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By Dave Rosenthal | May 8, 2012
The death of Maurice Sendak , author of "Where the Wild Things Are" and other wonderful children's books, is a great loss for children's literature. His books, which included "In the Night Kitchen," "Alligators All Around," and the Little Bear books, were favorite reads for my children. Each one carried just the right tone of whimsy, and the illustrations had a classic beauty. Sendak also had a wicked sense of humor, judging from the interview he gave Stephen Colbert early this year.
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By Dave Rosenthal | September 22, 2012
Flavorwire has put together an interesting gallery of photos of authors in their young, pre-fame days. Some drip with irony: a smiling Sylvia Plath, and Jack Kerouac (in a tie!) at Horace Mann. Others are disarmingly cute: Samuel Beckett on his high school cricket team, Madeleine L'Engle in her Smith College yearbook, and J.D. Salinger at military school. One of the yearbook entries -- for Maurice Sendak -- is prescient. It reads: Your delightful drawings make us all gay/A famous arftist you'll be someday. 
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By Dave Rosenthal | January 25, 2012
Popular children's author Maurice Sendak (shown here delivering a 2004 commencement speech at Goucher College) was the subject of a hilarious interview on The Colbert Report last night, touching on topics from Newt Gingrich (he wasn't kind) and kids (he was a little kinder). Some examples of the back-and-forth in part one of Stephen Colbert's interview with the author of classics such as "Where the Wild Things Are" : Colbert: Let's talk about kids. I don't trust 'em. They're just biding their time until we're gone, and then they get our stuff.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
It was pure coincidence that Maurice Sendak died on the same day that North Carolina voters approved an amendment to their state constitution banning gay marriage. And the same day that Joe Biden was in the hot seat for his comment over the weekend that he is "comfortable" with marriage equality. One wouldn't know from reading The Sun's appreciation that Mr. Sendak was gay. He lived with his partner, psychoanalyst Eugene Glynn, for 50 years until Glynn's death in 2007, according to a 2009 article in the New York Times.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
It was pure coincidence that Maurice Sendak died on the same day that North Carolina voters approved an amendment to their state constitution banning gay marriage. And the same day that Joe Biden was in the hot seat for his comment over the weekend that he is "comfortable" with marriage equality. One wouldn't know from reading The Sun's appreciation that Mr. Sendak was gay. He lived with his partner, psychoanalyst Eugene Glynn, for 50 years until Glynn's death in 2007, according to a 2009 article in the New York Times.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | May 9, 2012
Not everything in childhood is bowls of mush and little old ladies whispering "Hush," and Maurice Sendak understood that. Our children understand that, too. Instinctively. That's what makes his books, like "Where the Wild Things Are" and "In the Night Kitchen" such a delicious experience for them. They could feel that frisson of fear and adventure without ever leaving the crook of Mommy's arm. This was especially true for our sons, who found kindred spirts in the unruly little boys of Sendak's stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Somewhere the wild things are roaring their terrible roars and gnashing their terrible teeth and rolling their terrible eyes and showing their terrible claws. They're mourning their creator, children's book author Maurice Sendak, who stepped into his private boat on Tuesday and waved goodbye. The 83-year-old Sendak died Tuesday morning at a hospital in Connecticut, four days after suffering a stroke. "When I heard the news on the radio, it was just a punch in the gut," said Selma Levi, who supervises the children's department of the Central Branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library . "I know he was older.
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By Dave Rosenthal | September 22, 2012
Flavorwire has put together an interesting gallery of photos of authors in their young, pre-fame days. Some drip with irony: a smiling Sylvia Plath, and Jack Kerouac (in a tie!) at Horace Mann. Others are disarmingly cute: Samuel Beckett on his high school cricket team, Madeleine L'Engle in her Smith College yearbook, and J.D. Salinger at military school. One of the yearbook entries -- for Maurice Sendak -- is prescient. It reads: Your delightful drawings make us all gay/A famous arftist you'll be someday. 
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By Dave Rosenthal | February 21, 2012
A flurry of new children's books is headed for the shelves, and the authors carry some very familiar names, including Stephen Colbert. A look at the future: -- Colbert's book, "I Am a Pole (And So Can You!)" is scheduled for a May 8 release, according to USA Today . The article notes that the tale, mentioned in his January interview with author Maurice Sendak, became an Internet sensation. "It's been a lifelong dream of mine to write a children's book. I hope the minutes you and your loved ones spend reading it are as fulfilling as the minutes I spent writing it," Colbert said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gina Kazimir and Gina Kazimir,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 28, 2002
WHEN you want to see a major arts performance, where do you go? The Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the Lyric Opera House, the Mechanic Theatre or Center Stage, right? You expect top-notch productions at those Baltimore venues, but they aren't the only major players on the area's cultural-arts scene. In the past several years, the number of regional arts facilities in our area has grown remarkably. With sneak previews of critically acclaimed ballets, performances by renowned musicians and exciting new dance and theater productions, these arts centers offer an ideal way to expand your cultural horizons, often for little or no cost.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | May 9, 2012
Not everything in childhood is bowls of mush and little old ladies whispering "Hush," and Maurice Sendak understood that. Our children understand that, too. Instinctively. That's what makes his books, like "Where the Wild Things Are" and "In the Night Kitchen" such a delicious experience for them. They could feel that frisson of fear and adventure without ever leaving the crook of Mommy's arm. This was especially true for our sons, who found kindred spirts in the unruly little boys of Sendak's stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Somewhere the wild things are roaring their terrible roars and gnashing their terrible teeth and rolling their terrible eyes and showing their terrible claws. They're mourning their creator, children's book author Maurice Sendak, who stepped into his private boat on Tuesday and waved goodbye. The 83-year-old Sendak died Tuesday morning at a hospital in Connecticut, four days after suffering a stroke. "When I heard the news on the radio, it was just a punch in the gut," said Selma Levi, who supervises the children's department of the Central Branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library . "I know he was older.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | May 8, 2012
The death of Maurice Sendak , author of "Where the Wild Things Are" and other wonderful children's books, is a great loss for children's literature. His books, which included "In the Night Kitchen," "Alligators All Around," and the Little Bear books, were favorite reads for my children. Each one carried just the right tone of whimsy, and the illustrations had a classic beauty. Sendak also had a wicked sense of humor, judging from the interview he gave Stephen Colbert early this year.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | February 21, 2012
A flurry of new children's books is headed for the shelves, and the authors carry some very familiar names, including Stephen Colbert. A look at the future: -- Colbert's book, "I Am a Pole (And So Can You!)" is scheduled for a May 8 release, according to USA Today . The article notes that the tale, mentioned in his January interview with author Maurice Sendak, became an Internet sensation. "It's been a lifelong dream of mine to write a children's book. I hope the minutes you and your loved ones spend reading it are as fulfilling as the minutes I spent writing it," Colbert said in a statement.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 25, 2012
Popular children's author Maurice Sendak (shown here delivering a 2004 commencement speech at Goucher College) was the subject of a hilarious interview on The Colbert Report last night, touching on topics from Newt Gingrich (he wasn't kind) and kids (he was a little kinder). Some examples of the back-and-forth in part one of Stephen Colbert's interview with the author of classics such as "Where the Wild Things Are" : Colbert: Let's talk about kids. I don't trust 'em. They're just biding their time until we're gone, and then they get our stuff.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2004
College presidents typically greet their keynote commencement speakers with a handshake and then sit down. But yesterday at Goucher College, President Sanford J. Unger didn't yield when Maurice Sendak approached the podium. Instead, Unger launched into an interview of the famed children's author - something the former National Public Radio host had first done nearly 22 years ago. "What we talked about has resonated with me ever since, which is the importance in life - the importance for children, in particular - to learn how to be afraid," Unger said.
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By Molly Dunham JTC and Molly Dunham JTC,Evening Sun Staff | December 12, 1990
HOLIDAYS ARE still a time for families, though they sometimes get lost amid the hassles. Adults are harried, their voices rising as a dozen cousins argue over which Nintendo cartridge to play next. Grandparents make their once-a-year appearances, bearing gifts and often leaving with a bit of melancholy.OK, so maybe Barry Levinson is right: We can't go back to ''Avalon,'' to the days when kids crowded around Grandfather to hear stories about the family's history.Yet even if it's too late to save the extended family from extinction, it couldn't hurt to bring back a storytelling tradition.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2003
Parents and children alike remember reading Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are. After an evening of mischief, Max was "sent to bed without eating anything. That very night in Max's room a forest grew and grew and grew until his ceiling hung with vines and the walls became the world all around and an ocean tumbled by with a private boat for Max and he sailed off through night and day and in and out of weeks and almost over a year to where the wild things are." Philadelphia's Rosenbach Museum and Library hosts the exhibit Let the Wild Rumpus Start!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gina Kazimir and Gina Kazimir,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 28, 2002
WHEN you want to see a major arts performance, where do you go? The Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the Lyric Opera House, the Mechanic Theatre or Center Stage, right? You expect top-notch productions at those Baltimore venues, but they aren't the only major players on the area's cultural-arts scene. In the past several years, the number of regional arts facilities in our area has grown remarkably. With sneak previews of critically acclaimed ballets, performances by renowned musicians and exciting new dance and theater productions, these arts centers offer an ideal way to expand your cultural horizons, often for little or no cost.
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