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By Los Angeles Times | March 28, 1991
''Past Midnight,'' shooting in Seattle, stars Rutger Hauer and Natasha Richardson in a psychological thriller about a social worker who befriends a client convicted of a heinous murder. Also shooting in Seattle is ''Singles'' for Warner Bros. Cameron Crowe follows "Say Anything" with this romantic comedy that looks at a group of young folks who alternately search for and run from that thing called love. Bridget Fonda, Campbell Scott, Kyra Sedgwick, Shella Kelly, Matt Dillon and Bill Pullman are in the cast.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | September 8, 2006
The American writer and poet Charles Bukowski is certainly an acquired taste, and Factotum may be just the film for determining whether one wants to acquire it. Based largely on Bukowski's autobiographical 1975 novel, the movie stars Matt Dillon as Bukowski's stand-in, Henry Chinaski. Factotum doesn't let us in on much of Chinaski's background, but his present is plenty bleak enough to help us fill in the blanks. A cynical, iconoclastic drifter whose only ambition is to write, Chinaski wafts from menial job to menial job, rarely keeping them for more than a few days (mostly because he spends more time at the nearest bar than on the job)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | September 8, 2006
The American writer and poet Charles Bukowski is certainly an acquired taste, and Factotum may be just the film for determining whether one wants to acquire it. Based largely on Bukowski's autobiographical 1975 novel, the movie stars Matt Dillon as Bukowski's stand-in, Henry Chinaski. Factotum doesn't let us in on much of Chinaski's background, but his present is plenty bleak enough to help us fill in the blanks. A cynical, iconoclastic drifter whose only ambition is to write, Chinaski wafts from menial job to menial job, rarely keeping them for more than a few days (mostly because he spends more time at the nearest bar than on the job)
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December 30, 2005
Today, The Sun's movie critics publish their picks of the best films of 2005. Last week, we asked you to send in your choice, and to briefly tell us your reasons. Here are some of your submissions. Cinderella Man. This was a good old-fashioned movie celebrating the great American work ethic, and the rewards of hard work and good character. And any movie that can feature Russell Crowe as a likable, nay lovable, character gets my vote. Also, it was a really interesting story! ALICE ANDERSON, TOWSON The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 26, 1991
'A Kiss Before Dying'Starring Matt Dillon and Sean Young.Directed by James Dearden.Released by Universal.Rated R.** 1/2 "A Kiss Before Dying" isn't so much told, like a story, as it is plotted, like a graph. It derives from Ira Levin's first (and best) novel, written in the early '50s when the then 23-year-old author was waiting to go into the Army. The book lacks depth, insight, irony and meaning, which makes it perfect for the '90s. On top of that, it is deviously clever, strictly a bonus in today's film culture.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1996
Quite a potpourri on TV tonight, everything from monkeys taking over the world to young adults taking over Seattle, plus a little cross-network visitation between CBS and NBC."Singles" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Writer-director Cameron Crowe's 1992 chronicle of a group of young adults living and loving in Seattle features a top-notch cast, including Bridget Fonda, Matt Dillon, Kyra Sedgwick, Sheila Kelley and Campbell Scott. Even Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder shows up, as a member of Matt Dillon's band.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
It may be early yet, but here's betting there won't be a more hilarious film all year than "Wild Things."Problem is, it's not meant to be funny.Fortunately, that small matter does not detract from the hilarity of such scenes as Kevin Bacon's face when he spies two teen-age girls lip-locked in the family pool, or Neve Campbell trying to convincingly talk like ignorant gutter trash, or stone-faced Robert Wagner as a macho lawyer who comes off as threatening as...
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 20, 1996
"Grace of my Heart" is a rudderless drift down the surging current of American popular music from the late '50s through the late '70s.It stops for the longest time at the Brill Building in the early '60s, that font of musical inventiveness at 1619 Broadway where some of the great songs of the culture were written. Unfortunately, it cannot re-create them; more unfortunately, that harms the film, particularly when versions of such greats as "Leader of the Pack" arrive in approximated form. If you've been to Smokey Joe's Cafe on Broadway, and heard Lieber and Stoller's real stuff, hot and heavy and delivered with soul and passion, "Grace of My Heart's" take tastes like it's been stored in Tupperware too long.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | May 28, 1992
Bad news, pardner. Now that the trail dust has settled on the network announcements of their fall television schedules, one of TV's oldest genres, the western, seems once again to have ridden off into the sunset."
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | April 26, 1991
KISS Before Dying'' is a neatly written, nicely paced murder melodrama that fully justifies its 95 minutes length.Based on the book by Ira Levin (''Rosemary's Baby''), ''A Kiss Before Dying'' raises a few questions, most of which are easily answered or overlooked by those willing to coast with the premise.It should be easier to go along with the premise of a psychopathic killer today, certainly easier than when the book was first written, or when when the first film version was done in 1956 starring Joanne Woodward and Robert Wagner.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 19, 2004
Poisonous sarin gas is released in a London hotel, killing more than a dozen civilians. A terrorist cell, probably al-Qaida, is behind it and expected to strike again ... soon ... with a major attack in the subways of New York. The clock is ticking ... That's the set-up for The Grid, a new limited series premiering tonight at 9 on cable channel TNT. The six-hour, four-night series is structured along the lines of the 2003 Traffick miniseries (USA), which used whip-around storytelling to deal with drug smuggling, but its heaviest debt in subject matter, style and tone is to 24, the Fox action-drama starring Kiefer Sutherland as counter-terrorist agent Jack Bauer.
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By David Kronke and David Kronke,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 9, 1998
The money shot in "There's Something About Mary" - well, actually, the first of many that declare these are the filmmakers who will take gross-out gags into the next millennium - is, by co-director and writer Peter Farrelly's own admission, "just stunningly inappropriate."Peter's brother and collaborator, Bobby Farrelly, recalls with pride the moment when an executive from 20th Century Fox, the studio releasing "Mary," told him that a particular punch line was "perfectly reprehensible.""There's Something About Mary," a romantic comedy on its way to becoming the summer's sleeper hit, is brought to you by the guys who made "Dumb and Dumber" - which found Jeff Daniels at the mercy of powerful laxatives and an even more powerful sound-effects editor - and "Kingpin," in which Woody Harrelson spat out a brutal parody of the "Got Milk?"
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
It may be early yet, but here's betting there won't be a more hilarious film all year than "Wild Things."Problem is, it's not meant to be funny.Fortunately, that small matter does not detract from the hilarity of such scenes as Kevin Bacon's face when he spies two teen-age girls lip-locked in the family pool, or Neve Campbell trying to convincingly talk like ignorant gutter trash, or stone-faced Robert Wagner as a macho lawyer who comes off as threatening as...
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 20, 1996
"Grace of my Heart" is a rudderless drift down the surging current of American popular music from the late '50s through the late '70s.It stops for the longest time at the Brill Building in the early '60s, that font of musical inventiveness at 1619 Broadway where some of the great songs of the culture were written. Unfortunately, it cannot re-create them; more unfortunately, that harms the film, particularly when versions of such greats as "Leader of the Pack" arrive in approximated form. If you've been to Smokey Joe's Cafe on Broadway, and heard Lieber and Stoller's real stuff, hot and heavy and delivered with soul and passion, "Grace of My Heart's" take tastes like it's been stored in Tupperware too long.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1996
Quite a potpourri on TV tonight, everything from monkeys taking over the world to young adults taking over Seattle, plus a little cross-network visitation between CBS and NBC."Singles" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Writer-director Cameron Crowe's 1992 chronicle of a group of young adults living and loving in Seattle features a top-notch cast, including Bridget Fonda, Matt Dillon, Kyra Sedgwick, Sheila Kelley and Campbell Scott. Even Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder shows up, as a member of Matt Dillon's band.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 28, 1994
Like so many stories, this one began in a bar with a group of guys throwing down shots and yakking about the ways things happen and why. It's a ubiquitous ceremony among the peoples of the world, and the peoples of this world happened to be Chinese-American. And one of them was the astonishingly accomplished young playwrigh David Henry Hwang, author of the renowned "M. Butterfly."But even playwrights can learn. What Hwang learned that day was that in the early 1950s, the FBI, seeking a communist-free America, mounted an assault on San Francisco's Chinese-American community.
FEATURES
December 30, 2005
Today, The Sun's movie critics publish their picks of the best films of 2005. Last week, we asked you to send in your choice, and to briefly tell us your reasons. Here are some of your submissions. Cinderella Man. This was a good old-fashioned movie celebrating the great American work ethic, and the rewards of hard work and good character. And any movie that can feature Russell Crowe as a likable, nay lovable, character gets my vote. Also, it was a really interesting story! ALICE ANDERSON, TOWSON The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 19, 2004
Poisonous sarin gas is released in a London hotel, killing more than a dozen civilians. A terrorist cell, probably al-Qaida, is behind it and expected to strike again ... soon ... with a major attack in the subways of New York. The clock is ticking ... That's the set-up for The Grid, a new limited series premiering tonight at 9 on cable channel TNT. The six-hour, four-night series is structured along the lines of the 2003 Traffick miniseries (USA), which used whip-around storytelling to deal with drug smuggling, but its heaviest debt in subject matter, style and tone is to 24, the Fox action-drama starring Kiefer Sutherland as counter-terrorist agent Jack Bauer.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | May 28, 1992
Bad news, pardner. Now that the trail dust has settled on the network announcements of their fall television schedules, one of TV's oldest genres, the western, seems once again to have ridden off into the sunset."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,Newsday | May 15, 1992
It is the morning after the Rodney King verdict and Danny Glover looks haggard and drawn. Understandable, since he worked until 2 a.m. on "The Saint of Fort Washington," a film he's co-producing and co-starring in (with Matt Dillon) as a homeless man. He and Mr. Dillon were shooting take after take in the dark, chilly Manhattan streets.And yet here he is, arriving at 8:45 a.m. sharp at a Park Avenue office suite, wearing leather sandals and a light beige suit. Though the whites in his large expressive eyes seem stained with fatigue, he is ready to settle in for interviews connected with "Lethal Weapon 3," the latest in a lucrative series of cop-chase carnivals pairing Mr. Glover, as veteran Los Angeles police detective Roger Murtaugh, with Mel Gibson, as Murtaugh's gonzo partner Martin Riggs.
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