Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMaureen Mcgovern
IN THE NEWS

Maureen Mcgovern

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
"Since I was a kid, I've lived for holiday songs, secular and nonsecular," Maureen McGovern said this week. "I'm what my mother called a sentimental slob. " The singer will get to slobber, so to speak, as much as she likes during the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's 2010 Holiday Spectacular, which will pack in a lot of secular and nonsecular seasonal favorites. McGovern, best known for the 1973 hit "The Morning After" from "The Poseidon Adventure," will serve as the production's host and vocal soloist.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
Except for the most practiced and fortified Scrooge-y types, anyone with an ounce of delight in the Christmas season and its music will find the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's sixth annual Holiday Spectacular well worth a visit. Quibble, if you like, over the designation "spectacular," but when it comes to spirit and entertainment, the show still delivers. Question, if you like, some of the elements packed into the nearly two-hour production, but somehow, as in past years, it all holds together surprisingly well.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,Staff Writer | January 28, 1994
Though she came to prominence singing movie themes in the late '70s, Maureen McGovern says her real musical education began in the early '80s as a cabaret singer.Drifting from club to club across Manhattan, Ms. McGovern, 44, was freed of commercial pressures to sing things she didn't like. She was allowed to pursue her love for the music of George and Ira Gershwin, Stephen Sondheim and Duke Ellington. And it's only now, with her performance with the Duke Ellington Orchestra this weekend at the Meyerhoff, that she can pay tribute to the last of these influences.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
"Since I was a kid, I've lived for holiday songs, secular and nonsecular," Maureen McGovern said this week. "I'm what my mother called a sentimental slob. " The singer will get to slobber, so to speak, as much as she likes during the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's 2010 Holiday Spectacular, which will pack in a lot of secular and nonsecular seasonal favorites. McGovern, best known for the 1973 hit "The Morning After" from "The Poseidon Adventure," will serve as the production's host and vocal soloist.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 9, 2006
Little Women would certainly never be lumped into the "disaster" genre -- no ocean liners sink; no skyscrapers collapse. But this gentle musical gives the performer once dubbed "The Disaster Theme Queen" a solo every bit as uplifting as The Poseidon Adventure's "The Morning After" or The Towering Inferno's "We May Never Love Like This Again." In Little Women, the musical adapted from Louisa May Alcott's classic novel, McGovern plays Marmee, mother of the four March sisters. After the death of daughter Beth, Marmee sings "Days of Plenty," to encourage daughter Jo. ("So believe that she mattered / And believe that she always will.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | March 10, 1991
Art advocates to lobby Congress for money, freedomArtists and arts leaders from around the country will gather in Washington March 20 for National Cultural Advocacy Day to lobby for increased federal support for the arts and to continue their dialogue about freedom of expression.Participants will hear speeches by members of Congress and their aides in the morning, followed by afternoon meetings between the two groups.A year ago, what organizers described as "the largest cultural contingent in recent history" massed in Washington in support of the embattled National Endowment for the Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | November 25, 1999
Festival of wreathsLooking for a unique door decoration this holiday season? How about a Pokemon wreath, or a "Lion King" wreath with three orchestra seats to the hit Broadway musical, or, if you prefer, a wreath from the Baltimore Orioles that includes a pair of tickets to a 2000 game. Whatever your fancy, starting Tuesday and running through Dec. 4, you can place your silent bid on one of more than 100 uniquely decorated theme wreaths at the Carroll County Arts Council's "Festival of Wreaths."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 6, 2005
An Israeli prime minister, a dying college professor and the matriarch from a classic Louisa May Alcott novel are among characters audiences will see on stage at the Hippodrome Theatre in 2005-2006. The two-play, five-musical season, to be formally announced at the theater today, features three current Broadway shows (including the Billy Joel musical Movin' Out), but it isn't built around a blockbuster. Instead, Marks Chowning, executive director of the Hippodrome, characterized it as "a season full of marquee stars."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
Except for the most practiced and fortified Scrooge-y types, anyone with an ounce of delight in the Christmas season and its music will find the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's sixth annual Holiday Spectacular well worth a visit. Quibble, if you like, over the designation "spectacular," but when it comes to spirit and entertainment, the show still delivers. Question, if you like, some of the elements packed into the nearly two-hour production, but somehow, as in past years, it all holds together surprisingly well.
FEATURES
August 16, 1992
Music lovers from around the country are heading for Bethlehem, Pa., and Musikfest '92, a nine-day multicultural music festival, which opened yesterday and continues through Aug. 23.With more than 600 musical performances, you're bound to find some of your favorites -- everything from Bach to bluegrass. Lou Rawls, Trisha Yearwood, The Kingston Trio, Maureen McGovern, America, Neil Sedaka and The Captain & Tennille are among the headline acts. Dance bands, magicians, jugglers and other street performers set a lively pace on Main Street, and a children's area offers a backyard circus, storytelling, puppets, children's theater and craft projects.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 9, 2006
Little Women would certainly never be lumped into the "disaster" genre -- no ocean liners sink; no skyscrapers collapse. But this gentle musical gives the performer once dubbed "The Disaster Theme Queen" a solo every bit as uplifting as The Poseidon Adventure's "The Morning After" or The Towering Inferno's "We May Never Love Like This Again." In Little Women, the musical adapted from Louisa May Alcott's classic novel, McGovern plays Marmee, mother of the four March sisters. After the death of daughter Beth, Marmee sings "Days of Plenty," to encourage daughter Jo. ("So believe that she mattered / And believe that she always will.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 6, 2005
An Israeli prime minister, a dying college professor and the matriarch from a classic Louisa May Alcott novel are among characters audiences will see on stage at the Hippodrome Theatre in 2005-2006. The two-play, five-musical season, to be formally announced at the theater today, features three current Broadway shows (including the Billy Joel musical Movin' Out), but it isn't built around a blockbuster. Instead, Marks Chowning, executive director of the Hippodrome, characterized it as "a season full of marquee stars."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | November 25, 1999
Festival of wreathsLooking for a unique door decoration this holiday season? How about a Pokemon wreath, or a "Lion King" wreath with three orchestra seats to the hit Broadway musical, or, if you prefer, a wreath from the Baltimore Orioles that includes a pair of tickets to a 2000 game. Whatever your fancy, starting Tuesday and running through Dec. 4, you can place your silent bid on one of more than 100 uniquely decorated theme wreaths at the Carroll County Arts Council's "Festival of Wreaths."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,Staff Writer | January 28, 1994
Though she came to prominence singing movie themes in the late '70s, Maureen McGovern says her real musical education began in the early '80s as a cabaret singer.Drifting from club to club across Manhattan, Ms. McGovern, 44, was freed of commercial pressures to sing things she didn't like. She was allowed to pursue her love for the music of George and Ira Gershwin, Stephen Sondheim and Duke Ellington. And it's only now, with her performance with the Duke Ellington Orchestra this weekend at the Meyerhoff, that she can pay tribute to the last of these influences.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | March 10, 1991
Art advocates to lobby Congress for money, freedomArtists and arts leaders from around the country will gather in Washington March 20 for National Cultural Advocacy Day to lobby for increased federal support for the arts and to continue their dialogue about freedom of expression.Participants will hear speeches by members of Congress and their aides in the morning, followed by afternoon meetings between the two groups.A year ago, what organizers described as "the largest cultural contingent in recent history" massed in Washington in support of the embattled National Endowment for the Arts.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 9, 1997
A night of music on TV features a little bit of everything, and one very odd couple."Beauty and the Beast on Ice" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) features Eketerina Gordeeva and Victor Petrenko in the title roles, aided by cast members from New York and Los Angeles stage productions. It's all very lovely and chock-full of music ("Gaston," "Be Our Guest," etc.)."The Ira Gershwin Centenary Concert: Who Could Ask For Anything More?" (10 p.m.-midnight, repeats 2 a.m.-4 a.m., A&E) celebrates the words that so beautifully complemented the music of Ira's brother, George.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | April 7, 1991
Dance concert will honor retiring deanThe Towson State University Dance Company will perform Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and next Sunday at 3 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center Concert Hall on Osler Drive. The program, dedicated to Gilbert A. Brungardt, who is retiring this summer as dean of Towson's College of Fine Arts and Communications, will feature seven premieres, including works by artistic director Susan Leslie Grubb and managing director Dennis Price.The concert is designed for audiences of all ages.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.