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Maureen O Sullivan

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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
The lab is "a fun place," the eighth-grade girls say in the article, and I utter a low growl at fun  as an adjective, but let it go.  It has become a common as kudzu in Georgia, and there is nothing to be done about it except to hope that, like other vogue usages, it will eventually fade away. My own attitude toward fun was shaped in my youth by Paul Ford in a 1965 movie, Never Too Late . The gimmick is that Ford, a middle-aged man whose grown and recently married daughter (Connie Stevens)
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
The lab is "a fun place," the eighth-grade girls say in the article, and I utter a low growl at fun  as an adjective, but let it go.  It has become a common as kudzu in Georgia, and there is nothing to be done about it except to hope that, like other vogue usages, it will eventually fade away. My own attitude toward fun was shaped in my youth by Paul Ford in a 1965 movie, Never Too Late . The gimmick is that Ford, a middle-aged man whose grown and recently married daughter (Connie Stevens)
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 14, 1997
Brendan Fraser, who'll play the live-action version of "George of the Jungle" when it opens Wednesday, is the host for AMC's week-long "Best of Tarzan Festival." Tonight he gets the best out of the way first."Tarzan and His Mate" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., repeats 12: 30 a.m.-2: 30 a.m.) wasn't the first on-screen pairing of Johnny Weissmuller and Maureen O'Sullivan -- that distinction goes to 1932's "Tarzan, the Ape Man" -- but it was the best. Just as Jane (O'Sullivan) has set up a home with her Jungle King, who should show up but her former fiance, hoping to lure her back to England and also discover the whereabouts of the famed elephant's graveyard and its vast quantities of precious ivory.
SPORTS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 20, 2007
For those who would rather spend this afternoon in their television rooms than the Preakness infield, here are five movies centered on horse racing that should get you in the mood for the big race. Tacked on to the end are two more films that, though unavailable on DVD or tape and rarely seen, sound worth the hunt. A Day at the Races (directed by Sam Wood, 1937): The Marx Brothers are unleashed at the racetrack, but only so they can raise enough money to save a sanitarium owned by the lovely Maureen O'Sullivan (five years removed from her first stint as Jane to Johnny Weissmuller's Tarzan)
SPORTS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 19, 2007
For those who would rather spend this afternoon in their television rooms than the Preakness infield, here are five movies centered on horse racing that should get you in the mood for the big race. Tacked on to the end are two more films that, though unavailable on DVD or tape and rarely seen, sound worth the hunt. AT THE MOVIES A Day at the Races (directed by Sam Wood, 1937): The Marx Brothers are unleashed at the racetrack, but only so they can raise enough money to save a sanitarium owned by the lovely Maureen O'Sullivan (five years removed from her first stint as Jane to Johnny Weissmuller's Tarzan)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1997
The big blockbuster film of 1996 shows up on cable tonight to blow things up real good."Mad About You" (6: 30 p.m.-7 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Vintage greatness: Paul tries to get the great Alan Brady (Carl Reiner) to narrate a documentary about TV. Thankfully, Brady is still the ego-inflated blowhard he was on "The Dick Van Dyke Show." Whatever you do, don't stop watching until the final credits have rolled."Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Grant Shaud ("Murphy Brown")
SPORTS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 20, 2007
For those who would rather spend this afternoon in their television rooms than the Preakness infield, here are five movies centered on horse racing that should get you in the mood for the big race. Tacked on to the end are two more films that, though unavailable on DVD or tape and rarely seen, sound worth the hunt. A Day at the Races (directed by Sam Wood, 1937): The Marx Brothers are unleashed at the racetrack, but only so they can raise enough money to save a sanitarium owned by the lovely Maureen O'Sullivan (five years removed from her first stint as Jane to Johnny Weissmuller's Tarzan)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 10, 1994
Imagine Agatha Christie with a sense of humor -- hard, I know, but try! -- and you may gain some perception of the delight to be encountered in "Widow's Peak," which opens today at the Rotunda and the Towson Commons.Wickedly plotted, full of joyous malice and nasty behavior, and boasting real bite at the end, "Widow's Peak" is sheer pleasure. It's one of those few movies that might respond to Alice Roosevelt Longworth's dictum, "If you can't say something good about someone, sit right here by me."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Millions of television viewers will join members of the Senate Judiciary Committee today in judging the perceived honesty, or lack of it, of Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas and Anita Hill, the woman who says he sexually harassed her on the job.It will be a straight call on credibility. And, according two of the nation's leading authorities on psychological lie-detection, it will not be an easy judgment -- both could be telling the truth, and so could Angela Wright, a second woman who has been subpoenaed to testify against Judge Thomas.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | July 18, 1994
Everything but the final score made for a spectacular opening night show that drew rave reviews because it offered the perfect blend -- highlighted by the most entertaining and tasteful pre-game program old Baltimore has ever seen. There was the historical international aspect, teams representing two countries, the United States and Canada, that have enjoyed a perpetual friendship. The anthems were beautifully delivered. Dignity prevailed.Then the extraordinary appearance of seeing a team owner and league commissioner on horseback in the middle of Memorial Stadium.
SPORTS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 19, 2007
For those who would rather spend this afternoon in their television rooms than the Preakness infield, here are five movies centered on horse racing that should get you in the mood for the big race. Tacked on to the end are two more films that, though unavailable on DVD or tape and rarely seen, sound worth the hunt. AT THE MOVIES A Day at the Races (directed by Sam Wood, 1937): The Marx Brothers are unleashed at the racetrack, but only so they can raise enough money to save a sanitarium owned by the lovely Maureen O'Sullivan (five years removed from her first stint as Jane to Johnny Weissmuller's Tarzan)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 14, 1997
Brendan Fraser, who'll play the live-action version of "George of the Jungle" when it opens Wednesday, is the host for AMC's week-long "Best of Tarzan Festival." Tonight he gets the best out of the way first."Tarzan and His Mate" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., repeats 12: 30 a.m.-2: 30 a.m.) wasn't the first on-screen pairing of Johnny Weissmuller and Maureen O'Sullivan -- that distinction goes to 1932's "Tarzan, the Ape Man" -- but it was the best. Just as Jane (O'Sullivan) has set up a home with her Jungle King, who should show up but her former fiance, hoping to lure her back to England and also discover the whereabouts of the famed elephant's graveyard and its vast quantities of precious ivory.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1997
The big blockbuster film of 1996 shows up on cable tonight to blow things up real good."Mad About You" (6: 30 p.m.-7 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Vintage greatness: Paul tries to get the great Alan Brady (Carl Reiner) to narrate a documentary about TV. Thankfully, Brady is still the ego-inflated blowhard he was on "The Dick Van Dyke Show." Whatever you do, don't stop watching until the final credits have rolled."Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Grant Shaud ("Murphy Brown")
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | July 18, 1994
Everything but the final score made for a spectacular opening night show that drew rave reviews because it offered the perfect blend -- highlighted by the most entertaining and tasteful pre-game program old Baltimore has ever seen. There was the historical international aspect, teams representing two countries, the United States and Canada, that have enjoyed a perpetual friendship. The anthems were beautifully delivered. Dignity prevailed.Then the extraordinary appearance of seeing a team owner and league commissioner on horseback in the middle of Memorial Stadium.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 10, 1994
Imagine Agatha Christie with a sense of humor -- hard, I know, but try! -- and you may gain some perception of the delight to be encountered in "Widow's Peak," which opens today at the Rotunda and the Towson Commons.Wickedly plotted, full of joyous malice and nasty behavior, and boasting real bite at the end, "Widow's Peak" is sheer pleasure. It's one of those few movies that might respond to Alice Roosevelt Longworth's dictum, "If you can't say something good about someone, sit right here by me."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Millions of television viewers will join members of the Senate Judiciary Committee today in judging the perceived honesty, or lack of it, of Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas and Anita Hill, the woman who says he sexually harassed her on the job.It will be a straight call on credibility. And, according two of the nation's leading authorities on psychological lie-detection, it will not be an easy judgment -- both could be telling the truth, and so could Angela Wright, a second woman who has been subpoenaed to testify against Judge Thomas.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Millions of television viewers will join members of the Senate Judiciary Committee today in judging the perceived honesty, or lack of it, of Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas and Anita Hill, the woman who says he sexually harassed her on the job.It will be a straight call on credibility.According two of the nation's leading authorities on psychological lie-detection, it will not be an easy judgment -- both could be telling the truth, and so could Angela Wright, a second woman who has been subpoenaed to testify against Judge Thomas.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1996
Personally, I'd much rather watch the Orioles than the Miss Universe pageant, but if you absolutely cannot miss this annual fleshfest, check out Washington's WUSA, Channel 9, at 9 p.m. Otherwise, watch dem O's play Seattle on WJZ, Channel 13, at 7: 35 p.m. or select from these other choice viewing morsels."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Millions of television viewers will join members of the Senate Judiciary Committee today in judging the perceived honesty, or lack of it, of Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas and Anita Hill, the woman who says he sexually harassed her on the job.It will be a straight call on credibility.According two of the nation's leading authorities on psychological lie-detection, it will not be an easy judgment -- both could be telling the truth, and so could Angela Wright, a second woman who has been subpoenaed to testify against Judge Thomas.
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