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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 10, 2006
New York-- --No, Matthew McConaughey assures everyone, he didn't campaign for the title of People magazine's 2005 Sexiest Man Alive. While that may be true, he sure seems comfortable enough with the honor, flashing his relaxed, seen-it-all-before grin at a roomful of reporters. One gets the feeling that McConaughey, 36, does not ruffle easily, that he's supremely comfortable in his own skin. If it's an act, it's a good one, earning the Texas native a busy big-screen career, legions of fans - men who admire his attitude, women who admire his pecs - and the welcome opportunity to play onscreen pretty much the same person he is in real life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
I love "Breaking Bad," and even I didn't think it would win as big as it did Monday night at the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards. Best drama, best actor (Bryan Cranston), best supporting actor (Aaron Paul), best supporting actress (Anna Gunn) and best writing (Moira Walley-Beckett). Did show runner Vince Gilligan & Co. ever go out on a high. And it is all the more impressive when you consider the incredible level of competition for each of those awards. I picked it as best drama, and I picked Gunn and Paul as best supporting actress and actor.
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FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 10, 2006
Matthew McConaughey is handsome and easygoing. Sarah Jessica Parker is adorable and hard-to-resist. Failure to Launch, a romantic comedy that, in spite of its title, has nothing to do with rockets, uses those personas to full advantage. There's comfort in seeing actors we know doing what we've come to expect them to do. But more important, the film surrounds them with supporting characters who are less familiar to us, who act in ways we don't expect. The result is a satisfying blend that goes down nice and easy.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 6, 2014
Just for good measure - to make sure we understand how a homicide detective could become a tortured and isolated human being - viewers of the hottest current drama on HBO were presented with a dead baby in a microwave oven. Actually, the perspective was from inside the oven, from just above the bluish, charred remains of the infant. That way, we were able to see Detective Marty Hart's reaction when he opened the door to have a look. As you might imagine - if "True Detective" can be said to leave anything to the imagination - Woody Harrelson's Hart was pretty upset, so much so that he decided to quit the Louisiana State Police.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 10, 2005
Celebrity watcher alert: Irrepressible fashion plate Sarah Jessica Parker will be sporting her Manolo Blahnik footwear in Annapolis this week. Parker, late of HBO's Sex and the City series, will be filming a scene for her next movie, Failure to Launch, on State Circle either tomorrow or Friday, says the film's publicist, Carol McConnaughey. In the scene, Parker will walk from Paws Pet Boutique toward Harry Brown's restaurant when she stops to speak with a friend. Filming will take most of the day, and the decision to shoot tomorrow or Friday depends on the weather, McConnaughey says.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | February 8, 2008
Thankfully, Fool's Gold doesn't live down to its name. Engaging though flimsy, lively though occasionally tone-deaf, it's a movie that thrives on the strength of its affable co-stars and a sense of adventure that provides just enough brio to get audiences through some energy-sapping rough spots. Matthew McConaughey and Kate Hudson - whose last movie together, 2003's How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, brought in more than $100 million at the domestic box office - once again get to play mismatched partners.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
Ghosts of Girlfriends Past displays nary a wisp of life, let alone an afterlife. It's misbegotten from the get-go: It boasts the nadir of "high concepts." This play on Dickens' A Christmas Carol stars Matthew McConaughey as an amorous Scrooge who dispenses erotic favors like a sexual Pez machine while withholding true love. The movie takes place on the eve of the wedding of the anti-hero's brother (Breckin Meyer) to a hysterical though adoring mate (Lacey Chabert). That's when three spirits guide our good-bad guy through the worlds of girlfriends past, present and future.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 21, 2000
"U-571" is the kind of war picture that William Holden used to star in -- the kind where he rallies his co-stars (let's say Frederic March, Mickey Rooney, Alec Guinness and Don Taylor) to outsmart the enemy, manages a few sardonic cracks and never gets his hair mussed. Matthew McConaughey is no William Holden, but "U-571" still makes good use of his limited range in a World War II submarine thriller that is executed with efficiency and skill. McConaughey plays Andy Tyler, a Navy lieutenant who has just been turned down for a command of his own submarine when he is called upon by his lieutenant commander, Mike Dahlgren (Bill Paxton)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 26, 2002
Fate is a cruel mistress. But maybe not as cruel as we've been led to believe. That may not be a real popular concept in this age of self-centered fatalism and bumper stickers that explain, "Stuff Happens." But it's the idea behind Thirteen Conversations About One Thing, writer-director Jill Sprecher's circular drama in which a cross-section of world-weary New Yorkers avoid optimism at all costs, only to discover it can't be dismissed so easily. This fleetingly autobiographical film -- the character played by Clea DuVall has things happen to her, including some serious injuries and a chance encounter with a smiling man, that Sprecher lifted from her own life story -- threatens to be too ponderously self-conscious and jaded.
FEATURES
By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 26, 1999
There's no avoiding the deja vu that comes while watching "EDtv," a comedy about a man whose life is being broadcast on television 24 hours a day.But despite its surface similarities to "The Truman Show," "EDtv" is actually a radically different movie: Truman was not aware that his every move was being watched by a rapt worldwide audience, but the star of "EDtv" is a willing guinea pig."EDtv" is a shaggy, low-brow cousin to "The Truman Show," less concerned with satirizing the tube than with doodling on our celebrity-obsessed pop culture, in which just "appearing" on TV is enough to make you famous -- even if you have accomplished little of merit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Some final tidbits from backstage at the Oscars 2014: -- Spike Jonze, clutching his Original Screenplay Oscar for “Her,” said he wasn't necessarily foretelling the future with his film about a lonely man who falls in love and carries on a relationship with his computer operating system. “I have no idea,” he said. “I think anything is going to happen and everything's going to happen.” Was he trying to issue some sort of warning about where rampant technology could lead?
EXPLORE
July 29, 2012
now playing "The Amazing Spider-Man" (PG-13). A radioactive spider bite gives Peter Parker super powers, and he also embarks on a quest to learn the truth about his parents. With Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone, Rhys Ifans, Sally Field and Martin Sheen. TownMall Cinemas (12:15, 3:40, 6:40, 9:45 p.m.) "Brave" (PG). A Scottish princess longs for a different life, and must undo a curse to discover happiness. With Kelly Macdonald, Emma Thompson, Billy Connolly. TownMall Cinemas (12:30, 3:50, 6:50 p.m.)
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 1, 2009
Ghosts of Girlfriends Past displays nary a wisp of life, let alone an afterlife. It's misbegotten from the get-go: It boasts the nadir of "high concepts." This play on Dickens' A Christmas Carol stars Matthew McConaughey as an amorous Scrooge who dispenses erotic favors like a sexual Pez machine while withholding true love. The movie takes place on the eve of the wedding of the anti-hero's brother (Breckin Meyer) to a hysterical though adoring mate (Lacey Chabert). That's when three spirits guide our good-bad guy through the worlds of girlfriends past, present and future.
NEWS
By FROM SUN STAFF AND NEWS SERVICES | September 30, 2008
On the Web * For $3.99 a month, PumpPredictor.com provides text information to consumers, via cell phone or e-mail, about when to fill up, when to not pay more than a certain price and when to purchase as little gas as possible, based on ZIP code. Sample alert to The Baltimore Sun's ZIP code Thursday: "Gas is going down. Buy only a quarter tank if needed. Pay no more than $3.49 in BALTIMORE, MD." The site says it brings to consumers the techniques of market timing and inventory management that large commercial fuel buyers like gasoline distributors use. The site says it relies on the same statistics, mathematical modeling and market volatility variables used by pricing managers at oil companies to calculate price changes that trickle down to stations.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | February 8, 2008
Thankfully, Fool's Gold doesn't live down to its name. Engaging though flimsy, lively though occasionally tone-deaf, it's a movie that thrives on the strength of its affable co-stars and a sense of adventure that provides just enough brio to get audiences through some energy-sapping rough spots. Matthew McConaughey and Kate Hudson - whose last movie together, 2003's How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, brought in more than $100 million at the domestic box office - once again get to play mismatched partners.
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,Los Angeles Times | January 2, 2007
HOLLYWOOD -- Matthew Fox is doing double duty these days. He's one of the stars of the Emmy- and Golden Globe Award-winning ABC series Lost, which returns to the network's lineup on Feb. 7, and he's branching out in the feature film world. Fox's first major movie, We Are Marshall, is currently in theaters. But that success comes with a price: The boyish-looking 40-year-old says he wrestles constantly with the need to balance acting and his family life. "The kind of success I am having right now is very time-consuming," Fox said recently, relaxing in the lobby at the Chateau Marmont hotel.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 8, 2005
Sahara doesn't waste time on introductions. It wastes time in other ways. The first hour offers a frenzy of explosions, showdowns and exotic pow-wows as director Breck Eisner strains to set up the essentials of the first (and maybe last) big-screen adventure starring Matthew McConaughey as Clive Cussler's Dirk Pitt. (Cussler wrote the original 700-page-plus novel.) Pitt and his friend from childhood, Al Giordano (Steve Zahn), former Navy SEALs, now belong to the National Underwater Marine Agency (NUMA)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 12, 2002
Frailty, thy name is ... Frailty. The directorial debut of Bill Paxton, who doubles as co-star in the role of a wholesome, God-fearing ax-murderer, is a blood thriller with a broken back. Written by Brent Hanley, this piece of petit-Grande Guignol wants to be American Gothic poetry comparable to Charles Laughton's Night of the Hunter. But it lacks the visual and verbal richness of that eccentric masterpiece or the clean satiric edge of that great cult thriller The Stepfather. Frailty unfolds from the point of view of Paxton's grown son (Matthew McConaughey)
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 6, 2006
The Complete Sherlock Holmes Collection [MPI Home Video] $130 MPI Home Video's delectable The Complete Sherlock Holmes Collection ($130) includes all 14 features that starred Basil Rathbone as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's remarkable sleuth and Nigel Bruce as his partner-in-crime-solving Dr. John H. Watson. The tall, hawklike Rathbone was one of cinema's busiest character actors -- appearing in such films as Romeo and Juliet, Anna Karenina, The Adventures of Robin Hood and If I Were King (for which he received an Oscar nomination)
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 10, 2006
New York-- --No, Matthew McConaughey assures everyone, he didn't campaign for the title of People magazine's 2005 Sexiest Man Alive. While that may be true, he sure seems comfortable enough with the honor, flashing his relaxed, seen-it-all-before grin at a roomful of reporters. One gets the feeling that McConaughey, 36, does not ruffle easily, that he's supremely comfortable in his own skin. If it's an act, it's a good one, earning the Texas native a busy big-screen career, legions of fans - men who admire his attitude, women who admire his pecs - and the welcome opportunity to play onscreen pretty much the same person he is in real life.
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