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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2011
Five artists, including two photographers, a sculptor, a film director and one who works in multimedia, will be competing for this year's $25,000 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape prize. The five include Baltimoreans Stephanie Barber (multimedia), Matthew Porterfield (film) and Rachel Rotenberg (sculpture), along with two Washington photographers, Louie Palu and Mark Parascandola. Works from the five finalists will go on exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art 's Alvin and Fanny Blaustein Thalheimer Galleries beginning June 25. The winner will be announced July 9 at the BMA. This is the sixth year for the award, which is presented annually to a visual artist living and working in the Greater Baltimore area.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
A half-dozen artists, ranging from a sculptor specializing in what he calls "tombstones for a cemetery that has turned carnival" to a photographer focusing on abandoned spaces and objects, have been announced as finalists for this year's $30,000 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize. Finalists for the seventh annual prize, awarded to an artist living and working in the Greater Baltimore area, are: Lisa Dillin , a Silver Spring native raised in the Annapolis area whose interdisciplinary work stems from her interest in what organizers termed "the psychology of the contemporary individual contrasted with that of the primitive one. " She is on the adjunct faculty of the Corcoran College of Art + Design and American University inWashington, D.C. Jonathan Duff , who will be receiving his master's degree in fine arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art 's Mount Royal School of Art in May, is a 2008 graduate of the Twin Cities campus of the University of Minnesota whose sculptures and paintings have been exhibited throughout the Minneapolis area.
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Baltimore Sun staff | July 9, 2011
Matthew Porterfield, the filmmaker behind "Putty Hill" and "Hamilton," was named the winner of the sixth annual Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize on Saturday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts announced the winner of the $25,000 fellowship given every year in conjunction with Artscape at the Baltimore Museum of Art , where his installation is on display. "I'm speechless. To be a finalist among such fine artists is such an honor," Porterfield said Saturday night.
NEWS
July 15, 2011
Today, it's hard to imagine Baltimore without Artscape, the city's annual outdoor festival of the arts that begins Friday. In the three decades since its founding, the great gathering in the heart of midtown's arts district has become part of the warp and woof of this city's cultural fabric, attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors each year with a multicultural mix of big-name musical acts, cutting-edge artworks and spicy foods. It's been billed as the one time each year when people from every part of the city converge to enjoy themselves and each others' company, and it's altogether fitting that music and art are what make such a celebration possible.
NEWS
July 15, 2011
Today, it's hard to imagine Baltimore without Artscape, the city's annual outdoor festival of the arts that begins Friday. In the three decades since its founding, the great gathering in the heart of midtown's arts district has become part of the warp and woof of this city's cultural fabric, attracting hundreds of thousands of visitors each year with a multicultural mix of big-name musical acts, cutting-edge artworks and spicy foods. It's been billed as the one time each year when people from every part of the city converge to enjoy themselves and each others' company, and it's altogether fitting that music and art are what make such a celebration possible.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
The morning after an independent filmmaker heard he's been given a $25,000 arts award, he tried to assess what the check would mean. Matthew Porterfield, who walked away with the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize on Saturday, worked seven years as a waiter at the Chameleon Cafe in Northeast Baltimore to support himself as an artist who made films the way he wanted. In his top-earning year, he once made $30,000 as a kindergarten teacher. Many years he made less than $12,000, despite high critical praise for his cinematic treatments involving the lives of people living in the Northeast Baltimore, where he was born and still resides.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
Growing up in Baltimore's Hamilton neighborhood, Matthew Porterfield never thought he was living in paradise. But it was close enough, just the sort of place from which a budding filmmaker could draw inspiration. "There's just so many different kinds of homes, all sorts of styles," Porterfield, 28, says of the northeast Baltimore neighborhood that would serve as both the setting and the title of his first film, which will be screened Saturday and Sunday evenings at this week's ninth annual Maryland Film Festival.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 6, 2006
Quiet and contemplative, Hamilton does something very brave: It allows audience members to draw their own conclusions. A slice-of-life drama that follows a young unmarried man and woman as they drift through a hot summer day in Northeast Baltimore, Hamilton, opening today for a weeklong run at The Rotunda, has the courage to tell its audience -- very little. The result is like looking through a window at a couple of people who don't know you're there ... and what's more, don't care. Hamilton Starring Stephanie Vizzi, Chris Myers.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
The morning after an independent filmmaker heard he's been given a $25,000 arts award, he tried to assess what the check would mean. Matthew Porterfield, who walked away with the Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize on Saturday, worked seven years as a waiter at the Chameleon Cafe in Northeast Baltimore to support himself as an artist who made films the way he wanted. In his top-earning year, he once made $30,000 as a kindergarten teacher. Many years he made less than $12,000, despite high critical praise for his cinematic treatments involving the lives of people living in the Northeast Baltimore, where he was born and still resides.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun staff | July 9, 2011
Matthew Porterfield, the filmmaker behind "Putty Hill" and "Hamilton," was named the winner of the sixth annual Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize on Saturday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts announced the winner of the $25,000 fellowship given every year in conjunction with Artscape at the Baltimore Museum of Art , where his installation is on display. "I'm speechless. To be a finalist among such fine artists is such an honor," Porterfield said Saturday night.
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