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NEWS
September 10, 2001
Mathilde Storck, 57, travel group volunteer Mathilde Storck, who volunteered for an organization that assisted airport travelers for a decade, died Friday of lung cancer at her Baltimore home. She was 57. Born and raised in Munich, Germany, the former Mathilde Steigenberger moved to Baltimore in 1965, a year after marrying her husband, Denis, who was stationed in Germany with the U.S. Army. Once their three children were grown, Mrs. Storck began volun- teering in 1988 for Travelers Aid at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, where she assisted German-speaking travelers and others.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2011
Mathilde B. "Mimi" Lee, who as the wife of Lt. Gov. Blair Lee III eschewed the political pomp and circumstance of Annapolis for the fields and woods where she could hike, canoe and swim, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at Laurel Regional Hospital. The Silver Spring resident was 91. Mathilde Boal was named for her paternal grandmother, who was related to Christopher Columbus. Her father, Pierre de Lagarde Boal, was an American diplomat who had served as ambassador to Nicaragua and Bolivia.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 20, 2008
Mathilde C. "Teally" Holmes, a homemaker and volunteer, died of a heart attack April 9 at the Fairhaven Retirement Community in Sykesville. She was 82. Mathilde Clark was born in Baltimore and raised at Margaret Meadows, her parents' Stevenson farm. She was a graduate of St. Mary's in the Mountains in Littleton, N.H., and earned a bachelor's degree in education from Wheelock College in Boston in 1946. Mrs. Holmes taught school for several years in Wilmington, Del., before returning to Baltimore when she married Alexander Rutherfoord Holmes in 1951.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 20, 2008
Mathilde C. "Teally" Holmes, a homemaker and volunteer, died of a heart attack April 9 at the Fairhaven Retirement Community in Sykesville. She was 82. Mathilde Clark was born in Baltimore and raised at Margaret Meadows, her parents' Stevenson farm. She was a graduate of St. Mary's in the Mountains in Littleton, N.H., and earned a bachelor's degree in education from Wheelock College in Boston in 1946. Mrs. Holmes taught school for several years in Wilmington, Del., before returning to Baltimore when she married Alexander Rutherfoord Holmes in 1951.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A mysterious black asteroid, nearly the size of Rhode Island, may be seen up close for the first time Friday as a Maryland-built spacecraft races by on a high-speed photographic mission.NASA's Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft, built at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, will zip past the asteroid Mathilde at 22,000 mph Friday morning. The first photographs should be released later in the day.Scientists hope the 25-minute fly-by will yield more than 500 photographs and a wealth of new information on the carbon-rich black asteroids, thought to be some of the most primitive objects in the solar system.
NEWS
November 3, 2004
On October 30, 2004, VIRGINIA DRYDEN MOORE. Beloved wife of the late William Thomas Moore; sister of the late Mathilde Hopkins; aunt of Mary Catherine Hopkins Cockrell; great aunt of Catherine Mills Davis, Caren Dryden Mills, and Emily Mills Bosher; great great-aunt of Avery and Claire Davis. The Funeral Service will be held on Thursday at 11 A.M. at Our Lady of the Angels Chapel (Charlestown Retirement Community). Interment services will be held at 4 P.M. at the Whatcoat United Methodist Church Cemetery in Snow Hill, MD. Funeral arrangements by Singleton Funeral Home, P.A.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1998
Racing to turn lemons into lemonade, scientists at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab scrambled yesterday to build a new mission for their NEAR spacecraft after a rocket failure Sunday canceled plans to orbit the asteroid Eros on Jan. 10.Instead, NEAR (for Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous) was being reprogrammed to snap 500 photos of Eros as it flies by beginning at 1: 43 p.m. today.It will then reconfigure for another attempt to orbit the asteroid the next time it comes around the solar system, in May 2000.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 22, 2004
A Very Long Engagement unfolds amid the mechanized carnage of World War I. Yet everything in it is personal. That's why it's a masterpiece. The director, Jean-Pierre Jeunet, compels a viewer to feel each concussive jolt of cannon fire as a transgressive act - and to cheer whenever a conscripted man revolts against the inhuman condition. But Jeunet's most astonishing achievement is his celebration of hope transcending carnage. The movie hinges on the fate of five French soldiers court-martialed for wounding themselves in order to escape service.
NEWS
July 17, 2005
LEONARD LOFTIS WEBB, age 78, of Waldorf, MD, died Saturday, June 25, 2005, at his home. He was born July 5, 1926, in Atlanta, the son of the late G. Voil Webb and Annie Stephens Webb. He is survived by his wife, Mathilde (Tillie) L. Webb; his former wife, Dolores K. Webb; daughter Charleen Webb Wozniak; sons Barry N. Webb, Craig L. Webb and Christopher S. Webb; sister Wah Ni Tahe Webb Baker; sister-in-law Anna K. Webb; and their families. Mr. Webb grew up in Washington, served in the Merchant Marine during World War II, and held a number of facilities management positions in the private sector and federal government.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 9, 1993
THE HAIRDRESSER'S HUSBAND(Paramount, rated R, 1990)You wouldn't think a film about a guy who spends his life sitting in his wife's hair salon, admiring her and playing with her in between customers and after hours, would be much to look at. But "The Hairdresser's Husband," a French film with English subtitles, is one of the most original and delightful light-hearted romance movies in recent years. It also conveys an unusually appropriate sense of sensuality between a married couple, something sadly lacking in most movies.
NEWS
July 17, 2005
LEONARD LOFTIS WEBB, age 78, of Waldorf, MD, died Saturday, June 25, 2005, at his home. He was born July 5, 1926, in Atlanta, the son of the late G. Voil Webb and Annie Stephens Webb. He is survived by his wife, Mathilde (Tillie) L. Webb; his former wife, Dolores K. Webb; daughter Charleen Webb Wozniak; sons Barry N. Webb, Craig L. Webb and Christopher S. Webb; sister Wah Ni Tahe Webb Baker; sister-in-law Anna K. Webb; and their families. Mr. Webb grew up in Washington, served in the Merchant Marine during World War II, and held a number of facilities management positions in the private sector and federal government.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 22, 2004
A Very Long Engagement unfolds amid the mechanized carnage of World War I. Yet everything in it is personal. That's why it's a masterpiece. The director, Jean-Pierre Jeunet, compels a viewer to feel each concussive jolt of cannon fire as a transgressive act - and to cheer whenever a conscripted man revolts against the inhuman condition. But Jeunet's most astonishing achievement is his celebration of hope transcending carnage. The movie hinges on the fate of five French soldiers court-martialed for wounding themselves in order to escape service.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert K. Elder and Robert K. Elder,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 16, 2004
Last time Amelie director Jean-Pierre Jeunet visited Chicago, he felt trapped in a kind of unreality. "This success is too amazing to be true," Jeunet said in 2001, as Amelie reached the United States after besting Planet of the Apes and Shrek at the French box office. "I did a small film, and it's a huge success." This year, Jeunet releases a sprawling, big-budget World War I epic that he hopes will receive the same reception. A Very Long Engagement reteams him with Amelie pixie Audrey Tautou, who injects Jeunet's fablelike sensibilities into the stark realities of war. Based on the novel by Sebastien Japrisot, the film follows Mathilde (Tautou)
NEWS
November 3, 2004
On October 30, 2004, VIRGINIA DRYDEN MOORE. Beloved wife of the late William Thomas Moore; sister of the late Mathilde Hopkins; aunt of Mary Catherine Hopkins Cockrell; great aunt of Catherine Mills Davis, Caren Dryden Mills, and Emily Mills Bosher; great great-aunt of Avery and Claire Davis. The Funeral Service will be held on Thursday at 11 A.M. at Our Lady of the Angels Chapel (Charlestown Retirement Community). Interment services will be held at 4 P.M. at the Whatcoat United Methodist Church Cemetery in Snow Hill, MD. Funeral arrangements by Singleton Funeral Home, P.A.
NEWS
September 10, 2001
Mathilde Storck, 57, travel group volunteer Mathilde Storck, who volunteered for an organization that assisted airport travelers for a decade, died Friday of lung cancer at her Baltimore home. She was 57. Born and raised in Munich, Germany, the former Mathilde Steigenberger moved to Baltimore in 1965, a year after marrying her husband, Denis, who was stationed in Germany with the U.S. Army. Once their three children were grown, Mrs. Storck began volun- teering in 1988 for Travelers Aid at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, where she assisted German-speaking travelers and others.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The asteroid Eros is a 20-mile-long world with boulders the size of mansions, rocks layered like plywood and mysterious bright splotches on a terrain of mostly dull, moon-like grays and tans. And there are early signs that Eros may have once been part of a "lost planet." Pictures of Eros, snapped by the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous spacecraft during the first three days of orbital visit, have raised stacks of questions for scientists, who say that's just the way they like it. "Work is just starting, but it's already clear that Eros is much more exciting and geologically diverse than we had expected," said Andrew Cheng, NEAR project scientist at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert K. Elder and Robert K. Elder,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 16, 2004
Last time Amelie director Jean-Pierre Jeunet visited Chicago, he felt trapped in a kind of unreality. "This success is too amazing to be true," Jeunet said in 2001, as Amelie reached the United States after besting Planet of the Apes and Shrek at the French box office. "I did a small film, and it's a huge success." This year, Jeunet releases a sprawling, big-budget World War I epic that he hopes will receive the same reception. A Very Long Engagement reteams him with Amelie pixie Audrey Tautou, who injects Jeunet's fablelike sensibilities into the stark realities of war. Based on the novel by Sebastien Japrisot, the film follows Mathilde (Tautou)
NEWS
November 27, 1997
A SPACECRAFT FLOATS somewhere between Mars and Jupiter. It is millions of miles from its destination and from its origin -- the southern Howard County lab where it was designed and built.The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) is a 1,700-pound creation of scientists at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. The craft was launched in February 1996. Its three-year mission is to broaden man's knowledge about some intriguing celestial bodies. It may also reveal more clues to the origins of the universe.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1998
Racing to turn lemons into lemonade, scientists at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab scrambled yesterday to build a new mission for their NEAR spacecraft after a rocket failure Sunday canceled plans to orbit the asteroid Eros on Jan. 10.Instead, NEAR (for Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous) was being reprogrammed to snap 500 photos of Eros as it flies by beginning at 1: 43 p.m. today.It will then reconfigure for another attempt to orbit the asteroid the next time it comes around the solar system, in May 2000.
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