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By New York Times News Service | June 4, 1994
NEW YORK -- Mattel Inc. made a $79 million bid for the British toy maker J. W. Spear & Sons PLC yesterday, topping a six-day-old offer from its rival, Hasbro Inc., in a battle for the international rights to Scrabble.The bidding pits America's two toy giants against each other for a family-owned company that had $58 million in sales last year from products that include Escape the Blob, Atmosfear, and Doh-nutters. But the squabble is really over Scrabble; Spear owns the rights to it outside North America, and the game accounts for a third of its revenue.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 16, 2014
In a publicity stunt that is sure to irritate 13-year-old boys and feminist scholars, Sports Illustrated and toy-maker Mattel have teamed up for the magazine's 50th anniversary swimsuit issue. Wearing an updated version of the black and white swimsuit she wore when she was introduced in 1959, Barbie appears on a giant billboard mock-up of the magazine cover and in a 4-page photo spread inside the magazine. The doll will also appear on a special edition wrap-cover of about 1,000 issues, and the only ones happy about this will be the 1,000 mothers and wives who won't have to look at three unearthly beautiful topless models who will appear on the actual front of the magazine when it hits newsstands Tuesday.
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BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | July 1, 1992
Q. Since I have three daughters and all seem to love their Barbie dolls and accessories, I thought it was high time to profit from Mattel's success by buying some of its stock. Is this a wise choice for an inexperienced investor?A. The way that famous doll keeps on going, your great-great-grandchildren may one day be playing with "new, improved" Barbies.Based on Barbie's continued popularity and her generous contribution of $750 million in sales to Mattel Inc. (around $24 a share, New York Stock Exchange)
NEWS
By Diane Cameron | March 9, 2009
I was 8 years old when I first met Barbie, and I wanted a life just like hers. She had a boyfriend, Ken; a best friend, Midge; and a lot of clothes. From Barbie, I learned a sartorial approach to existence: You need only to have the right outfit, and the life to go with it will appear. Buy a poofy dress and you get a date for the prom; plan a trousseau and marriage will follow; buy the right suit and a career would materialize. But today, Barbie turns 50, and I don't think she's prepared.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 7, 1991
She has long, beautiful hair, a perfect figure and clothes to die for.Sound like Barbie? Almost: Meet Shani -- the newest Mattel invention for little girls.Shani is an 11 1/2 -inch doll with black features, including a broader nose and fuller lips. Her name means "marvelous" in Swahili, and Shani (SHAW-nee) already is earning that description among kids and retailers; early sales have been strong.But not everyone is enthralled. To some, Shani is reviving unresolved debates about what defines beauty -- especially for black women.
BUSINESS
By Abigail Goldman and Abigail Goldman,Los Angeles Times | March 4, 2007
They're small, fast and made for racing. But they are also pink or purple and sparkly, and come with a tiny doll. Girls are getting their own line of $3 toy race cars this year from the maker of Matchbox - half a century after that brand, now owned by Mattel Inc., introduced its classic die-cast toy for boys. Long after the women's movement prompted equality in playthings, with sewing sets for boys and tool kits for girls, no major toy company had endeavored to create an entire line of miniature die-cast racers just for girls.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | February 7, 1993
New York -- They may still rely on Barbie or G.I. Joe for fun and profits, but the nation's leading toymakers are maturing into the sort of fine young adults Wall Street fancies -- diversified companies with steady income streams and good growth potential.That trend, plus the memory of strong holiday sales, are likely to spark optimism at the sold-out 90th Annual American International Toy Fair, which opens tomorrow in Manhattan. Although many small companies will be gambling -- as they do every year -- that their latest toy will see them through the year, the two biggest toymakers, Hasbro Inc. and Mattel Inc., are looking forward to record profits and growth.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 3, 1996
Mattel Inc. yesterday withdrew a $5.2 billion offer to merge with rival toy maker Hasbro Inc., saying Hasbro's "unbending stance" against the deal had made it impossible to complete the transaction in a timely and friendly manner.In a third letter sent in the last week to Alan Hassenfeld, Hasbro's chairman and chief executive, John Amerman, Mattel's chairman and chief executive, said the "scorched earth" campaign Hasbro has waged since Jan. 23, when Mattel publicly disclosed that its offer had been spurned, "has created an intolerable climate."
NEWS
By Jonathan Peterson and Jonathan Peterson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 13, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Mattel Chief Executive Robert Eckert said yesterday that the toy company has upgraded its methods to keep toys safe from excess lead, and he pointed to overseas contractors as the source of recent problems that have prompted it to announce three recalls affecting more than 20 million toys. "We were let down, and we let you down," Eckert said in testimony to a Senate subcommittee. "We are doing everything we can to prevent this from happening again." Eckert appeared at a hearing in which the head of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said Chinese regulators had agreed to stop U.S. exports of all toys containing lead.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | December 21, 2007
Rep. Elijah E. Cummings announced yesterday that he has asked Mattel Inc. to stop using lead in its toys. Speaking at a news conference at the Union Baptist Head Start Center on Druid Hill Avenue, the Baltimore Democrat accused the company of not doing enough to keep children safe. He focused on the Fisher Price Medical Kit, which according to research by Consumer Reports, contained pieces with lead concentration five times the federal standard. Fisher Price is a subsidiary of Mattel.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2008
Columbia-based Celsion has deal with Japan firm Columbia-based drug maker Celsion Corp. said yesterday that Japanese pharmaceutical firm Yakult Honsha Co. Ltd has agreed to pay up to $20.5 million in licensing fees for the rights to market Celsion's liver cancer treatment, ThermoDox, to the Japanese market. ThermoDox is in a phase 3 clinical trial in the U.S. for liver cancer as well as a phase 2 trial for recurrent chest wall breast cancer. Yakult will pay Celsion $2.5 million, followed by $18 million once ThermoDox gains approval from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare to treat primary liver cancer.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | December 21, 2007
Rep. Elijah E. Cummings announced yesterday that he has asked Mattel Inc. to stop using lead in its toys. Speaking at a news conference at the Union Baptist Head Start Center on Druid Hill Avenue, the Baltimore Democrat accused the company of not doing enough to keep children safe. He focused on the Fisher Price Medical Kit, which according to research by Consumer Reports, contained pieces with lead concentration five times the federal standard. Fisher Price is a subsidiary of Mattel.
NEWS
By Marc Lifsher and Abigail Goldman and Marc Lifsher and Abigail Goldman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 20, 2007
LOS ANGELES -- The California attorney general and the Los Angeles city attorney filed a lawsuit yesterday against Mattel Inc., Toys R Us Inc. and 18 other companies, accusing them of making or selling products that contain "unlawful quantities of lead." The move follows major recalls of toys, lunch boxes, children's jewelry and other goods during the past year by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission in Washington. The suit, filed in Alameda County Superior Court under California's Proposition 65 law, would force manufacturers and retailers to adopt procedures for inspecting products to make sure they are safe.
NEWS
By Jonathan Peterson and Jonathan Peterson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 13, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Mattel Chief Executive Robert Eckert said yesterday that the toy company has upgraded its methods to keep toys safe from excess lead, and he pointed to overseas contractors as the source of recent problems that have prompted it to announce three recalls affecting more than 20 million toys. "We were let down, and we let you down," Eckert said in testimony to a Senate subcommittee. "We are doing everything we can to prevent this from happening again." Eckert appeared at a hearing in which the head of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said Chinese regulators had agreed to stop U.S. exports of all toys containing lead.
NEWS
By Jennifer Tang | September 10, 2007
Mattel's recent recall of lead-tainted toys made in China reminded me of my childhood. As a Chinese-American girl growing up in the 1970s, I was fascinated by Barbie's rear end. Not only was it plump and round, like her prominent breasts, but my doll carried this inscription: "Made in Hong Kong." In the 1960s, long before outsourcing became rampant in other industries, Mattel and other toy manufacturers opened factories in Asia, employing thousands of poor, single women. My mother was one of them.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Stephanie Newton and Hanah Cho and Stephanie Newton,Sun reporters | August 15, 2007
Shopping at Barstons Child's Play in North Baltimore yesterday, Elizabeth Carhuapoma had safety on her mind as she heard news of the latest toy recall by Mattel. "Certain brands I trust more, so it's disappointing when Mattel and Fisher-Price drop the ball," said Carhuapoma, 34, of Baltimore, who bought a Webkinz doll for her 6-year-old son Ethan. "So we got into more specialty stores to get higher-quality toys even though we pay more." While big toy retailers and discounters scrambled yesterday to pull millions of toys from stores across the country, independent shops like Child's Play say a wave of recalls of Chinese imports is bringing in customers worried about lead paint and other hazards.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 18, 2000
Beleaguered toy maker Mattel Inc. said yesterday that its board of directors had unanimously elected Robert A. Eckert as chairman and chief executive officer, ending a three-month external search after the forced departure of Jill Barad. Eckert, 45, resigned Tuesday as president and chief executive of Kraft Foods, the food division of Philip Morris Cos. Eckert's appointment takes effect immediately. "This is a positive step for Mattel; they are putting an end to the uncertainty and bringing in a well-respected manager," said Rick Fradin, an analyst with William Blair.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 20, 1993
In a move that further consolidates the toy industry, Mattel Inc. and Fisher-Price Inc. said yesterday that they would merge in a stock swap valued at $1 billion.Fisher-Price, a leading maker of toys for preschoolers -- including its chattering telephone and bubble-blowing saxophone -- would become a division of Mattel, the nation's second-largest toy company, which makes Barbie, Hot Wheels and Disney infant toys.The combined company is expected to pose a considerable challenge to Hasbro Inc., which itself acquired Tonka Corp.
BUSINESS
By Abigail Goldman and Abigail Goldman,Los Angeles Times | March 4, 2007
They're small, fast and made for racing. But they are also pink or purple and sparkly, and come with a tiny doll. Girls are getting their own line of $3 toy race cars this year from the maker of Matchbox - half a century after that brand, now owned by Mattel Inc., introduced its classic die-cast toy for boys. Long after the women's movement prompted equality in playthings, with sewing sets for boys and tool kits for girls, no major toy company had endeavored to create an entire line of miniature die-cast racers just for girls.
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