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By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Gilda Weinfeld from Pikesville said that last year during Passover, an acquaintance sent her some homemade chocolate-covered matzo. She said it was absolutely delicious. But when she called her friend to thank her for the gift, she asked for the recipe - and her friend politely declined to give it to her. Not to worry - there are plenty of good recipes for homemade chocolate matzo both online and in print. My go-to recipe for this holiday treat comes from "A Treasury of Jewish Holiday Baking" by Marcy Goldman.
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By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Gilda Weinfeld from Pikesville said that last year during Passover, an acquaintance sent her some homemade chocolate-covered matzo. She said it was absolutely delicious. But when she called her friend to thank her for the gift, she asked for the recipe - and her friend politely declined to give it to her. Not to worry - there are plenty of good recipes for homemade chocolate matzo both online and in print. My go-to recipe for this holiday treat comes from "A Treasury of Jewish Holiday Baking" by Marcy Goldman.
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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1994
Yehuda Fishkind's new matzo bakery is run more like a little synagogue than a business where dough is rolled and baked for the traditional Jewish Passover flat bread.Instead of using machines to mix and knead the dough, Mr. Fishkind's employees stand side by side like worshipers, carefully hand-rolling each matzo under the strict rules of Jewish law.They say a simple prayer as they roll each batch of matzos. And a rabbi inspects every matzo as it comes out of the wood-burning oven.It has been almost 40 years since matzos were baked in Baltimore, according to the Jewish Historical Society of Maryland.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | June 18, 2008
Every Friday for years, Linda Burstyn had been serving the same Shabbat meal of challah bread, matzo ball soup, chicken, a vegetable, a starch and, if there was company, gefilte fish and dessert. Her family liked the meal, and the Jewish tradition. Burstyn generally thought it wasn't so bad for them. But she also knew it was a big meal and maybe there was room to make it a little different and a little more healthful. The Pikesville mom wasn't sure exactly what to change, however, without sacrificing the integrity of the dinner or upsetting her husband, kids and the relatives and friends who liked what they had been getting at her table.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | March 28, 2007
Ever since the Jews fled ancient Egypt with their unleavened bread, matzo has traveled with them to all corners of the Jewish Diaspora. And just as Jewish life has found fresh expression on new soil and with new generations, so has matzo. As Jews prepare for Passover, the seven-day festival that celebrates the Exodus and begins at sundown Monday, their options for matzo, a staple of the ritual meal made of milled grain and water, are nearly as bountiful as the meal itself.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 19, 2000
IN PREPARATION for Passover, one of the buildings at the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education has been turned into a Model Matzah Bakery. Rabbi Hillel Baron estimates that up to 1,500 people came to the center during the past two weeks to make the unleavened bread that is a staple of the Jewish holiday. Matzo is served during Seder, the traditional Passover meal eaten during the retelling of Jewish slaves' exodus from Egypt. Foods such as bitter herbs, roasted eggs and a dish made from apples, raisins, nuts and wine are sampled at various points during the telling of the story.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1996
The unleavened round bread raised eyebrows and taste buds."I don't know what it tastes like," said 5-year-old Frances Loucks, "but it's yummy."The preschooler at Chizuk Amuna Early Childhood Educational Center in Pikesville was among 60 children last week who visited Howard County's only matzo factory, at the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education in West Columbia, to learn about matzo and Passover.The eight-day Jewish holiday, which begins tonight,commemorates the story of ancient Jews' flight from bondage in Egypt.
FEATURES
By Jeannette Belliveau and By Jeannette Belliveau,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 2000
Any style of cooking bound by strict rules found in the Old Testament, and molded by a people who often struggled to obtain food and spices in Poland and Russia, is likely to be highly traditional and at times austere. Yet, as that cuisine enters its fourth millennium, the winds of change are blowing strongly over Jewish cooking. And what better time to experiment with new food preparations than at Passover, the eight-day Jewish holiday that starts at sundown next Wednesday? Actually, immigrants have been adapting Jewish food to New World tastes and products ever since 1654, when the first Jewish settlers, from the Iberian Peninsula, arrived in Colonial America.
NEWS
By Fay Lande | April 16, 2003
Jerad Bates stood ready between two canvas booths - one for flour, one for water. He held a bowl in which to mix the two. In the traditional matzo bakery re-created Sunday at the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education's open house, the flour and water for Passover matzo were kept secure in their separate booths before they were mixed, and baked, in 18 minutes. Eighteen is the mystical number for life, but matzo, called the "bread of affliction," has other meanings. The Jewish people baked matzo because there was no time to let bread rise before their exodus from Egypt, said Rabbi Hillel Baron of the Lubavitch Center.
FEATURES
March 29, 1999
"I thought it was stupid;I felt it was dumbto get so excitedabout one or two crumbs."That's not quite Dr. Seuss -- it's Uncle Eli. On his Web site and in Dr. Seussian style, Uncle Eli tells the story of a boy who doesn't understand the meaning of the Jewish holiday of Passover.If you know the story of Moses from the Bible, you know a lot about Passover, the eight-day holiday that starts at sundown March 31. It's both a religious holiday and a historical event. About 3,000 years ago, the Jewish people were slaves in Egypt, but they were led to freedom by Moses.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | March 28, 2007
Ever since the Jews fled ancient Egypt with their unleavened bread, matzo has traveled with them to all corners of the Jewish Diaspora. And just as Jewish life has found fresh expression on new soil and with new generations, so has matzo. As Jews prepare for Passover, the seven-day festival that celebrates the Exodus and begins at sundown Monday, their options for matzo, a staple of the ritual meal made of milled grain and water, are nearly as bountiful as the meal itself.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | April 9, 2006
If green grass and beautiful bonnets are sure signs of spring, then the season was in full swing inside the Gaines McHale antiques store. Some 200 members and supporters of the Junior League of Baltimore had gathered for the organization's "Mad Hatter's Gala," which kicked off its "Celebrate Style! 2006" weekend. Lots of ladies -- including party co-chairs Christi Batch and Lisa Roebuck -- chose lovely straw hats to top off their springy party outfits. And then there were those who took off on the "mad" part of the hat theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 2, 2004
Snyder's Cafe and Deli has been serving Jewish comfort food from its location in the massive Valley Center strip mall for nine years now. The lengthy menu features such Jewish favorites as noodle kugel, brisket, knishes and bagels. But Snyder's, owned by brothers Howard and Brian Snyder, is not a kosher restaurant. It serves shellfish, forbidden in kosher diets, in many forms, including Maryland crab soup and fried shrimp. The shrimp salad sandwich, in particular, is divine, made from large shrimp that are chopped into bite-sized chunks, bound with mayonnaise and seasoned with Old Bay. It comes on a Kaiser roll with lettuce and slices of tomato.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 2004
With the approach of Passover, which begins at sundown on Monday, the lights burn late at Glasz Gourmet's prep kitchen in Hampden. Nona Nielson-Parker, co-owner and chef for the catering business and cafe at Lake Falls Village, is hoping to surpass last year's sales record for matzo brittle, which may be the most addictive holiday treat in all of Baltimore. Matzo brittle is Nielson-Parker's creation, perfected through trial and error. The shop has been selling the brittle since the mid-'90s, and demand has grown each year.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | March 28, 2004
Passover is just over a week away, and you'd love to find something new to add to the table. Well, look no farther than area shops, museum stores and galleries for an array of unique and functional items. At Jacob's Ladder, you'll find everything from matzo plates and wash cups to books about enriching the Passover experience to Haggadas for Reform, Conservative and Orthodox Seders. The shop offers Seder plates ($65 and up), including ceramic plates by Caspi, fused-glass ones by Doris and artsy plates by Kelemen Kuatro.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2004
Seven Mile Market, the largest kosher supermarket in the Baltimore area, will reopen as early as Thursday after a fire last week and in time to meet the Orthodox community's Passover needs, according to Hershel Boehm, the store's co-owner. "We will be fully stocked for Passover," said Boehm, adding that 90 percent of the store's Passover items were in a warehouse a mile away and spared from the fire. Boehm said he was forced to throw out about $400,000 in food -- including deli meats, gefilte fish, borscht, candy and matzo -- after oil in a deep fryer caught fire March 8. County health officials insisted that the food, most of which was insured, be dumped because of smoke damage.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | April 4, 2001
Making matzo The start of Passover on Saturday means lots of matzo. The Columbia Jewish Congregation is selling the classic cookbook "Matza 101" by Jenny Kdoshim and Debbie Blevans. It features more than 100 matzo recipes. To get a copy, send a check or money order for $18.95 to the Columbia Jewish Congregation, 5885 Robert Oliver Place, Columbia, MD 21045. Kitchen of the past Ever fantasize about cooking over an open hearth? The Riversdale House Museum in Prince George's County could make your fantasy come true.
FEATURES
By Joan Nathan and Joan Nathan,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 9, 1997
For Jews throughout the world, Passover, which begins at sundown April 21, marks the commemoration of the exodus from Egypt. For Edda Servi Machlin, author of the two-volume "Classic Cuisine of the Italian Jews" (Giro Press), it is also a time to remember the Seder of 1944, when she and her siblings were in hiding from the Nazis in Italy.More than anyone else, Machlin, a historian of Italian-Jewish life, has brought to the American public the food and stories of the Tuscan town of Pitigliano and its surroundings.
NEWS
September 22, 2003
Bernard Manischewitz, 89, whose kosher foods company was renowned for products including matzo and sweet wine, died of heart disease Saturday in Verona, N.J. Mr. Manischewitz represented the last generation of his family to run B. Manischewitz, the company founded by his grandfather in 1888 in Cincinnati. Rabbi Dov Behr Manischewitz made the unleavened bread Jews eat at Passover based on a 5,000-year-old recipe. The business grew, expanding to a second plant in Jersey City in 1932 that became the company's base.
NEWS
By Fay Lande | April 16, 2003
Jerad Bates stood ready between two canvas booths - one for flour, one for water. He held a bowl in which to mix the two. In the traditional matzo bakery re-created Sunday at the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education's open house, the flour and water for Passover matzo were kept secure in their separate booths before they were mixed, and baked, in 18 minutes. Eighteen is the mystical number for life, but matzo, called the "bread of affliction," has other meanings. The Jewish people baked matzo because there was no time to let bread rise before their exodus from Egypt, said Rabbi Hillel Baron of the Lubavitch Center.
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