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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 24, 2008
An irresistible, possibly apocryphal anecdote finds George Gershwin in Paris asking Maurice Ravel for lessons on orchestration. Ravel's reply: "Why should I turn you into a second-rate Ravel when you are already a first-rate Gershwin?" If you go The BSO performs at 11 a.m. today at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $15-$57. Call 410-783-8000 or go to bsomusic.org.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Officially, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's 2013-14 season opened last week. Musically, I'd say it really got going last night, when the ensemble kicked into high gear to deliver sterling performances of works by Leonard Bernstein and Maurice Ravel. Music director Marin Alsop has given Bernstein, her mentor, a prominent place in the BSO's programming and discography -- a Naxos recording of his compelling "Mass" earned a Grammy nomination a few years ago. This week, Alsop is focusing on the composer's Symphony No. 2, "Age of Anxiety," which Naxos will record during concerts at Meyerhoff Hall Friday and Saturday.
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February 9, 2007
French masterpieces -- Sundays At Three Chamber Music Series will present Masterpieces of French Chamber Music, performed by pianist Brian Ganz (above); violinists Ronald Mutchnik, Claudia Chudacoff and Peter Sirotin; violist Julius Wirth and cellist Fiona Thompson at 3 p.m. Sunday at Christ Episcopal Church, 5800 Oakland Mills Road, Columbia. Works by Cesar Frank, Maurice Ravel and Ernest Chausson are on the program. Tickets are $15; $10 for unaccompanied full-time students. Children and youth to age 18 are admitted free when accompanied by an adult.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | May 8, 2013
The Columbia Orchestra knows how to fill the stage with musicians, but it also knows that a much smaller ensemble also can be music to the ears. That's why its season provides a mix of concerts deploying the full orchestra and other concerts that adopt a chamber music format. Where the latter format is concerned, you'll only count three musicians when the Columbia Orchestra Piano Trio performs a free concert on Saturday, May 11 at 7:30 p.m. at Christ Episcopal Church, in Columbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | January 4, 2007
Sweet sounds The lowdown -- Truly new things don't come around in the music business all that often, so when Quartetto Gelato hit the classical/crossover scene about a decade ago, attention was paid. This foursome, which started in Canada and enjoys an international fan base, handles eight diverse instruments; the violin and mandolin player also happens to be a tenor, so there's a vocal element in the programming, too. The group typically explores a diverting repertoire, which it will do in a program with an "Orient Express" theme presented by Candlelight Concerts in Columbia, including musical stops in London (a Flanders and Swann song)
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | May 8, 2013
The Columbia Orchestra knows how to fill the stage with musicians, but it also knows that a much smaller ensemble also can be music to the ears. That's why its season provides a mix of concerts deploying the full orchestra and other concerts that adopt a chamber music format. Where the latter format is concerned, you'll only count three musicians when the Columbia Orchestra Piano Trio performs a free concert on Saturday, May 11 at 7:30 p.m. at Christ Episcopal Church, in Columbia.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 1999
What do an old castle, an ox cart, unhatched chicks, a bustling French marketplace, two Jewish people, and a grand design for a never-built czarist monument have in common?Classical music aficionados can answer that one easily.These are just some of the scenes captured in the paintings and drawings of Russian artist Victor Hartmann -- images that would inspire the artist's friend Modest Mussorgsky (1839-1881)to compose the most famous museum stroll in the history of music.Linked by a catchy "Promenade" theme that depicts an art-lover determinedly on the move, Mussorgsky's suite of 10 piano pieces inspired by Hartmann's art became "Pictures at an Exhibition," a work still considered one of the great romantic showpieces composed for the keyboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Officially, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's 2013-14 season opened last week. Musically, I'd say it really got going last night, when the ensemble kicked into high gear to deliver sterling performances of works by Leonard Bernstein and Maurice Ravel. Music director Marin Alsop has given Bernstein, her mentor, a prominent place in the BSO's programming and discography -- a Naxos recording of his compelling "Mass" earned a Grammy nomination a few years ago. This week, Alsop is focusing on the composer's Symphony No. 2, "Age of Anxiety," which Naxos will record during concerts at Meyerhoff Hall Friday and Saturday.
FEATURES
November 14, 2006
Concert Chamber Players The Towson Chamber Players perform classical music such as Francois Francoeur's five-movement Sonata for Piano and Cello and Maurice Ravel's Chansons Madecasses at 7:30 p.m. at Towson University, Cen ter for the Fine Arts, Cross Campus and Olser drives. $13 for general admission, $7 for seniors, $5 for students. 410-704-2787 or towson.edu/centerfor thearts.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 28, 2003
Masterpieces from the musical traditions of France and Russia, along with contemporary American fare and three of the great concertos from the classical canon, will dominate the Columbia Orchestra's 26th season in Howard County. "We have excellent soloists, a variety of styles and a lot of ear-catching music to share," says conductor Jason Love. "We're excited about the season." A pair of great valedictory works highlights the opening concert Oct. 18, when the orchestra will perform the super-charged Pathetique symphony of Tchaikovsky and Elgar's last major work, the autumnal Concerto for Cello and Orchestra.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 24, 2008
An irresistible, possibly apocryphal anecdote finds George Gershwin in Paris asking Maurice Ravel for lessons on orchestration. Ravel's reply: "Why should I turn you into a second-rate Ravel when you are already a first-rate Gershwin?" If you go The BSO performs at 11 a.m. today at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $15-$57. Call 410-783-8000 or go to bsomusic.org.
NEWS
February 9, 2007
French masterpieces -- Sundays At Three Chamber Music Series will present Masterpieces of French Chamber Music, performed by pianist Brian Ganz (above); violinists Ronald Mutchnik, Claudia Chudacoff and Peter Sirotin; violist Julius Wirth and cellist Fiona Thompson at 3 p.m. Sunday at Christ Episcopal Church, 5800 Oakland Mills Road, Columbia. Works by Cesar Frank, Maurice Ravel and Ernest Chausson are on the program. Tickets are $15; $10 for unaccompanied full-time students. Children and youth to age 18 are admitted free when accompanied by an adult.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | January 4, 2007
Sweet sounds The lowdown -- Truly new things don't come around in the music business all that often, so when Quartetto Gelato hit the classical/crossover scene about a decade ago, attention was paid. This foursome, which started in Canada and enjoys an international fan base, handles eight diverse instruments; the violin and mandolin player also happens to be a tenor, so there's a vocal element in the programming, too. The group typically explores a diverting repertoire, which it will do in a program with an "Orient Express" theme presented by Candlelight Concerts in Columbia, including musical stops in London (a Flanders and Swann song)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 1999
What do an old castle, an ox cart, unhatched chicks, a bustling French marketplace, two Jewish people, and a grand design for a never-built czarist monument have in common?Classical music aficionados can answer that one easily.These are just some of the scenes captured in the paintings and drawings of Russian artist Victor Hartmann -- images that would inspire the artist's friend Modest Mussorgsky (1839-1881)to compose the most famous museum stroll in the history of music.Linked by a catchy "Promenade" theme that depicts an art-lover determinedly on the move, Mussorgsky's suite of 10 piano pieces inspired by Hartmann's art became "Pictures at an Exhibition," a work still considered one of the great romantic showpieces composed for the keyboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | February 24, 2002
There's nothing like Hungarian music to get the blood flowing. The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, joined for part of the program by some of Maryland's top young musicians, will be reveling in gypsy airs and dances this week. Music by two of Hungary's finest composers, Zoltan Kodaly (the spirited Dances of Galanta) and Ernest von Dohnanyi (Serenade), will be featured. And, of course, there will be selections from Johannes Brahms' Hungarian Dances. It is here that the BCO will have company onstage.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 2000
St. John's College will present one of America's young, up-and-coming string quartets in a free concert at 8:15 p.m. tomorrow at Francis Scott Key Auditorium on the Annapolis campus. The Cypress String Quartet - Cecily Ward and Tom Stone, violins; Ann Gregg, viola; and Jennifer Kloetzel, cello - was formed in 1996. Winner of the 1999 Chamber Music Yellow Springs Competition, the quartet received special mention in a recent issue of Chamber Music Magazine as a "Generation X ensemble to watch."
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