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Tim Wheeler | May 29, 2012
The fate of the Chesapeake Bay may be found in its tributaries. Mattawoman Creek, one of the bay's healthiest, is losing ground to development and now stands "at a turning point" as Charles County plans for future growth in its watershed, a state-led task force warns. The combined state-federal task force, led by the Department of Natural Resources , says that the Mattawoman is losing the "near to the ideal" condition that characterized its waters nearly two decades ago. Although its watershed is still largely forested, and the stream itself retains one of the state's most diverse populations of fish, "possible signs of stress associated with human development have appeared.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
Scientists have found reproductive abnormalities in yellow perch in three Maryland rivers that are either heavily suburbanized or rapidly developing, which they say helps explain why the distinctive black-striped fish are not thriving in those Chesapeake Bay tributaries and may be linked to toxic pollution. Significant numbers of eggs produced by spawning female perch in the Severn and South rivers in Anne Arundel County and in Mattawoman Creek in Charles County failed to develop completely, according to a three-year survey conducted by federal and state researchers.
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SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | September 17, 1995
Bobby Smith's call came at just the right time. "Let's go do some bassin' down on Mattawoman Creek tomorrow," he suggested.I had been on vacation all week and frankly had approached my congenial limits on undersized striped bass and doves that failed to materialize in fields that should have been loaded with them. Some largemouth bassing on the tidal Potomac seemed like the perfect cure to an otherwise frustrating week.Famed Potomac bass guide Ken Penrod once told me, "Mattawoman Creek contains the best ratio of largemouth bass age-to-size than any other tidal water in the state," and despite the tremendous amounts of fishing pressure it faces, that statement holds true.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 27, 2012
A conservation group is warning that many of Maryland's counties are skirting a new state law requiring them to rein in development of rural lands. 1000 Friends of Maryland says that more than a third of the state's 23 counties have done little or nothing so far to comply with the Sustainable Growth and Agricultural Preservation Act of 2012 , which aims to restrict new housing on septic systems in rural areas. "What we have are eight counties that are in the red zone," says Dru Schmidt-Perkins, the Friends executive director.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | April 7, 2009
A Charles County creek regarded as one of the Chesapeake Bay's best remaining fish spawning areas has been ranked among the nation's most endangered rivers because of plans for a highway and development across the creek's watershed. Mattawoman Creek, a mostly forested Potomac River tributary that also harbors rare plants, abundant waterfowl and bald eagles, made the list published Tuesday by the environmental group American Rivers. "The river's really at a turning point," said Katherine Baer, a top official with the group, which annually puts out a list of the 10 most endangered waterways.
SPORTS
April 18, 1993
INDIAN HEAD -- The traffic on Mattawoman Creek is heavy for a weekday morning -- a curious beaver and a white-tailed deer having made their way across the creek channel, causing us to slow below the 6-knot speed limit to let them pass -- but it matters little.A balky trolling motor has sent us back toward the launch at Slavin's for repairs, and the pair of beautiful swimmers is a pleasant diversion.The beaver dives and surfaces, takes a peek at the sleek bass boat Ken Penrod has borrowed while awaiting delivery of a new model, and dives again only to surface a few yards further across the channel.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | September 1, 2008
"Frankenfish" has made an appearance, with family, in Charles County, according to local and state officials. Northern snakeheads, the voracious predators capable of surviving for a period out of water, were found last week in puddles near Mattawoman Creek in Charles County, officials said. A native of China, the torpedo-shaped fish made national headlines six years ago after an angler caught one in a Crofton pond. Early last week, the Charles County Sheriff's Office took a television news crew into a patch of woods near Mattawoman Creek to show them the spot where a body was found in a cold-case homicide, said Kristen Timko, a department spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2008
Federal and state officials have scheduled a hearing on Charles County's proposal for a new highway that would require the destruction of 7 acres of wetlands around Mattawoman Creek. The Army Corps of Engineers and Maryland Department of the Environment have scheduled the hearing for 7 p.m. July 31 in the auditorium of the Charles County Government Building, 200 Baltimore St. in La Plata. The agencies will consider whether to allow Charles County to destroy wetlands to build a $60 million roadway called the Cross County Connector, a major east-west road that would replace 74 acres of forest with a strip of blacktop linking proposed subdivisions to the malls in Waldorf.
NEWS
By Andrew H. Macdonald | August 1, 1997
FEW, IF ANY, development proposals in Maryland have generated so much opposition from environmentalists as the Annapolis-sized Chapman's Landing in Charles County. Duringits nearly three-year review, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers received more comments showing why this project should not be approved than for any other permit in the history of the Baltimore District.The Corps' environmental assessment of this project, released late last month, implies that the impact on the Chesapeake Bay and its freshwater tributaries can be controlled by good environmental engineering.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | April 7, 2008
INDIAN HEAD -- Every spring, ribbons of yellow perch eggs flutter in Mattawoman Creek like golden silk stockings. Each comprises thousands of eggs, glassy orbs holding tiny embryos. The Southern Maryland stream is one of the most fertile fish breeding grounds in the Chesapeake Bay region. But state and federal officials warn that it could be destroyed if Charles County carries out its plan to build a four-lane highway across the creek to help serve at least 8,000 new homes planned in the area.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 29, 2012
The fate of the Chesapeake Bay may be found in its tributaries. Mattawoman Creek, one of the bay's healthiest, is losing ground to development and now stands "at a turning point" as Charles County plans for future growth in its watershed, a state-led task force warns. The combined state-federal task force, led by the Department of Natural Resources , says that the Mattawoman is losing the "near to the ideal" condition that characterized its waters nearly two decades ago. Although its watershed is still largely forested, and the stream itself retains one of the state's most diverse populations of fish, "possible signs of stress associated with human development have appeared.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 9, 2012
If we're serious about getting the invasive snakeheads under control before they eat all the other fish in the Chesapeake watershed, then let me suggest that we get serious about the bounty. Those $200 gift certificates from a major outdoors retailer are nice, but there are only three of them, and those who catch a snakehead have to enter a drawing to win them, and the drawing isn't until November. That's not much of an incentive. Let's engage in some bigger thinking about this.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | April 7, 2009
A Charles County creek regarded as one of the Chesapeake Bay's best remaining fish spawning areas has been ranked among the nation's most endangered rivers because of plans for a highway and development across the creek's watershed. Mattawoman Creek, a mostly forested Potomac River tributary that also harbors rare plants, abundant waterfowl and bald eagles, made the list published Tuesday by the environmental group American Rivers. "The river's really at a turning point," said Katherine Baer, a top official with the group, which annually puts out a list of the 10 most endangered waterways.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | September 1, 2008
"Frankenfish" has made an appearance, with family, in Charles County, according to local and state officials. Northern snakeheads, the voracious predators capable of surviving for a period out of water, were found last week in puddles near Mattawoman Creek in Charles County, officials said. A native of China, the torpedo-shaped fish made national headlines six years ago after an angler caught one in a Crofton pond. Early last week, the Charles County Sheriff's Office took a television news crew into a patch of woods near Mattawoman Creek to show them the spot where a body was found in a cold-case homicide, said Kristen Timko, a department spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2008
Federal and state officials have scheduled a hearing on Charles County's proposal for a new highway that would require the destruction of 7 acres of wetlands around Mattawoman Creek. The Army Corps of Engineers and Maryland Department of the Environment have scheduled the hearing for 7 p.m. July 31 in the auditorium of the Charles County Government Building, 200 Baltimore St. in La Plata. The agencies will consider whether to allow Charles County to destroy wetlands to build a $60 million roadway called the Cross County Connector, a major east-west road that would replace 74 acres of forest with a strip of blacktop linking proposed subdivisions to the malls in Waldorf.
NEWS
April 14, 2008
Is highway expansion a threat to watershed? The Sun's telling article about the plight of Mattawoman Creek emphasizes that land-use decisions are in the hands of local officials ("Highway threatens creek filled with life," April 7). However, state and federal agencies have the permitting tools that can curtail destructive local policies. In this case, Mattawoman Creek is threatened by a Charles County "development district" larger than the District of Columbia that blankets Maryland's most productive tributary to the largest estuary in the world, the Chesapeake Bay. Calling the development of a huge, largely forested area "Smart Growth" attempts to greenwash with modern concepts a decades-old and outmoded plan for sprawl.
NEWS
July 19, 1999
Local landscaping firm wins national safety awardsAspen Grove Landscape of Millersville has been awarded two national safety awards -- the "No Lost Time Accidents" and "No Vehicle Accidents" awards -- in the Associated Landscape Contractors of America Safety Contest.The contest is divided into categories according to the total number of hours worked during the contest period. The Fleet Contest recognizes firms with good vehicle safety records.The Associated Landscape Contractors of America is a national trade association serving professional interior and exterior landscape contracting firms throughout the United States.
NEWS
April 14, 2008
Is highway expansion a threat to watershed? The Sun's telling article about the plight of Mattawoman Creek emphasizes that land-use decisions are in the hands of local officials ("Highway threatens creek filled with life," April 7). However, state and federal agencies have the permitting tools that can curtail destructive local policies. In this case, Mattawoman Creek is threatened by a Charles County "development district" larger than the District of Columbia that blankets Maryland's most productive tributary to the largest estuary in the world, the Chesapeake Bay. Calling the development of a huge, largely forested area "Smart Growth" attempts to greenwash with modern concepts a decades-old and outmoded plan for sprawl.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | April 7, 2008
INDIAN HEAD -- Every spring, ribbons of yellow perch eggs flutter in Mattawoman Creek like golden silk stockings. Each comprises thousands of eggs, glassy orbs holding tiny embryos. The Southern Maryland stream is one of the most fertile fish breeding grounds in the Chesapeake Bay region. But state and federal officials warn that it could be destroyed if Charles County carries out its plan to build a four-lane highway across the creek to help serve at least 8,000 new homes planned in the area.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2005
IF WE WERE unschooled, but attuned to nature, instead of the other way around, we wouldn't need to study and dissect all the ways water dies as you develop its watershed. We would just accept that when you keep wounding any animal - in this case the watershed, the creature containing all other creatures - as you replace its living, breathing skin with dead concrete and asphalt, you are killing it. Eventually, modern ecological science does tend to bring us to the same place as native wisdom.
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