimer_md@verizon.net | April 18, 2013
Don't be alarmed if you hear steam whistles and other loud noises on Saturday, May 4 - they will be emanating from the Fire Museum of Maryland's 36th annual Steam Show . Along with the steam fire engine demonstrations, the show features Dalmatians and draft horses, demonstrations of late-1800s horse-drawn fire engines and rides in an 1899 hose wagon. There will be firefighting contests for the kids, steam engine models to examine and a magician performing inside the museum.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A two-alarm blaze at an adjacent building caused damage to the historic Mayfair Theatre in downtown Baltimore and shut down light rail operations Wednesday afternoon. The fire was reported at about 12:20 p.m. in the rear of a vacant building in the 300 block of W. Franklin St., and fire department spokesman Ian Brennan said that the neighboring theater suffered external damage. "The extent of the internal damage is not known as far as the Mayfair building itself," Brennan said.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | November 4, 1993
Baltimore's Mayfair Theater may reopen as a performing and media arts center affiliated with Towson State University as part of the Schmoke administration's campaign to make Howard Street a thriving "avenue of the arts."The Baltimore Development Corp. has been working with Towson State representatives to explore ideas for renovating the theater at 506 N. Howard St. and the adjacent Congress Hotel at 306 W. Franklin St., properties that have been vacant for several years.The city-owned theater is one of three downtown theaters for which local groups are exploring arts-related restoration plans.
NEWS
By Linda Dalsimer, Dalsimer_md@verizon.net | April 18, 2013
Don't be alarmed if you hear steam whistles and other loud noises on Saturday, May 4 - they will be emanating from the Fire Museum of Maryland's 36th annual Steam Show . Along with the steam fire engine demonstrations, the show features Dalmatians and draft horses, demonstrations of late-1800s horse-drawn fire engines and rides in an 1899 hose wagon. There will be firefighting contests for the kids, steam engine models to examine and a magician performing inside the museum.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 2, 1998
VALENCIA, Calif. -- Proving once that golf is indeed a quirky game, a slightly roundish, middle-aged (by golf standards) son of a car dealer beat the best player in the world (by popular opinion) in a sudden-death playoff in the Nissan Open.Go figure. Billy Mayfair can't hit the ball as far as Tiger Woods, he can't wear as many swooshes and he can't pump his fist after willing putts into the hole nearly as well as Woods.But out there at Valencia Country Club, where the greens look like there are a few Volkswagens buried under the grass, all Mayfair did yesterday was shoot a 4-under-par 67, birdie the last hole of regulation to tie Woods, then beat him with another birdie on the first playoff hole.
NEWS
July 12, 1998
THE ROOF of the Mayfair Theater has collapsed, and the 128-year-old landmark may come down soon, along with two adjoining buildings at Howard and Franklin streets. That's the word from city officials who had hoped to restore and redevelop the corner, including the old Congress Hotel.The Mayfair, which closed in 1986, is a harbinger of things to come. All over Baltimore, vacant, architecturally notable buildings are reaching a point where they cannot be restored. One prime example is the castle-like American Brewery building in the 1700 block of Gay St., which seems destined for the wrecker's ball.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1998
WHILE state officials prepare to save one of downtown Baltimore's grand old theaters, the Hippodrome, another may soon face its own Armageddon.The vacant Mayfair Theater at 506-514 N. Howard St., a city-owned property dating from 1870, is in danger because its roof collapsed this year and the interior is open to the elements.M. Jay Brodie, president of the Baltimore Development Corp., the agency that oversees downtown development, said he learned of the roof collapse recently.Brodie said his agency has commissioned an engineer to determine whether the building can be salvaged and he hopes to have a report soon.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | July 6, 1995
Mayfair Partners L.P. of Falls Church, Va., and an investment partner have acquired 10 Baltimore-area Boston Markets, cafeterias offering home-style rotisserie chicken and turkey, and plan to open another 10 in the area over the next three years, officials said.Mayfair Partners was joined in the venture by McLean, Va.-based HAIFinance Corp. in acquiring Superior Foods of Maryland Inc., the Annapolis company that operated the 10 restaurants, which are franchises of Colorado-based Boston Chicken Inc. The acquisition also includes two Rochester, N.Y., stores.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | June 19, 2007
The Baltimore Development Corp. has received eight proposals to develop apartments, shops, parking and a hotel at four sites that would expand the city's west-side revitalization. The city's development agency is reviewing proposals to renovate municipally owned vacant buildings in the 400 and 500 blocks of N. Howard St. and in the 300 block W. Franklin St. The properties, including the former Mayfair Theater, lie in an urban renewal area that has Seton Hill on the west and Mount Vernon to the east.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Staff Writer | September 28, 1993
BOOK REVIEWTitle: "Lasher"Author: Anne RicePublisher: KnopfLength, price: 583 pages, $25 First it was vampires. Now it is witches.Just as Anne Rice has kept the story of Lestat alive in the "Vampire Chronicles," she is continuing to breathe life into the Mayfair clan with her newest novel, "Lasher," a fast-paced follow-up to "The Witching Hour.""Lasher" doesn't have to act as a sequel, though. It functions fine as an introduction to the Mayfairs, a dynasty of witches who are anything but stereotypical crones.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | February 3, 2008
Staring at the terra cotta facade of the Mayfair Theater, with its graceful female statues and intricate relief work, Sean MacCarthy is amazed it has survived so much turbulence in the century since it went up. The rest of the historic building on Howard Street has not fared nearly as well. The inside was remodeled again and again, the arched windows were filled with masonry, the mosaic floors were torn up. And, in the final indignity, the roof collapsed in 1998, leaving a two-story-high pile of debris that has not been cleared to this day. But more than 20 years after the Mayfair stopped showing movies, MacCarthy sees new life for a theater left for dead.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | November 10, 2007
My grandmother called it the Auditorium and I knew it as the Mayfair, that venerable Howard Street theater where Lawrence of Arabia and Mary Poppins had local debuts. Closed since 1986, the Mayfair made the news this week: Developers are now ready to make it into apartments. Well, over the years, it's been other things too - in the 1880s a gym called the Natorium, then an Ice Palace (artificial ice), Turkish baths and, after 1905, a fabulous theater that enjoyed a very long run.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2007
Baltimore officials have chosen developers to embark on $27.1 million in projects to rebuild most of two blocks of North Howard Street and expand the city's west side revitalization. Redevelopment of mostly vacant properties, including the former Mayfair Theater, will bring 79 market rate apartments, street-level shops and on-site parking to the 400 and 500 blocks of N. Howard and to the 300 block of W. Franklin streets, the Baltimore Development Corp. said yesterday. Mayfair Development Group, a team from Washington will redevelop three sites in the 400 and 500 blocks of N. Howard St., including the former theater.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | June 19, 2007
The Baltimore Development Corp. has received eight proposals to develop apartments, shops, parking and a hotel at four sites that would expand the city's west-side revitalization. The city's development agency is reviewing proposals to renovate municipally owned vacant buildings in the 400 and 500 blocks of N. Howard St. and in the 300 block W. Franklin St. The properties, including the former Mayfair Theater, lie in an urban renewal area that has Seton Hill on the west and Mount Vernon to the east.
SPORTS
By ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION | November 15, 2005
ATLANTA -- Billy Mayfair stuck his head in a barrel and found peace. All it cost him was $25. He was willing to pay any price to forget the 81 he put up in the third round in Greensboro, N.C., a year ago. In his search for blame, Mayfair found it - his putter. In his search for answers, Mayfair went fishing in that barrel. "Outside Forest Oaks there is this guy who has been there forever with a barrel full of clubs," he said. "I said I'm going to try the belly putter. There was one left."
TRAVEL
By Marion Winik and Marion Winik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 2002
Today I saw a ghost. I saw the white sands of Asbury Park, N.J., filled with bright bikinis, striped umbrellas, children with pails and shovels. Lifeguards on a wooden platform monitored a throng of boogie boarders and wave jumpers, as judges with clipboards and sunglasses reviewed the entries in a sand- castle contest: a mermaid astride a dolphin, a stylish art deco couple kissing inside a deep hole, a bathing beauty. Up on the boardwalk, a queue awaited the next batch of french fries at the Mayfair snack bar. This was not just another day at the beach; it was an out-and-out apparition, for there has been nothing like it in my hometown for a long, long time.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | November 10, 2007
My grandmother called it the Auditorium and I knew it as the Mayfair, that venerable Howard Street theater where Lawrence of Arabia and Mary Poppins had local debuts. Closed since 1986, the Mayfair made the news this week: Developers are now ready to make it into apartments. Well, over the years, it's been other things too - in the 1880s a gym called the Natorium, then an Ice Palace (artificial ice), Turkish baths and, after 1905, a fabulous theater that enjoyed a very long run.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2007
Baltimore officials have chosen developers to embark on $27.1 million in projects to rebuild most of two blocks of North Howard Street and expand the city's west side revitalization. Redevelopment of mostly vacant properties, including the former Mayfair Theater, will bring 79 market rate apartments, street-level shops and on-site parking to the 400 and 500 blocks of N. Howard and to the 300 block of W. Franklin streets, the Baltimore Development Corp. said yesterday. Mayfair Development Group, a team from Washington will redevelop three sites in the 400 and 500 blocks of N. Howard St., including the former theater.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and By Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
The long shuttered Mayfair Theater, a historic playhouse and movie theater on the west side of downtown, could be reborn as an apartment building under a proposal submitted to the city by Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse. Dubbed Auditorium Row, the $7 million proposal calls for the creation of 47 apartment units and two retail spaces in the Mayfair and two buildings to its south in the 500 block of N. Howard St., officials said yesterday The company, which has been active for 20 years in converting vacant buildings into commercial and residential projects, was the only developer to respond to a request for proposals from Baltimore Development Corp.
NEWS
July 19, 1998
Northern principal did what was needed to impose disciplineI am appalled that Alice Morgan-Brown was driven into retirement at Northern High School. All she did was try to restore order to her school.The things she did were much better than a predecessor who rarely came out of his office and was afraid to speak to students. When she came, Northern was in its worst state. What happened this year is small compared with things I had seen six years ago.Not many principals in the Baltimore City school system were or are as bold as she was in taking the measures she took.
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