Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMatthew Shepard
IN THE NEWS

Matthew Shepard

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By David Kelly and David Kelly,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2003
CASPER, Wyo. - The Rev. Fred Phelps plans to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Matthew Shepard's murder in his own unique style. The 73-year-old Topeka, Kan., pastor has designed a granite monument engraved with Shepard's face followed by these words chiseled in the stone: Matthew Shepard Entered Hell October 12, 1998, at Age 21 In Defiance of God's Warning: "Thou shalt not lie with mankind as with womankind; it is abomination." Leviticus 18:22. Shepard, a freshman at the University of Wyoming, Laramie, was tied to a fence and beaten into a coma, allegedly because he was a homosexual.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 21, 2014
I never thought I could feel such gratitude toward a posse of motorcycle riders as I did the day Brendan Looney was buried beside his best friend, Travis Manion, in Arlington National Cemetery. They screened the grieving families of the two Naval Academy graduates from the hateful placards carried by the members of the Westboro Baptist Church who celebrated the deaths of those young men as evidence of God's retribution on our sinful nation. And riders revved their engines so the families could not hear the chants.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 17, 1998
THERE ARE bowed heads and sympathy over the death of Matthew Shepard, most of it genuine, some of it hypocritical.The University of Wyoming student, who was gay, died Monday after a horrible beating. His skull was smashed, he suffered cuts about his head and face, he had been burned. He was found tied to a fence in temperatures in the low 30s.Police have charged two young men, one who says Mr. Shepard flirted with him in a bar, and their girlfriends in connection with the crime; the two young women are accused of being accessories.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
Days after a jury acquitted George Zimmerman of second-degree murder and manslaughter in the shooting of Florida teen Trayvon Martin, a coalition of LGBT rights groups has issued an open letter declaring "solidarity" with Martin's family and friends. Led by the National Black Justice Coalition and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, 35 national LGBT advocacy groups signed on for a letter saying they plan to "honor Trayvon Martin by strengthening our commitment to end bias, hatred, profiling and violence across our communities.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 9, 2002
There are two major television movies related to the 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard airing in the next week. HBO has The Laramie Project tonight, while NBC offers The Matthew Shepard Story next Saturday. Of the two, tonight's Laramie Project is the one you don't want to miss - though it is not really about Shepard, the 21-year-old college student who was brutally murdered by two young men who hated him because he was gay. As the title suggests, HBO's film is about Laramie, Wyo., specifically its culture and community following an attack that shocked the nation.
NEWS
October 16, 1998
An excerpt of a Chicago Tribune editorial that was published yesterdayAn excerpt of a Chicago Tribune editorial that was published yesterday: MATTHEW Shepard, a 105-pound, 5-foot 2-inch, soft-spoken wisp of a kid, couldn't have been much of a threat to anyone. Yet he had been assaulted twice in recent months and last week he was pistol-whipped, strung up spread-eagle against a fence on the outskirts of Laramie, Wyo. He died five days later.It's an inconceivable crime that yet cries out for an explanation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,Special to the Sun | September 24, 2000
Dumb, ignorant, drop-out losers killed the young gay man Matthew Shepard in Wyoming in 1998. Americans were genuinely horrified, but urban gay Americans, in particular, took the murder as a sign that they had made the right decision when they moved from the country (or, more likely, the suburbs) to the big city. They were safer in Manhattan, or Dupont Circle, or West Hollywood, or South Beach. But gay people put too much stock in smartness, sophistication and "culture" as signs of tolerance and acceptance.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 1998
Before savagely beating Matthew Shepard with a pistol butt, TC one of his tormentors taunted him, saying, "It's Gay Awareness Week," a police investigator has testified at a hearing in Laramie, Wyo., for one of two men accused of the murder of the gay college student.The testimony, by Sgt. Rob Debree, came at a daylong proceeding Thursday. In the evening, Robert Denhardt, a visiting county judge, ordered Aaron McKinney, 22, to stand trial on charges of first-degree murder, robbery and kidnapping.
NEWS
By Steve Sanders | October 18, 1998
MAYBE TRENT Lott didn't mean it.When the Senate majority leader went on a conservative radio show last summer and compared gay people to alcoholics and kleptomaniacs, gay and lesbian leaders took it not so much as a personal insult but as a sop to the Republican Party's restive right-wing base.As if on cue, full-page ads appeared in major newspapers, touting the ability of "ex-gay ministries" to convert gays to heterosexuality. And the religious right's top echelon, led by Gary Bauer, director of the Family Research Council, fanned out on the TV circuit, calmly explaining how homosexuality is immoral, a danger to children and a threat to the nation's values.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 10, 2001
MTV is not known for its original movies, but it has an important one premiering tonight, "Anatomy of a Hate Crime," a dramatization of the 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyo. The film, which tells the story of a gay college student beaten, strung up on a fence and left to die, is a powerful statement about homophobia. But MTV will seek to heighten the film's impact by following it with a 30-minute news special on hate crimes and then shutting down its regular programming altogether to run a scroll listing the names of hundreds of victims of hate crimes.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | December 7, 2011
When "The Laramie Project" was first staged in 2000, it was a joltingly topical theatrical treatment of a notorious recent hate crime. Sad to say, Moises Kaufman's play remains topical, as we're reminded by the confident student revival at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. This docu-drama has its basis in the 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard, a 21-year-old gay student at the University of Wyoming. Responding to this brutal crime with journalistic speed, the playwright and members of the Tectonic Theatre Project interviewed an assortment of people.
NEWS
October 29, 2009
It's been more than a decade since the murder of Matthew Shepard, a gay college student who was kidnapped, pistol-whipped and left to die tied to a fence in freezing weather on a Wyoming ranch in 1998. In the years since, Congress has made several attempts to expand federal hate crimes laws to include violence based on sexual and gender orientation. But until yesterday all of them had failed. That's why President Barack Obama's signing the Matthew Shepard Hate Crimes Prevention Act on Wednesday marked a victory for advocates of greater federal protection for victims of hate crimes motivated by bigotry against gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transgendered people.
NEWS
By David Kelly and David Kelly,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2003
CASPER, Wyo. - The Rev. Fred Phelps plans to commemorate the fifth anniversary of Matthew Shepard's murder in his own unique style. The 73-year-old Topeka, Kan., pastor has designed a granite monument engraved with Shepard's face followed by these words chiseled in the stone: Matthew Shepard Entered Hell October 12, 1998, at Age 21 In Defiance of God's Warning: "Thou shalt not lie with mankind as with womankind; it is abomination." Leviticus 18:22. Shepard, a freshman at the University of Wyoming, Laramie, was tied to a fence and beaten into a coma, allegedly because he was a homosexual.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | August 24, 2002
Oscar Wilde once wrote: "The truth is rarely pure and never simple." The same could be said of The Laramie Project, the play that is sparking the latest salvo in the culture wars. Conservative Christian leaders have said they might file a lawsuit against the University of Maryland in an attempt to block the distribution of 10,000 copies of the play to all freshmen and to other students living on the College Park campus. This fall, students will stage a production of the play, and Moises Kaufman, the work's primary author, is scheduled to visit the campus.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 16, 2002
I would probably like NBC's The Matthew Shepard Story a lot more if HBO's The Laramie Project hadn't run just last week. There's nothing terribly wrong with NBC's telling of this story about a college student beaten to death by two young men who hated him because he was gay. It's a quality production with outstanding direction by Roger Spottiswoode (And the Band Played On ... ), and lead performances from Stockard Channing and Sam Waterston that are every bit as compelling as could be expected from their weekly work in, respectively, The West Wing and Law & Order.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 9, 2002
There are two major television movies related to the 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard airing in the next week. HBO has The Laramie Project tonight, while NBC offers The Matthew Shepard Story next Saturday. Of the two, tonight's Laramie Project is the one you don't want to miss - though it is not really about Shepard, the 21-year-old college student who was brutally murdered by two young men who hated him because he was gay. As the title suggests, HBO's film is about Laramie, Wyo., specifically its culture and community following an attack that shocked the nation.
NEWS
February 25, 1999
THE CASE against John William King was open and shut. The victim's blood was found on his sandals. A motive was as clear as the racist tattoos that adorn almost every inch of his torso.The jury deliberated a little more than two hours Tuesday before finding King guilty in the June 7 murder of James Byrd Jr. The Jasper, Texas man was killed because he was in the wrong place at the wrong time. But mostly, as a black man, he was killed because he was the wrong color.Three white men who said they were giving Mr. Byrd a ride home beat him, chained him to their truck, and dragged him until his head was ripped off. It was one of this nation's most heinous racial crimes since lynchings went out of style.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 21, 2014
I never thought I could feel such gratitude toward a posse of motorcycle riders as I did the day Brendan Looney was buried beside his best friend, Travis Manion, in Arlington National Cemetery. They screened the grieving families of the two Naval Academy graduates from the hateful placards carried by the members of the Westboro Baptist Church who celebrated the deaths of those young men as evidence of God's retribution on our sinful nation. And riders revved their engines so the families could not hear the chants.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 10, 2001
MTV is not known for its original movies, but it has an important one premiering tonight, "Anatomy of a Hate Crime," a dramatization of the 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyo. The film, which tells the story of a gay college student beaten, strung up on a fence and left to die, is a powerful statement about homophobia. But MTV will seek to heighten the film's impact by following it with a 30-minute news special on hate crimes and then shutting down its regular programming altogether to run a scroll listing the names of hundreds of victims of hate crimes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,Special to the Sun | September 24, 2000
Dumb, ignorant, drop-out losers killed the young gay man Matthew Shepard in Wyoming in 1998. Americans were genuinely horrified, but urban gay Americans, in particular, took the murder as a sign that they had made the right decision when they moved from the country (or, more likely, the suburbs) to the big city. They were safer in Manhattan, or Dupont Circle, or West Hollywood, or South Beach. But gay people put too much stock in smartness, sophistication and "culture" as signs of tolerance and acceptance.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.