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NEWS
March 31, 1997
RARELY in American history has it been so crucial and difficult for the Republic to conduct a criminal trial both effectively and fairly as in the case against Timothy McVeigh that is scheduled to begin today in Denver.Defense requests for postponements, based on these difficulties, continued till the last. The alleged accomplice in the April 1995 bombing of the federal office building in Oklahoma City that killed 168 people and wounded 500, Terry Nichols, will be tried separately.The bombing was a crime of anarchy against the state.
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NEWS
September 18, 2001
In Washington Bush pick for EPA job withdraws in face of Senate opposition President Bush's nominee to head enforcement at the Environmental Protection Agency withdrew his name yesterday after encountering Senate opposition over his role in opposing some air cleanup measures in Ohio. "It is clear to me ... that my nomination will not be considered by the U.S. Senate in a timely manner," Donald Schregardus said in a letter yesterday to Bush. Independent Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont, chairman of the Senate Environmental and Public Works Committee, had promised to spend months scrutinizing Schregardus' record as head of Ohio's EPA before allowing a vote.
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NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 1, 1997
DENVER -- In U.S. District Judge Richard P. Matsch's courtroom, proceedings start exactly on time. Windy lawyers are ordered to stop speechifying. Coats are not slung over chairs. There are no commercial television cameras.In Matsch's courtroom, where Timothy J. McVeigh is on trial charged with bombing the Oklahoma City federal building, attorneys are expected to be as well-prepared as the judge, to make their points and to sit down."He's the anti-Ito," says Andrew Cohen, a Denver lawyer and legal analyst.
NEWS
By Thomas Healy and Thomas Healy,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 7, 2001
WASHINGTON - A federal judge in Denver rejected Timothy J. McVeigh's request for a stay of execution yesterday, ruling that documents recently released by the FBI do not cast doubt on his responsibility for the Oklahoma City bombing. The decision, which surprised some legal experts who thought the judge might give McVeigh's attorneys additional time to review the 4,400 pages of documents, is not the final word on whether the execution will proceed as planned Monday morning. McVeigh's attorneys said they would file an appeal today with the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver, which could rule on the matter within hours of receiving the case.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 4, 1997
DENVER -- A 10-year-old will talk of his dead mother. A rescuer will describe how the pulse ebbed from a trapped woman's hand. And defense lawyers will call Timothy J. McVeigh's relatives to plead for his life as a jury today begins considering how he should be punished for the Oklahoma City bombing.The testimony in the sentencing phase of the case against McVeigh, which opens today, promises to be even more emotional than the stories that drew tears from some jurors during the trial.But Judge Richard P. Matsch, ruling that "a penalty-phase hearing cannot be turned into some kind of lynching," limited the evidence that prosecutors had hoped to show the jury.
NEWS
September 18, 2001
In Washington Bush pick for EPA job withdraws in face of Senate opposition President Bush's nominee to head enforcement at the Environmental Protection Agency withdrew his name yesterday after encountering Senate opposition over his role in opposing some air cleanup measures in Ohio. "It is clear to me ... that my nomination will not be considered by the U.S. Senate in a timely manner," Donald Schregardus said in a letter yesterday to Bush. Independent Sen. James M. Jeffords of Vermont, chairman of the Senate Environmental and Public Works Committee, had promised to spend months scrutinizing Schregardus' record as head of Ohio's EPA before allowing a vote.
NEWS
By Thomas Healy and Thomas Healy,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 7, 2001
WASHINGTON - A federal judge in Denver rejected Timothy J. McVeigh's request for a stay of execution yesterday, ruling that documents recently released by the FBI do not cast doubt on his responsibility for the Oklahoma City bombing. The decision, which surprised some legal experts who thought the judge might give McVeigh's attorneys additional time to review the 4,400 pages of documents, is not the final word on whether the execution will proceed as planned Monday morning. McVeigh's attorneys said they would file an appeal today with the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver, which could rule on the matter within hours of receiving the case.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 3, 1998
Terry L. Nichols has finally begun to speak, yet it appears he has a lot more explaining to do.Nichols, the convicted co-conspirator with Timothy J. McVeigh in the Oklahoma City bombing, recently sent a 16-page letter to the federal judge in Denver who will decide whether he will ever be allowed to walk out of prison a free man.The letter, along with 28 notes from Nichols' relatives, friends, teachers and former employers, sought to show him as a loving family...
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 8, 1997
Someone needs to tell Judge Richard P. Matsch exactly what a lynching is. The man hasn't a scintilla of a clue. Those fancy law books filled with lawyerese and other assorted gobbledygook don't seem to have helped him any.Matsch is the judge presiding over Timothy McVeigh's trial in Denver. After McVeigh was convicted of murder in the deaths resulting from the explosion that devastated the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City in April 1995, the trial moved into what is called the penalty phase.
NEWS
By Andrew Cohen | June 22, 1997
Where do we go from here? When that question about the criminal justice system was asked after the first O.J. Simpson trial in October 1995, a pessimistic answer inevitably followed. The system was broken. Lawyers were charlatans. Judges were fools. Law enforcement officials were incompetent worms. And the media were just a bunch of whores.That was then. How about now? So where does the criminal justice system go from here, June 1997, after the trial and conviction of Timothy J. McVeigh? What lessons did we learn, what paradigms can we recognize, what mistakes can we avoid?
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 3, 1998
Terry L. Nichols has finally begun to speak, yet it appears he has a lot more explaining to do.Nichols, the convicted co-conspirator with Timothy J. McVeigh in the Oklahoma City bombing, recently sent a 16-page letter to the federal judge in Denver who will decide whether he will ever be allowed to walk out of prison a free man.The letter, along with 28 notes from Nichols' relatives, friends, teachers and former employers, sought to show him as a loving family...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 1998
DENVER -- Terry L. Nichols escaped the death penalty yesterday, after a deeply divided federal jury said it could not decide just how active a role he played in planning the bombing that killed 168 people in Oklahoma City's federal building.Judge Richard P. Matsch excused jurors yesterday morning and will sentence Nichols to a life term or, possibly, a lesser term. Under federal law, only the jury could have given Nichols the death penalty, the sentence that was given to his co-conspirator, Timothy J. McVeigh.
NEWS
By Andrew Cohen | June 22, 1997
Where do we go from here? When that question about the criminal justice system was asked after the first O.J. Simpson trial in October 1995, a pessimistic answer inevitably followed. The system was broken. Lawyers were charlatans. Judges were fools. Law enforcement officials were incompetent worms. And the media were just a bunch of whores.That was then. How about now? So where does the criminal justice system go from here, June 1997, after the trial and conviction of Timothy J. McVeigh? What lessons did we learn, what paradigms can we recognize, what mistakes can we avoid?
NEWS
June 17, 1997
Judge Matsch shows judiciary how to run a trialWasn't it refreshing to see the trial of Timothy McVeigh handled in a professional manner? The difference between this trial and the O. J. Simpson fiasco boils down to one thing -- the judge.From the very beginning of the Denver trial, Judge Richard Matsch let it be known no nonsense would be tolerated, and he would be 100 percent in command of the court -- not the lawyers or the media.By mandating a gag order and not allowing live television, most of the circus atmosphere that occurred in the Simpson trial was avoided.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 8, 1997
Someone needs to tell Judge Richard P. Matsch exactly what a lynching is. The man hasn't a scintilla of a clue. Those fancy law books filled with lawyerese and other assorted gobbledygook don't seem to have helped him any.Matsch is the judge presiding over Timothy McVeigh's trial in Denver. After McVeigh was convicted of murder in the deaths resulting from the explosion that devastated the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City in April 1995, the trial moved into what is called the penalty phase.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 4, 1997
DENVER -- A 10-year-old will talk of his dead mother. A rescuer will describe how the pulse ebbed from a trapped woman's hand. And defense lawyers will call Timothy J. McVeigh's relatives to plead for his life as a jury today begins considering how he should be punished for the Oklahoma City bombing.The testimony in the sentencing phase of the case against McVeigh, which opens today, promises to be even more emotional than the stories that drew tears from some jurors during the trial.But Judge Richard P. Matsch, ruling that "a penalty-phase hearing cannot be turned into some kind of lynching," limited the evidence that prosecutors had hoped to show the jury.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 1998
DENVER -- Terry L. Nichols escaped the death penalty yesterday, after a deeply divided federal jury said it could not decide just how active a role he played in planning the bombing that killed 168 people in Oklahoma City's federal building.Judge Richard P. Matsch excused jurors yesterday morning and will sentence Nichols to a life term or, possibly, a lesser term. Under federal law, only the jury could have given Nichols the death penalty, the sentence that was given to his co-conspirator, Timothy J. McVeigh.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 2, 1997
DENVER -- After a morning of deliberations, the jury in the Oklahoma City bombing trial took a sunny Sunday afternoon off to relax. And that only made the victims of the blast more anxious as they waited through a third day for a verdict in the trial of Timothy J. McVeigh."
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 2, 1997
DENVER -- After a morning of deliberations, the jury in the Oklahoma City bombing trial took a sunny Sunday afternoon off to relax. And that only made the victims of the blast more anxious as they waited through a third day for a verdict in the trial of Timothy J. McVeigh."
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 1, 1997
DENVER -- In U.S. District Judge Richard P. Matsch's courtroom, proceedings start exactly on time. Windy lawyers are ordered to stop speechifying. Coats are not slung over chairs. There are no commercial television cameras.In Matsch's courtroom, where Timothy J. McVeigh is on trial charged with bombing the Oklahoma City federal building, attorneys are expected to be as well-prepared as the judge, to make their points and to sit down."He's the anti-Ito," says Andrew Cohen, a Denver lawyer and legal analyst.
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