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By GILBERT SANDLER | January 12, 1993
THIS story begins in the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in New York the day its spectacular Matisse retrospective opened last September. It reels backward to Oakland, Calif., and to Baltimore in 1898. It then moves forward to Paris in 1905.And then back once more -- to Baltimore the afternoon of Dec. 17, 1930.Before its end, the story interconnects homes and streets in Baltimore with the lives of Gertrude Stein (she of the Lost Generation); her brother Leo; two wealthy Baltimore sisters and art patrons, Etta and Claribel Cone (who collected in their Eutaw Place apartment the works of, among other artists, Henri Matisse)
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NEWS
November 25, 2013
BUCHAREST - The leader of a Romanian gang that stole paintings from a Dutch museum in one of the world's biggest art heists could be sentenced this week to up to 18 years in prison, according to a statement by his lawyer Tuesday. Radu Dogaru's sentencing is among upcoming events this week that also include likely testimony by fascist leaders in Greece, the release of new housing indicators in the United States and the premiere of a new film featuring former  Wire  star Idris Elba.
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NEWS
May 31, 1994
The current Matisse exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art reminded Franklin Mason, a retired Evening Sun copy reader, of the great French painter's visit to Baltimore. Under the headline ''Cultural Rumor'' The Sun editorialized on December 17, 1930, about the possibility that Matisse might immortalize Baltimore on canvas. He visited his patrons, the Cone sisters, but Baltimore remained uncelebrated in the master's style -- except in the drawing reproduced here, titled ''Charles Street Evening -- or Matisse Comes to Baltimore, with Respectful Apologies,'' by The Sun's Edmund Duffy.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
It's one of the ironies of the art world that major cultural institutions like the Baltimore Museum of Art are home to priceless collections of paintings, sculpture and other works by the world's greatest masters, yet they often struggle to come up with money to fix a leaky roof, pay the electricity bill or hire staff. We'd hesitate to guess the value of the BMA's holdings, but surely the total must reach into the hundreds of millions of dollars. Yet no museum that valued its reputation could sell off a Picasso or a Matisse every time the basement flooded or a heating and air-conditioning unit failed.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun reporter | October 21, 2007
Home to the world's most comprehensive collection of work by Henri Matisse, the Baltimore Museum of Art is raising its international profile as an authority and a leading exhibitor of the French Modernist master. Last night, the museum moved closer to that goal as it announced a major gift of 77 Matisse prints - the largest acquisition since the Cone Collection laid the foundation for the BMA's Matisse holdings in 1950. And next Sunday, the museum will open Matisse: Painter as Sculptor, the first major U.S. exhibition of his sculpture in a generation.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | May 22, 1994
The Baltimore Museum of Art has one of the foremost collections of Henri Matisse works anywhere -- 42 paintings, 20 sculptures and hundreds of works on paper, almost all of them amassed by the Cone sisters during the artist's lifetime. But the BMA doesn't have any cutouts, the last great flowering of the artist's work. Made of painted paper cut by the artist, they are alive with the glorious color for which Matisse is known. But they are also among the most abstract works he produced, and Etta Cone, the sister who survived into the period when he produced them, did not follow him in that direction.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 4, 1992
New York -- In the grand and glorious Matisse show at the Museum of Modern Art, many works are more famous than the painting "Still Life with Blue Tablecloth" of 1909, but there may well be none that better exemplifies the artist's stance with respect to his time.It is a painting of a bowl of fruit, a coffee pot and a small carafeon a tablecloth covered with a large-scale swirling decorative pattern that serves as the principal subject of almost all of the picture.Because the tablecloth descends from the top of the picture behind the objects, and they also sit on it, we have some sense that it fulfills both a vertical and a horizontal function.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 25, 1993
In the summer of 1994 a group of 32 to 35 late Matisse cutouts will come to the Baltimore Museum of Art for 2 1/2 months. The cutouts will come from the Pompidou Center in Paris in exchange for the loan of Matisse's famous 1907 painting "The Blue Nude" from the museum's Cone collection to a Matisse show at the Pompidou, BMA director Arnold L. Lehman said.Since the museum's Matisse collection does not include examples of the late, colored paper cutouts for which the artist is extremely well known, the show will complement the BMA's major Matisse holdings.
NEWS
February 13, 1999
THE GOOD news is that the Cone Wing of the Baltimore Museum of Art will reopen in 2000.The new layout will display early modern art collected by Claribel and Etta Cone, especially works by Henri Matisse, which is the BMA holding most important to the nation's inventory.The bad news is that the Cone Wing will close April 18 for some 18 months, to replace the roof, reconfigure the main gallery for viewing more Matisses more intimately, and rearrange the floor above. During renovations, individual Matisses will be on display in other rooms and, possibly, other museums.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,sun art critic | October 28, 2007
Today, Henri Matisse is regarded as such a towering figure of 20th-century art that it's easy to forget this is not how he saw himself, especially during the difficult early years at the turn of the 20th century. He was stubborn about his ideas, but also uncertain about the direction of his art and dismayed by the vituperation of critics. He didn't set out to invent a theory or even a definition of modern art. Rather, he simply produced works that were themselves daring acts of exploration and discovery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2012
Walters Museum: Jane Meyerhoff's floral still lifes collection will be donated to the Walters Art Museum by philanthropist Robert Meyerhoff. Jane Meyerhoff loved flowers, but she was allergic to their fragrance and couldn't have them in the house. In 1991, she hit upon a substitute that fed her love for beauty without making her ill. She bought nearly two dozen blooms created by some of history's greatest artists and hung them on her dining room walls. It's a solution that will benefit Baltimore residents for decades after real-life blossoms would have dropped.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | November 22, 2011
Make gift-giving a local endeavor this season with items that exude Chesapeake charm. 1. Boordy Vineyard's Icons of Maryland wine series have engraved labels depicting iconic Maryland wildlife such as the Baltimore oriole bird on the riesling, the blue crab on the Boordy blush, rockfish on the seyval chardonnay vidal, a terrapin on the petit cabernet, Assateague ponies on the shiraz, the great blue heron on the vidal blanc and the mallard...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
Summer's almost over, your money's almost gone, and yet it feels like there's still so much left undone. What's a person to do? We can't help you with the money part. And much as we'd like to, there's no way to expand the calendar. But we can point out what you may not realize: There's plenty to do in and around Charm City in the waning days of summer, even with nary a penny in your pocket. Herewith, an itinerary for the thrifty, offering 50 no-cost activities to keep body and soul engaged over the next month or so. There's a lot to do, so get busy.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 25, 2009
For Henri Matisse, the object of drawing was not to display technical dexterity, but "to give simplicity and spontaneity to the expression, which should speak without clumsiness, directly to the mind of the spectator." His successful realization of that goal can be richly appreciated in the Baltimore Museum of Art's new exhibit "Matisse as Printmaker." The show focuses on a relatively unexplored side of the artist's legacy - from his first, quite traditional self-portraits to examples of Matisse's bold last works in the print genre, when just a few, thick black lines sufficed.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 5, 2007
Amechanical engineer by training, Jeff Mechlinksi used to spend his days poring over 3-D images of helicopter parts and other industrial gizmos on the glowing screen of his high-tech computer work station. Then the Matisses showed up. Turbocharged pistons and whirling blades made way for wall-sized statues and reclining nudes. Mechlinski works for Direct Dimensions, a digital imaging lab in Owings Mills.
NEWS
October 28, 2007
WORLD Turkey threatens rebel Kurds Turkey's top military commander promised yesterday to make Iraq-based Kurdish rebels "grieve with an intensity that they cannot imagine," while the prime minister said his nation would fight "when needed." pg 19a Unilateral cease-fire in Sudan The Sudanese government committed to an immediate cease-fire in Darfur at the opening of peace talks yesterday, but the announcement was not met by similar pledges from rebels, who boycotted the U.N.-brokered negotiations.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 5, 2007
Amechanical engineer by training, Jeff Mechlinksi used to spend his days poring over 3-D images of helicopter parts and other industrial gizmos on the glowing screen of his high-tech computer work station. Then the Matisses showed up. Turbocharged pistons and whirling blades made way for wall-sized statues and reclining nudes. Mechlinski works for Direct Dimensions, a digital imaging lab in Owings Mills.
FEATURES
By JOHN DORSEY and JOHN DORSEY,SUN ART CRITIC | March 3, 1998
After 12 years of controversy, the Affair of the Matisse Frames has ended. And a good thing for all concerned: the Matisse paintings, the memory of the Cone sisters, the museum-going public and the Baltimore Museum of Art.As part of a 1986 reinstallation of the Cone wing, former BMA deputy director Brenda Richardson removed most of the traditional frames the Cone sisters had put on their 42 Matisse paintings and replaced them with narrow metal strip frames....
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,sun art critic | October 28, 2007
Today, Henri Matisse is regarded as such a towering figure of 20th-century art that it's easy to forget this is not how he saw himself, especially during the difficult early years at the turn of the 20th century. He was stubborn about his ideas, but also uncertain about the direction of his art and dismayed by the vituperation of critics. He didn't set out to invent a theory or even a definition of modern art. Rather, he simply produced works that were themselves daring acts of exploration and discovery.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,sun art critic | October 28, 2007
It's hard to play favorites with an exhibition as visually luscious as Matisse: Painter as Sculptor, which opens today at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Still, plenty of artworks in this show practically beg you to stop and let your gaze linger. Below is a short list of things not to be missed: The Yellow Dress (1929-31) is Matisse's whimsical remix of a classic mythological figure, Venus, goddess of love, who was born from the sea of Platonic thought, then blown by Zephyrs to dry land atop a glistening shell.
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