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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
With rapt attention, 4-year-old Alexis Gamble fixed her eyes on three teenage girls, bare-footed in vibrant-colored dresses, as they danced to traditional African beats on Saturday, the fourth day of Kwanzaa. The Gamble family, of Owings Mills, lights a candle each day of the seven-day holiday that was created in 1966 by Eastern Shore native Maulana Karenga to reflect on African culture. They were among more than 350 who turned out for the annual celebration at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
The Eastern Shore-born activist who created Kwanzaa told a standing-room-only crowd the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture on Saturday that the post-Christmas holiday is a celebration of "all that is good in life. " Maulana Karenga, who launched the seven-day observance of African culture and values nearly a half-century ago, received an enthusiastic reception from hundreds who jammed the museum's theater and overloaded its elevators. "We're not afraid of saying we're celebrating black people," said Karenga, chairman of the Africana studies department at California State University in Long Beach.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
The Eastern Shore-born activist who created Kwanzaa told a standing-room-only crowd the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture on Saturday that the post-Christmas holiday is a celebration of "all that is good in life. " Maulana Karenga, who launched the seven-day observance of African culture and values nearly a half-century ago, received an enthusiastic reception from hundreds who jammed the museum's theater and overloaded its elevators. "We're not afraid of saying we're celebrating black people," said Karenga, chairman of the Africana studies department at California State University in Long Beach.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
With rapt attention, 4-year-old Alexis Gamble fixed her eyes on three teenage girls, bare-footed in vibrant-colored dresses, as they danced to traditional African beats on Saturday, the fourth day of Kwanzaa. The Gamble family, of Owings Mills, lights a candle each day of the seven-day holiday that was created in 1966 by Eastern Shore native Maulana Karenga to reflect on African culture. They were among more than 350 who turned out for the annual celebration at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2010
Dressed in a gold and tan dashiki shirt, William E. Lambert stepped out in front of the ritual table and spelled it out in plain terms for the gathering at the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park & Museum in Catonsville: "As they say on the corner, 'We're all in this mess together.' That's what this is all about it. " So began the ceremonies on Day Three of the weeklong festival of Kwanzaa, an observance born of black nationalism of the 1960s that...
NEWS
By Karlayne Parker and Karlayne Parker,Unisun Editor | February 4, 2007
December marked the 40th anniversary of Kwanzaa. Observed from Dec. 26 through Jan. 1, Kwanzaa is an African-American cultural expression marked by a seven-day celebration of certain principles, including unity, self-determination, creative work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity and faith. Maulana Karenga founded Kwanzaa, which is Swahili for "first fruits of the harvest," in 1966. While there were many Kwanzaa events in the area, we stopped at the Baltimore Museum of Art for family activities.
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | December 23, 1991
FORT WORTH, Texas -- Kwanzaa is a relatively young holiday, but about 13 million Americans now are actively observing it, according to Cedric McClester, a spokesman for the New York Urban Coalition, which started a communitywide Kwanzaa celebration in 1979."
FEATURES
December 6, 1999
Kwanzaa (KWON-zah) is one of the world's newest holidays. It's the seven-day African-American celebration, created by Dr. Maulana Karenga, that starts Dec. 26. It's about knowing yourself, finding your purpose and helping others. The first Kwanzaa was celebrated in California in 1966. In Swahili, Kwanzaa means the "first fruits" gathered at harvest time.Here's what you can learn from each day of Kwanzaa.Nguzo Saba (En-Goo-Zoh SAH-bah) is Swahili for the seven principles, or values, by which people should live.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2004
Celebrate the African-American holiday of Kwanzaa on Sunday at the Baltimore Museum of Art. The museum's free Kwanzaa Family Day takes place on the first day of the holiday, which runs each year from Dec. 26 through Jan. 1. Created in 1966 by California State University at Long Beach professor Maulana Karenga, the nonreligious holiday of Kwanzaa celebrates family and community. Patterned after African harvest festivals, the holiday highlights a different principle each day and features a candle-lighting, a feast and often a gift exchange.
FEATURES
By Jerdine Nolen | November 29, 1998
Editor's note: In her bi-weekly column, award-winning children's author Jerdine Nolen today provides suggestions for a seasonal holiday booklist.So many wonderful family traditions are connected to all the many holidays that meet in the months of December and January. You probably have your favorites. Here is an abbreviated list of familiar titles and some you may not know yet for sharing or giving as gifts.Animal* "Time Flies" by Eric Rohmann* The "Frog and Toad" series by Arnold Lobel* The "My Father's Dragon" series by Ruth Stiles Gannett* "Old Turtle" by Douglas Wood* "Gila Monsters Meet You at the Airport" by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat* "Flossie and the Fox" by Patricia McKissack* "Stellaluna" by Jannell Cannon* Books by Dr. Seuss* Books by William Steig Concept Books, Board Books and Pop-Up Books* "Mouse Paint" by Ellen Stoll Walsh* "Charlie the Chicken" by Nick Denchfield* "Blue Hat, Green Hat" by Sandra Boynton* "Dressing" by Helen OxenburyL * "Jesse Bear, What Will You Wear?"
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2010
Dressed in a gold and tan dashiki shirt, William E. Lambert stepped out in front of the ritual table and spelled it out in plain terms for the gathering at the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park & Museum in Catonsville: "As they say on the corner, 'We're all in this mess together.' That's what this is all about it. " So began the ceremonies on Day Three of the weeklong festival of Kwanzaa, an observance born of black nationalism of the 1960s that...
BUSINESS
Patrick Maynard and The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2012
Happy Boxing Day ! If you haven't tipped your coachman, be sure to pull a few shillings from behind your ascot, then send him off to spend the day with his brood. With most people still out of the office, online trends are leaning toward what movie to see while spending an extra day with relatives. Also of interest today are a bidding war in the English Premiere League for Spanish player David Villa and gossip about what celebrities did over Christmas. || ONLINE TRENDS || Boxing Day ( Kwanzaa , Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, Christmas)
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2002
In a classroom at the Baltimore Museum of Art yesterday, strangers sat next to each other making dolls using brown cotton gloves stuffed with polyester fiber filling and boxes of assorted beads, ribbons, yarn and pieces of cloth during a crafts workshop celebrating Kwanzaa. That so many people would sit elbow-to-elbow around small tables for such an exercise perfectly captured the spirit of the African-American event, said museum teacher Marjorie Anderson. "Today is the fourth day of Kwanzaa," which represents cooperative economics, Anderson said.
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