Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMaury
IN THE NEWS

Maury

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | December 20, 1994
Maury Schwartzman, a tennis pro whose lessons about the game and about life reached a long list of champions during his 60 years of teaching on the courts, died of congestive heart failure Sunday at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. He was 81."Maury was probably the most underrated pro in the country. I think he was one of the best," said Steven Krulevitz, a former All-American, Davis Cup competitor and Schwartzman protege now coaching at the Greenspring Racquet Club.Of Baltimore's four top professional tour players -- Mr. Krulevitz, Elise Burgin, Andrea Leand and Pam Shriver -- Mr. Schwartzman had an early hand in the training of all but the last.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel and For The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Maury Sall Pikesville, junior Pikesville never has been a track power, but junior Maury Sall helped the Panthers win their first state title this winter. Sall won the 500 and 800, and he finished second in the 300 to help coach Adam Hittner's Panthers edge Boonsboro, 110-103, for the Class 1A state championship at the Prince George's Sports and Learning Complex last month. Sall anchored Pikesville's 1,600 relay team that won the meet's final event and clinched the team title.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Ryan Murphy and Ryan Murphy,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 1, 1991
Maury Povich was just another steely-eyed news anchor until sensationalism came to call in the mid-1980s. The show was the tabloidy "A Current Affair," a muckraking syndicated program that offered tantalizing stories on cheerleader hookers and mass murderers who crochet. Mr. Povich's booming bass voice made him a perfect candidate to read aloud the segment's sordid intros. The show became so popular, of course, that Mr. Povich left it. What personality in America today, if offered his or her own talk show, wouldn't jump at the chance?
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
The junior standout led Pikesville to its first Class 1A state championship, winning two races, taking second in another and anchoring a winning relay that clinched the team victory at the Prince George's Sports and Learning Complex in Landover on Feb. 18. Sall captured the 500 and 800 meters, took second in the 300 and finished the victorious 1,600 relay in the final event as the Panthers edged second-place Boonsboro by a 110-102 margin. Sall has enjoyed a dominant indoor season, claiming the 300, 500 and 800 at regions and winning Baltimore County titles in the 300 and 500. Others considered: Juan Brown, Annapolis, basketball; Vince Ciaetti, Perry Hall, indoor track and field; George Flaviano, Digital Harbor, indoor track and field; Daxter Miles, Dunbar, basketball; Jack Mutchnik, St. Paul's, wrestling.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Lawler and Sylvia Lawler,Morning Call | December 5, 1993
Daytime talkmeister Maury Povich manages a twinkle when he talks about David Letterman's late-night obsession with his wife, CBS news anchor Connie Chung."
FEATURES
April 19, 1991
OUT AND ABOUT: The Baltimore Tennis Patrons Association is having a dinner to honor my Guy Friday, Maury Schwartzman, at The Harborcourt Hotel on Friday, April 26, at 7 p.m. Pam Shriver and a former student, Elise Burgin, are among the tennis greats who'll be there to honor him.Schwartzman credits his former neighbor, Howard Kaplan, with stimulating his lifetime interest in tennis. Kaplan gave him a Frank Merriwell paperback book when he won a contest for the youngsters who could hit the most balls in a row.Out of 50 contestants, he hit 165 in a row the very first time he'd ever had a racket his hands, at the age of 12. The racket, incidentally, was an old bludgeon of a hand me down from his uncle, Dr. Abel Wolman.
SPORTS
By BILL TANTON | December 20, 1994
The gloom was everywhere at the Bare Hills Tennis Club off Falls Road yesterday.In the wake of the death of tennis pro Maury Schwartzman, 81, from congestive heart failure on Sunday, there was a void that may never be filled.Schwartzman was the dean of the local teaching pros. For 60 years he taught those beautiful, flowing strokes to Baltimore kids, and later to their kids, and, in some cases, to the grandkids of his original students.On a Sunday 53 years ago this month, Schwartzman and fellow Baltimorean Malcolm Fox were giving a clinic for the midshipmen at the Naval Academy when an officer broke in and terminated the proceedings.
SPORTS
May 25, 1998
Quote: "Yep, I'm joining you baseball writers. I've finally hit rock bottom." -- former Orioles manager Davey Johnson, who is writing a baseball column on the Internet.It's a fact: Cleveland was shut out for the second time in eight days and third this season -- all on Sundays.Who's hot: The Blue Jays' Woody Williams has allowed eight hits and two runs in 22 innings for an 0.82 ERA in his past three starts.Who's not: The Red Sox's Bret Saberhagen, who began the season 5-0, has an ERA of 11.84 in his past five starts.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | April 30, 1991
HARBOR COURT HOTEL was the scene of a "Smashing Celebration" honoring Maury Schwartzman, Baltimore's veteran tennis coach. Maury, who has taught some of Baltimore's best known citizens how to play tennis during the last 50 years, was hailed over the weekend for his special dedication to coaching junior athletes.Among those who came to the party were Maury's wife, Judy, and daughters and sons-in-laws Dr. and Mrs. Peyton Jones and Mr. and Mrs. Michael Schudel. Others holding forth at their tables were Pam Shriver, Jeff Lamborn, Elise Burgin and Harold Burgin, Dr. and Mrs. Earl Galleher Jr, Brooke Gorman, Buzzy Hettleman, Harry and Dal Ratrie, Lenny Schloss and Henry and Nancy Hopkins.
NEWS
November 25, 2007
JANE MAURY DENTON, 81 Wife of former senator Jane Maury Denton, the wife of former Sen. Jeremiah Denton Jr., a former Vietnam prisoner of war, died Thursday at a Norfolk, Va., hospital after suffering a heart attack, family members said. She helped organize the National League of Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia in the 1960s, after her Navy pilot husband was shot down and captured in 1965. He was held for nearly eight years in a North Vietnamese prison. Mrs. Denton's advocacy work was credited for the group's efforts in obtaining humane treatment and the ultimate release of American prisoners.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2011
The man who escaped from a Baltimore jail last week has been captured in western Pennsylvania, a state official said. The U.S. Marshals Service took Maury Figueroa, 29, into custody without incident, said Mark A. Vernarelli, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, in a Friday statement. Figueroa escaped from Baltimore Central Booking and Intake Center on Nov. 9. He escaped while working on a sanitation detail and climbed a fence in an employee parking lot, officials said.
NEWS
November 25, 2007
JANE MAURY DENTON, 81 Wife of former senator Jane Maury Denton, the wife of former Sen. Jeremiah Denton Jr., a former Vietnam prisoner of war, died Thursday at a Norfolk, Va., hospital after suffering a heart attack, family members said. She helped organize the National League of Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia in the 1960s, after her Navy pilot husband was shot down and captured in 1965. He was held for nearly eight years in a North Vietnamese prison. Mrs. Denton's advocacy work was credited for the group's efforts in obtaining humane treatment and the ultimate release of American prisoners.
NEWS
By Sue du Pont and Sue du Pont,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 2001
ON ANY GIVEN weekend and on many warm summer weeknights on the Chesapeake Bay, white sails appear to float atop the water, pulling dozens, sometimes hundreds, of hulls around courses marked by bright orange buoys. These sailboat races are most often sponsored and produced by local yacht clubs. Some are more formal than others. The West River Catamaran Racing Association (WRCRA) based in Galesville in South Anne Arundel County is decidedly on the less formal - but no less competitive - side of racing.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 10, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- When is enough enough? With last night's debut of NBC's "Twenty One" and the return of ABC's "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?" there are now four prime-time game shows on network television. And, while that might seem like more than enough considering last year at this time there were none, producers and network programmers say the end is nowhere in sight. "It's like crack [cocaine]. Once you're on it, it's wonderful," said Garth Ancier, NBC's president of entertainment.
SPORTS
May 25, 1998
Quote: "Yep, I'm joining you baseball writers. I've finally hit rock bottom." -- former Orioles manager Davey Johnson, who is writing a baseball column on the Internet.It's a fact: Cleveland was shut out for the second time in eight days and third this season -- all on Sundays.Who's hot: The Blue Jays' Woody Williams has allowed eight hits and two runs in 22 innings for an 0.82 ERA in his past three starts.Who's not: The Red Sox's Bret Saberhagen, who began the season 5-0, has an ERA of 11.84 in his past five starts.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 1998
Bishop John Maury Allin, the 23rd presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church, who was a pivotal supporter of Mississippi's NTC effort to rebuild burned black churches in the 1960s but was an ardent critic of the ordination of women, died Friday in Jackson, Miss.He was 77 and had been struggling with complications from a stroke he suffered a week before his death. He also had lung cancer.Bishop Allin was elected presiding bishop in 1973 and served in that position until he retired in 1986. Often called John the 23rd by those who knew him well, he was chosen to lead the church during one of its most divisive periods, as factions were beginning to press for the inclusion of blacks and women.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | April 27, 1991
Maury Schwartzman never met a backhand he couldn't fix.His career teaching tennis in Baltimore spans more than 50 years. He never wanted to be a big-shot coach, one of those forever-tanned California guys who hobnobbed with the Hollywood stars, and then made the scene at Newport and Forest Hills.The public courts at Druid Hill Park were his domain. Twelve months a year. Sun, wind and rain wouldn't stop him. Not even snow. He'd take a shovel, clear two courts and give his lessons.He always wanted to be around the kids just learning the game, guiding players who are grabbing on to a dream that might take them to college, or the international circuit.
NEWS
By Sue du Pont and Sue du Pont,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 2001
ON ANY GIVEN weekend and on many warm summer weeknights on the Chesapeake Bay, white sails appear to float atop the water, pulling dozens, sometimes hundreds, of hulls around courses marked by bright orange buoys. These sailboat races are most often sponsored and produced by local yacht clubs. Some are more formal than others. The West River Catamaran Racing Association (WRCRA) based in Galesville in South Anne Arundel County is decidedly on the less formal - but no less competitive - side of racing.
FEATURES
By David Kronke and David Kronke,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 1997
LOS ANGELES -- The good news: Before it had even released a movie, DreamWorks SKG had won an Academy Award.The bad news: It was for a failed TV pilot. "Dear Diary," a sitcom starring Bebe Neuwirth that had been rejected by the networks, won this year's Best Short Film Oscar.Ah, well, the test begins in earnest today, when DreamWorks, the first new major Hollywood studio in 60 years, releases its premier film, "The Peacemaker," a political thriller starring George Clooney and Nicole Kidman.
SPORTS
By BILL TANTON | December 20, 1994
The gloom was everywhere at the Bare Hills Tennis Club off Falls Road yesterday.In the wake of the death of tennis pro Maury Schwartzman, 81, from congestive heart failure on Sunday, there was a void that may never be filled.Schwartzman was the dean of the local teaching pros. For 60 years he taught those beautiful, flowing strokes to Baltimore kids, and later to their kids, and, in some cases, to the grandkids of his original students.On a Sunday 53 years ago this month, Schwartzman and fellow Baltimorean Malcolm Fox were giving a clinic for the midshipmen at the Naval Academy when an officer broke in and terminated the proceedings.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.