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By DAN RODRICKS | October 27, 1997
A long period of sleeplessness, back in the 1980s, had me up at night, staring out rowhouse windows, listening to street sounds, wondering about the world. That's when I first started listening to Bill Feldman on WBJC-FM. He became to me, for a time, what he was to some people for years -- a quiet overnight companion who shared his love of classical music with strangers listening in the dark.Once I visited his lonely studio at the Community College of Baltimore during the wee hours and found him answering the phone, taking requests, hunting up discs in the WBJC music library.
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By DAN RODRICKS | October 27, 1997
A long period of sleeplessness, back in the 1980s, had me up at night, staring out rowhouse windows, listening to street sounds, wondering about the world. That's when I first started listening to Bill Feldman on WBJC-FM. He became to me, for a time, what he was to some people for years -- a quiet overnight companion who shared his love of classical music with strangers listening in the dark.Once I visited his lonely studio at the Community College of Baltimore during the wee hours and found him answering the phone, taking requests, hunting up discs in the WBJC music library.
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TRAVEL
April 22, 2010
Here are some highlights of the 2010 Virginia Arts Festival: Friday and Saturday in Norfolk: A staging of Leonard Bernstein's "Mass," Reduced Shakespeare Company, jazz trombonist John Fedchock April 27 in Norfolk: Classical guitarist David Russell April 28 in Portsmouth: The Venice Baroque Orchestra, directed by Andrea Marcon and featuring violinist Giuliano Carmignola, performs works by Vivaldi, Tartini and Albinoni....
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | September 8, 1991
One of the best things about living in Baltimore is that you can get to New York in 2 1/2 hours, Washington in 45 minutes and Philadelphia in 75. Here is a sampling of the many concerts in those cities worth making the trip for:WASHINGTON*Nobody plays Mozart's piano concertos better than Murray Perahia, who will perform and conduct three of them (K. 413, 482 and 503) with the Orpheus Chamber Ensemble at the Kennedy Center on Oct. 6.NEW YORK*The great Kurt Masur is the New York Philharmonic's new music director, and his presence has made the orchestra a hot ticket for the first time since the Bernstein era ended more than 20 years ago. One of Masur's greatest strengths is Bruckner, and it's no accident that this composer's mighty Symphony No. 7 -- along with music by John Adams and Aaron Copland -- is featured in the orchestra's first concerts with Masur (Sept.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 10, 2005
The Washington Performing Arts Society will mark its 40th anniversary season with the premiere of a gospel work commissioned for the occasion and the presentation of a cross-section of classical and jazz talent. The 2005-2006 lineup includes a dozen events in the newly opened Music Center at Strathmore, as well as several dozen more at the Kennedy Center and other Washington venues. Although WPAS recently cut back on the quantity of touring orchestras it presents, the quality of the list remains high.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 17, 2004
The Washington Performing Arts Society, the area's premier presenter of classical, dance, jazz and world-music events, will do some major expansion - and a little contraction - for the 2004-2005 season. With the opening of the Music Center at Strathmore, WPAS will add one more venue to a list that already includes the Kennedy Center, George Washington University and DAR Constitution Hall. This addition will help boost the annual budget from $7.2 million to $8.1 million. The Strathmore season, beginning February 2005, offers such stellar artists as violinist Itzhak Perlman, pianist Evgeny Kissin, the Emerson String Quartet and the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra with soprano Barbara Bonney.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 23, 2006
The Concert Artists of Baltimore, a combination of choral and orchestral forces, routinely provides some of the most imaginative programming and most engaging performances in the region. The finale to the ensemble's 19th season reiterated that point Saturday night at the Gordon Center in Owings Mills. There was the novelty of juxtaposing a grand warhorse, Brahms' sweeping Piano Concerto No. 2, with rarely encountered works by 20th-century Argentine composers. And there was the intensity of the music-making, so impressive that I wished more people were in the hall to hear it. (Maybe some folks can't believe there could be such quality outside Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, let alone outside the Beltway.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 18, 1996
Beethoven's "Kreutzer" Sonata not only inspired the great piece of short fiction by Tolstoy that bears its name, but also a countless number of sexy perfume ads. The first movement, particularly, reaches an extraordinary (even for Beethoven) peak passion and fury. The way that violinist Pamela Frank and pianist Claude Frank performed this work Saturday night in the Shriver Hall Concert Series made it easy to understand why the deranged narrator of Tolstoy's novella says this music is dangerous and irrational and that it leads inevitably to adultery and murder.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 7, 1995
Franz Schubert, Piano Sonatas in A minor (D. 537) and A major (D. 959), performed by Andras Schiff (London 440 309-2); Schubert, Piano Sonata in A major (D. 959) and Klavierstucke Nos. 1-3 (D. 946), performed by Frank Braley (Les Nouveaux Interpretes HMN 911546).Schiff's coupling of Schubert's great A major sonata and the much earlier A minor work is the fifth volume in his projected seven-CD set of the composer's sonatas, and it is one of the greatest things this Hungarian-born musician has done.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 6, 1999
One of the interesting things about growing older is watching people develop.In my business that means keeping track of promising musicians. It's usually (and sadly) the case that great talents do not necessarily mature into great artists. A celebrated example is pianist Van Cliburn, whose playing began to decline precipitously before he was 30.At least Cliburn had some genuinely great years. For every Martha Argerich, Maurizio Pollini, Lynn Harrell, Nathan Milstein or David Oistrakh who continues to develop artistically as he or she grows older, I can probably name four to five musicians -- each of whom was comparably talented -- whose name you've never heard or probably forgotten.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 26, 1996
Beethoven's music is about heroism -- the composer's, the performer's and the audience's.That was evident this spring when Maurizio Pollini finished his seven-concert survey of Beethoven's 32 piano sonatas in Carnegie Hall and received one of the greatest ovations in the hall's history. The audience was applauding Pollini for his mastery of the greatest challenges -- physical, intellectual and artistic -- in the sonata literature. It was only the third time since Carnegie opened in 1890 that a pianist had managed to complete an entire Beethoven cycle.
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