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By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2003
Peter Casazza is big on The Matrix and its two sequels, knows all about the world the Wachowski brothers created, where machines rule, using mankind as fuel for their grand designs, and where human experience is only an illusion. He can relate to the movies' themes, gets caught up in the idea of fighting against the established society and its mores, understands the notion that free will is worth fighting for. But he's not planning on going out and killing anyone. "Entertainment is entertainment," says Casazza, who works at Big Planet Comics in Bethesda.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Due to what are being described as "unforeseen contractual issues related to the production," the Baltimore Symphony has canceled "Matrix Live," a concert that had been scheduled for July 13 at Meyerhoff Hall as part of the orchestra's summer season. "Matrix Live," which combines a showing of the 1999 Academy Award-winning film with live soundtrack, has been presented by several orchestras in this country and abroad. Patrons who purchased tickets to the BSO event will receive refunds.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | April 4, 1999
The Matrix," a cautionary tale about what happens when the machines take over, promises a movie experience like no other. It's a claim the film lives up to, thanks in large part to special effects that enable bullets to stop in midair, combatants to defy gravity and kung-fu kicks to be delivered with lightning speed and precision (by someone who's not Jackie Chan). But "The Matrix" isn't the first film to promise the never-before-experienced. Here are a half-dozen others that lived up to their advance billing.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | February 4, 2013
Dr. Carlyn Buckler, director of the Mastodon Matrix Project in Cornell, N.Y., visited the Bel Air library Jan. 7 to share her enthusiasm for mastodons with replicas of a few finds her team had excavated in New York. Teeth and tusk examples were the highlights of the evening as she explained to more than 50 audience members how important it is for regular citizens to get involved in citizen science projects. Buckler was invited to Harford County to kick off the library's involvement in the Mastodon Matrix Project in which Harford residents will help trained investigators sort through and analyze the sediment or "matrix" found around the bones from a real mastodon dig and submit their results to the Museum of the Earth.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 5, 2003
The Matrix Revolutions blends feather-brained, starry-eyed camp and rock-'em-sock-'em spectacle - so it's at least more entertaining than the second Matrix film, which hung in the air like a noxious cloud. What's almost endearing about this final chapter in the Matrix trilogy is its dime-store romanticism. We learn that underneath the philosophic folderol, the Matrix franchise has a motto akin to the 1973 New York Mets' "You Gotta Believe" and identical to the City of Baltimore's one-word, clean-up-the-streets slogan "Believe."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark I. Pinsky and Mark I. Pinsky,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 25, 2003
Even before the house lights come up in the theater, while the final credits for The Matrix Reloaded are still rolling, the arguments begin. Is the character named Neo the Messiah? Will Zion be destroyed? Is the last face seen on the screen supposed to be Judas? The discussions, some of them heated, continue as viewers file from the multiplex and spill out under the marquee. As Matrix mania continues to sweep the country, Americans are debating whether the much anticipated sequel is just another science-fiction action movie, or a spiritually significant film rife with profound religious symbolism.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2003
CHESAPEAKE, Va. - Consumed with righting racial inequality and injustice, sniper suspect Lee Boyd Malvo became yesterday the latest young defendant to use the film The Matrix as part of an insanity defense to explain killings that seem to have no clear explanation. The 1999 film has been used, with some success, in at least three other murder cases in which young defendants attempted to justify their crimes with allusions to the movie's philosophy that the world people live in is only a dream sequence controlled by a computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Staff | November 9, 2003
The other day, I decided to take in a movie. First I shampooed, conditioned, amplified, hydrated and styled my hair, using the complete line of Matrix hair care products. Then I hopped in my new Toyota Matrix and headed to the theater to see the latest Matrix movie. I got home just in time to turn on the set and catch the new TV series, Threat Matrix. OK, I'm lying. I don't use Matrix hair-care products or drive a Matrix. I have not seen the movie, The Matrix, nor either of its sequels, The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Monty Phan and Monty Phan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2003
The Matrix Reloaded is the sequel. "The Matrix Overloaded" could be the marketing campaign. Anyone wondering what the Wachowski brothers have been up to since their creation The Matrix debuted in 1999? You're about to find out. In the kind of synergistic roll-outs that make media-conglomerate executives salivate, Andy and Larry Wachowski have written and directed two sequels -- Reloaded, which hits theaters today, and The Matrix Revolutions, due in November -- and have helped in the production of a video game and a DVD of animated short films inspired by the trilogy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,los angeles daily news | April 11, 1999
LOS ANGELES -- In many ways, "The Matrix" represents the next step in high-tech action moviemaking. And, if its target audience of sensation-seeking young males can follow its convoluted plot, the film also might represent a new leap of intelligence for the notoriously dumbed-down genre."
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | September 9, 2011
This has nothing to do with the Ravens or the Steelers, so I apologize for that. But we found out Thursday night that touchdowns on kickoff returns are still indeed possible. It just takes a perfectly-timed barrel roll over a defender. Here is proof in the form of Randall Cobb's "Matrix"-like return in Green Bay's win over New Orleans.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2008
outdoor types Summertime pops: The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra will perform light favorites and pop classics. Bring blankets and chairs for field seating for the show at 6 p.m. Saturday at Quiet Waters Park, 600 Quiet Waters Park Road, Annapolis. The show is free. Call 410-269-1132 or go to annapolissymphony.org. Ragin' on the River: The 5th Annual Ragin' on the River powerboat races come Saturday and Sunday to the Susquehanna River in Port Deposit. Gates open at 10 a.m. at Marina Park.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH | March 24, 2008
And so it turns out that the big $45 million-plus box office for Dr. Seuss' Horton Hears a Who! was not an audience of children after all; it is teenagers and young adults without kids who are driving the ticket sales. Diablo finds love If you saw the Oscars or even the photo aftermath, you know that Academy Award-winning screenwriter Diablo Cody was the one who wowed everybody with her big tattoo, her snazzy leopard dress and her history as a former stripper. Now comes romance. She is said to be the apple of the eye of British director Edgar Wright, whose magnum opus was titled Shaun of the Dead.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | January 28, 2008
A hotel and shopping arcade attached to Pennsylvania Station. A performing arts center operated by faith-based groups. Acres of parks and recreational space along the Jones Falls Valley. A 60-story tower containing two-story "live-work" condos. Four blocks filled with "incubator" shops and studios for artists, artisans and other creative types. Those are a few of the ideas suggested for revitalizing Charles North, the 100-acre arts and entertainment district centered on Charles Street and North Avenue in midtown Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Alex Pham and Alex Pham,Los Angeles Times | July 2, 2007
Soulless. Repetitive. Clunky. Those are some of the kinder words that critics have bestowed on video games based on Hollywood films. But many of those games have still sold well thanks to the movie marketing blitz that accompanies box-office releases. For example, the Enter the Matrix game, which one critic called "astoundingly dull," sold 2.3 million copies in the United States. The James Bond title GoldenEye: Rogue Agent rated an average of 65 percent -- the equivalent of an F -- from more than 200 reviews, according to GameRankings.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | April 30, 2007
ATLANTA -- So what sort of presidential campaign do you run if you're too liberal for conservatives, you're too Republican for Democrats, and you drag along a personal life too messy for moderates? Rudolph W. Giuliani has just answered that question: He'll be counting on the fear factor. Mr. Giuliani has become the first Republican presidential candidate to enthusiastically embrace the Karl Rove strategy of scaring voters into becoming supporters. Campaigning in New Hampshire last week, Mr. Giuliani declared that if a Democrat were to be elected president in 2008, he (or she)
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | September 9, 2011
This has nothing to do with the Ravens or the Steelers, so I apologize for that. But we found out Thursday night that touchdowns on kickoff returns are still indeed possible. It just takes a perfectly-timed barrel roll over a defender. Here is proof in the form of Randall Cobb's "Matrix"-like return in Green Bay's win over New Orleans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Greg Morago and Greg Morago,Hartford Courant | September 18, 2003
Fifteen minutes of fame? In this day and age, that's about 14 minutes and 55 seconds too long for most Americans to digest. We live in a society where our attention span is roughly equal to the time it takes for Bill O'Reilly to start foaming at the mouth. That's only seconds. And yet there are pop culture events coming up for fall and winter that will test our concentration, patience and ability to digest multiple installments. Will we have the attention span to stay with the following?
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | February 16, 2007
Billionaire investor Carl C. Icahn has bought 2.8 million shares of MedImmune Inc. stock, a 1.2 percent stake that's large enough to fuel speculation that Maryland's largest biotech company is headed for a shake-up. New York investment group Matrix Asset Advisors, which owns about 1.7 million shares of MedImmune, or about 0.7 percent of the company, has been pushing for the Gaithersburg-based company to be sold. In a letter sent to MedImmune's board of directors Tuesday - the third of its kind - Matrix President David A. Katz said he was concerned shareholders were suffering "because of management's inability to deliver on its guidance and proffered expectations."
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | December 24, 2006
Someday David Katz's wish will come true, and Abbott Laboratories or some other huge pharmaceutical company will buy MedImmune, Maryland's largest biotech company. MedImmune and Big Pharma each has something the other lacks. MedImmune has drugs in development that might someday be prescribed by doctors. Big Pharma has armies of salespeople who give doctors cool pens. But don't expect the match to happen for a long time. Big Pharma isn't desperate enough to overpay for MedImmune, although it's getting closer.
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