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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1995
If you're a fan of old movies, this may be a good day to call in sick, cash in those eight hours of annual leave or program your VCR to work overtime. That is, as long as your cable system offers Turner Classic Movies. If not, well take a look at what you're missing.* "Sinatra: 80 Years My Way" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- OK, so it's a few days late. Last anyone heard, Mr. Sinatra is still 80, and people are still wanting to wish him well. Performers at this fete, taped last month in Los Angeles, include Tony Bennett, Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan, Natalie Cole and Little Richard.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | January 5, 2007
"Jump Cuts," a series of short films that spotlights the art of film editing, will be shown tomorrow at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St. The program, put together by Pratt sight and sound librarian Tom Warner, includes the famous "Odessa Steps" sequence from Sergei Eisenstein's groundbreaking 1925 Battleship Potemkin, an exercise in cinematic rabble-rousing that's a staple in film schools, along with such short films as Jim Henson's Oscar-nominated...
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By Lou Cedrone | May 28, 1991
The mother in ''Only the Lonely'' is an impossible woman, someone only a son could love. A first-generation bigot, she is a woman who hates everybody who isn't Irish. The fact that we can tolerate her, can appreciate the film that surrounds her, is tribute to the talents of Chris Columbus, who wrote and directed, and John Hughes, who produced.It was Hughes who wrote ''Home Alone,'' which Columbus also directed. ''Home Alone'' may be the funnier movie, but ''Only the Lonely'' is the better film, an all-round film that doesn't resort to the humor of the Three Stooges.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 5, 2003
James Stewart was afflicted with all the earmarks of a has-been actor in 1950 -- his last few films (including It's a Wonderful Life) had been moderate successes at best, his acting style seemed hopelessly outdated to postwar audiences and good parts were seeming fewer and further between -- when he took a chance on a movie whose real star was a rifle. By the end of that year, Stewart was back up among the kings of Hollywood -- he'd crack the box-office top 10 for the first time and stay there for the rest of the decade -- and Westerns had a new star.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 24, 1991
In "Only the Lonely," Chris Columbus and John Hughes have tried to buck the summer tides and make a film that's sweet and intimate, that's concerned with real people and their problems, that's a veritable tapestry of the human condition. Too bad it sucks.Call it "Only the Phony." Lethargic and dull and about as close to authentic experience as Spam is to meat, it appears to be a clunky remake of Paddy Chayefsky's brilliant and biting and real "Marty" of 1955.In "Marty," the hero was a dumpy butcher; in "Only the Lonely" -- which, incidentally, seems to bear no relationship to the smoky, evocative Roy Orbison song from which it takes its title -- the hero is a cop. But where Ernest Borgnine was vulnerable, crotchety, bitter, desperate and truly only the lonely, John Candy is a blob of affability undistinguished by other personality traits.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | January 5, 2007
"Jump Cuts," a series of short films that spotlights the art of film editing, will be shown tomorrow at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St. The program, put together by Pratt sight and sound librarian Tom Warner, includes the famous "Odessa Steps" sequence from Sergei Eisenstein's groundbreaking 1925 Battleship Potemkin, an exercise in cinematic rabble-rousing that's a staple in film schools, along with such short films as Jim Henson's Oscar-nominated...
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 21, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Though she left the movie business 17 years ago, Maureen O'Hara can never really leave Hollywood. Too many of her films are classics and TV staples, including a certain holiday perennial about a gent named Kris Kringle.Reminiscing about "Miracle on 34th Street" (1947), O'Hara says, "We knew we were making a good movie -- the script was so wonderful, and there was such rapport among the cast -- but no one had any idea that the film would be with us, well, forever."Indeed, just weeks ago, as O'Hara walked home from church in New York City, a child asked her: "Aren't you the lady who knows Santa Claus?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 5, 2003
James Stewart was afflicted with all the earmarks of a has-been actor in 1950 -- his last few films (including It's a Wonderful Life) had been moderate successes at best, his acting style seemed hopelessly outdated to postwar audiences and good parts were seeming fewer and further between -- when he took a chance on a movie whose real star was a rifle. By the end of that year, Stewart was back up among the kings of Hollywood -- he'd crack the box-office top 10 for the first time and stay there for the rest of the decade -- and Westerns had a new star.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 18, 1994
Forget "Mary Shelley's Frankenstein." "Miracle on 34th Street" is John Hughes' Frankenstein -- a slow, lumbering beast that walks with the stiff-kneed, bolt-necked shuffle of something built out of corpses and animated by a double-A battery.It is infernally slow. Its two treacly hours feel like years -- nay, decades. When you finally emerge from the theater, you expect to find that the seasons have changed.Derived from a mysteriously beloved and grotesquely overrated 1947 film, it retells the meek fable of the time they put Santa Claus on trial for being nuts.
FEATURES
August 17, 2007
87 Maureen O'Hara Actress 64 Robert De Niro Actor 49 Belinda Carlisle Singer 47 Sean Penn Actor 38 Donnie Wahlberg Actor/singer
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1995
If you're a fan of old movies, this may be a good day to call in sick, cash in those eight hours of annual leave or program your VCR to work overtime. That is, as long as your cable system offers Turner Classic Movies. If not, well take a look at what you're missing.* "Sinatra: 80 Years My Way" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- OK, so it's a few days late. Last anyone heard, Mr. Sinatra is still 80, and people are still wanting to wish him well. Performers at this fete, taped last month in Los Angeles, include Tony Bennett, Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan, Natalie Cole and Little Richard.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 18, 1994
Forget "Mary Shelley's Frankenstein." "Miracle on 34th Street" is John Hughes' Frankenstein -- a slow, lumbering beast that walks with the stiff-kneed, bolt-necked shuffle of something built out of corpses and animated by a double-A battery.It is infernally slow. Its two treacly hours feel like years -- nay, decades. When you finally emerge from the theater, you expect to find that the seasons have changed.Derived from a mysteriously beloved and grotesquely overrated 1947 film, it retells the meek fable of the time they put Santa Claus on trial for being nuts.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 28, 1991
The mother in ''Only the Lonely'' is an impossible woman, someone only a son could love. A first-generation bigot, she is a woman who hates everybody who isn't Irish. The fact that we can tolerate her, can appreciate the film that surrounds her, is tribute to the talents of Chris Columbus, who wrote and directed, and John Hughes, who produced.It was Hughes who wrote ''Home Alone,'' which Columbus also directed. ''Home Alone'' may be the funnier movie, but ''Only the Lonely'' is the better film, an all-round film that doesn't resort to the humor of the Three Stooges.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 24, 1991
In "Only the Lonely," Chris Columbus and John Hughes have tried to buck the summer tides and make a film that's sweet and intimate, that's concerned with real people and their problems, that's a veritable tapestry of the human condition. Too bad it sucks.Call it "Only the Phony." Lethargic and dull and about as close to authentic experience as Spam is to meat, it appears to be a clunky remake of Paddy Chayefsky's brilliant and biting and real "Marty" of 1955.In "Marty," the hero was a dumpy butcher; in "Only the Lonely" -- which, incidentally, seems to bear no relationship to the smoky, evocative Roy Orbison song from which it takes its title -- the hero is a cop. But where Ernest Borgnine was vulnerable, crotchety, bitter, desperate and truly only the lonely, John Candy is a blob of affability undistinguished by other personality traits.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 21, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Though she left the movie business 17 years ago, Maureen O'Hara can never really leave Hollywood. Too many of her films are classics and TV staples, including a certain holiday perennial about a gent named Kris Kringle.Reminiscing about "Miracle on 34th Street" (1947), O'Hara says, "We knew we were making a good movie -- the script was so wonderful, and there was such rapport among the cast -- but no one had any idea that the film would be with us, well, forever."Indeed, just weeks ago, as O'Hara walked home from church in New York City, a child asked her: "Aren't you the lady who knows Santa Claus?
NEWS
March 8, 1995
Herb Meadow, 83, a veteran scriptwriter who created the TV series "Have Gun Will Travel," died in Los Angeles on Wednesday after a heart attack. His movie credits include "Redhead from Wyoming" with Maureen O'Hara and "The Unguarded Moment" with Esther Williams. In addition to "Have Gun Will Travel," he wrote for about 20 other TV series.C. Hart Schaaf, 83, a former United Nations official, died Feb. 24 of congestive heart failure at his home in Silver Spring. He held a number of posts during his 28-year U.N. career, which began in 1949, and headed U.N. development programs in Israel, the Philippines and Sri Lanka.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services Inc | February 18, 1991
THE PUBLISHING house of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich has - perhaps depending on the outcome of the gulf war -- one of the hottest books of the year on its hands. Certainly the timeliest.On March 25, Joe Hyams' "Flight of the Avenger: George Bush at War and In Love" will hit the bookshelves. The war referred to, of course, is not the current Mideast conflict, but World War II. Hyams digs deep to identify the complex man who leads our country -- and the forces that propel him onward. Bush recently told author Hyams: "When it came time for me to send our kids to Panama and later to the Middle East, I thought back on my own experiences and what it was like to be shot at. . . . Those memories were constantly in my mind when we were discussing committing troops and estimating expected combat losses."
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