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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1998
No doubt, there's a great story to be told in the life of Matthew Henson, the African-American who accompanied Robert E. Peary on his Arctic expeditions and may have been the first man to reach the North Pole.Unfortunately, "Glory & Honor," for all its noble intentions, isn't it.Henson, a native of Maryland's Charles County (his great nephew, James E. Henson Sr., is deputy director of the state Commission on Human Rights), served as Peary's personal valet. As such, he accompanied the explorer during a series of Arctic expeditions that began in the 1890s and culminated with the discovery of the pole in 1909.
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By Stephanie Citron and Stephanie Citron,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2009
Annapolis is well-known for its historic vibe. The cobblestone streets, the well-kept Colonial homes, the maritime ties - they're just a few of the highlights that make the city, one of the earliest settlements of Colonists, a destination of choice for history buffs. Nevertheless, even some historians are largely unaware of the significant role that Maryland's capital city has played in the progression of African-American history. Annapolis was a prominent port for slave ships in the 18th century.
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By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2004
James E. Henson Sr. wasn't about to let 6 inches of snow keep him from a speaking engagement yesterday at Howard County's Savage branch library. After all, his great-uncle, Matthew A. Henson, was co-discoverer of the North Pole on April 6, 1909, with Adm. Robert E. Peary. As scheduled, Henson, 67, was in the library's conference room at 2 p.m., ready to talk about Matthew Henson and Josiah Henson, his great-great-great uncle, whose life as a runaway slave and preacher who escaped to Canada was depicted in the anti-slavery novel Uncle Tom's Cabin.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2004
James E. Henson Sr. wasn't about to let 6 inches of snow keep him from a speaking engagement yesterday at Howard County's Savage branch library. After all, his great-uncle, Matthew A. Henson, was co-discoverer of the North Pole on April 6, 1909, with Adm. Robert E. Peary. As scheduled, Henson, 67, was in the library's conference room at 2 p.m., ready to talk about Matthew Henson and Josiah Henson, his great-great-great uncle, whose life as a runaway slave and preacher who escaped to Canada was depicted in the anti-slavery novel Uncle Tom's Cabin.
NEWS
By Clarice Scriber | January 31, 1991
When Herbert M. Frisby flew over the North Pole in 1956, his grandson Russell was just 5 years old, but the event made a lifelong impression on young Russell.As the years passed, Russell Frisby Jr., now a partner in the law firm of Venable, Baetjer and Howard, became more than a spectator in the historical drama of Herbert Frisby. He became the older Frisby's pupil."By the time I was 7," he says, "I could give the tour of the 'Igloo' [the museum in his grandfather's Bateman Avenue home] as well as my grandfather."
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1998
ALL ELEMENTARY classrooms look alike? Try a word wall walk-through.About 30 of us, mostly city school principals, did that one morning last week at Matthew Henson A. Elementary School in (( West Baltimore. We inspected the "walls" (chalkboards, bulletin boards, dividers, easels and real walls) on which teachers display words, and we observed how the instructors use word walls in their teaching.Our guide on this somewhat esoteric mission was Tom Nardone, former principal in New York's Community District 2, one of that city's low-performing districts that turned around rock-bottom reading scores with a successful literacy campaign.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | March 26, 1992
To do well in a math contest, you've got to be quick-witted and have a calculator-like mind, according to 7-year-old John Hodges. But to win it, saying a few prayers won't hurt either, his mother says.John is a third-grader at Matthew A. Henson Elementary School in West Baltimore. He displayed his nimble mind yesterday at Roland Park Elementary School when he won the citywide mathematics contest.Is it easy to win an elementary school math contest?Well, it's no problem if you're up on metric conversions or a have fancy for compound division and multiplication.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff writer | February 28, 1992
King Ramses II was there. Matthew Henson was there. King Tut, Harriet Tubman and George Carruthers also came.The famous and not so famous were on display yesterday at Meade Heights Elementary, as students put on "a living museum of black history."About 75 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders dressed in period costumes to show the life and works of blacks throughout history. Tour guides led the school's kindergarten through third-grade students through the museum -- which had once been the school's gym.The tour began with ancient leaders from Africa.
NEWS
By Stephanie Citron and Stephanie Citron,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2009
Annapolis is well-known for its historic vibe. The cobblestone streets, the well-kept Colonial homes, the maritime ties - they're just a few of the highlights that make the city, one of the earliest settlements of Colonists, a destination of choice for history buffs. Nevertheless, even some historians are largely unaware of the significant role that Maryland's capital city has played in the progression of African-American history. Annapolis was a prominent port for slave ships in the 18th century.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1998
The spirit of African-American explorer Matthew A. Henson returned to Baltimore yesterday aboard the Navy's newest and most sophisticated oceanographic survey ship, the 330-foot USNS Henson.His descendants were there, some on board and others waiting proudly at the dock."One hundred twenty years ago, Matthew Alexander Henson left the Inner Harbor as a 13-year-old cabin boy," said James E. Henson III of Ellicott City, a member of the Maryland Commission on Human Relations and grandnephew of the explorer.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1998
The spirit of African-American explorer Matthew A. Henson returned to Baltimore yesterday aboard the Navy's newest and most sophisticated oceanographic survey ship, the 330-foot USNS Henson.His descendants were there, some on board and others waiting proudly at the dock."One hundred twenty years ago, Matthew Alexander Henson left the Inner Harbor as a 13-year-old cabin boy," said James E. Henson III of Ellicott City, a member of the Maryland Commission on Human Relations and grandnephew of the explorer.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1998
ALL ELEMENTARY classrooms look alike? Try a word wall walk-through.About 30 of us, mostly city school principals, did that one morning last week at Matthew Henson A. Elementary School in (( West Baltimore. We inspected the "walls" (chalkboards, bulletin boards, dividers, easels and real walls) on which teachers display words, and we observed how the instructors use word walls in their teaching.Our guide on this somewhat esoteric mission was Tom Nardone, former principal in New York's Community District 2, one of that city's low-performing districts that turned around rock-bottom reading scores with a successful literacy campaign.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1998
No doubt, there's a great story to be told in the life of Matthew Henson, the African-American who accompanied Robert E. Peary on his Arctic expeditions and may have been the first man to reach the North Pole.Unfortunately, "Glory & Honor," for all its noble intentions, isn't it.Henson, a native of Maryland's Charles County (his great nephew, James E. Henson Sr., is deputy director of the state Commission on Human Rights), served as Peary's personal valet. As such, he accompanied the explorer during a series of Arctic expeditions that began in the 1890s and culminated with the discovery of the pole in 1909.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | March 26, 1992
To do well in a math contest, you've got to be quick-witted and have a calculator-like mind, according to 7-year-old John Hodges. But to win it, saying a few prayers won't hurt either, his mother says.John is a third-grader at Matthew A. Henson Elementary School in West Baltimore. He displayed his nimble mind yesterday at Roland Park Elementary School when he won the citywide mathematics contest.Is it easy to win an elementary school math contest?Well, it's no problem if you're up on metric conversions or a have fancy for compound division and multiplication.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff writer | February 28, 1992
King Ramses II was there. Matthew Henson was there. King Tut, Harriet Tubman and George Carruthers also came.The famous and not so famous were on display yesterday at Meade Heights Elementary, as students put on "a living museum of black history."About 75 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders dressed in period costumes to show the life and works of blacks throughout history. Tour guides led the school's kindergarten through third-grade students through the museum -- which had once been the school's gym.The tour began with ancient leaders from Africa.
NEWS
By Clarice Scriber | January 31, 1991
When Herbert M. Frisby flew over the North Pole in 1956, his grandson Russell was just 5 years old, but the event made a lifelong impression on young Russell.As the years passed, Russell Frisby Jr., now a partner in the law firm of Venable, Baetjer and Howard, became more than a spectator in the historical drama of Herbert Frisby. He became the older Frisby's pupil."By the time I was 7," he says, "I could give the tour of the 'Igloo' [the museum in his grandfather's Bateman Avenue home] as well as my grandfather."
NEWS
October 8, 2000
Cecil Elementary wins library award in reading program BALTIMORE - Cecil Elementary School had the highest participation among all city schools in the Enoch Pratt Free Library's annual summer reading program, the fourth year in a row that Cecil has won the library's Director's Cup award in the program. In all, 250 Cecil Elementary pupils - 61 percent of the student body - took part in the program, reading a total of 2,514 books. Citywide, more than 7,300 children finished the summer reading program.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Staff Writer | May 29, 1993
Harriet Tubman was the leader of the underground railroad who masterminded the escape route from the South for many slaves.Matthew Henson was an explorer recruited by Adm. Robert E. Peary to make the expedition to the North Pole.Kunte Kinte was a slave whose family's story was chronicled for millions of Americans by the late author Alex Haley.These three people are part of Maryland's rich African-American heritage, and state officials want the world to know."We are trying to market Maryland to the African-American market," says Marilyn Corbett, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development (DEED)
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