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By Shaun Borsh | December 11, 2012
The marriage of two disciplines, mathematics and art, may seem an unlikely union given an artist's innate desire for free expression. Meet Helaman Ferguson, whose sculpture is known for its root in mathematical design. Ferguson, of North Laurel, recently completed a massive undertaking: a 2 1/2-story, 9-plus ton bronze and granite sculpture, Umbilic Torus SC. Commissioned by the Simons Foundation, a private institution committed to the advancement of science and mathematics, the torus is being donated to Stony Brook University, in Long Island, N.Y. Ferguson, 72, who holds a doctorate in mathematics, designed umbilic torus, a three-dimensional doughnut-shaped figure with a single edge.
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RECORD STAFF REPORT | May 14, 2014
The Science and Mathematics Academy at Aberdeen High School is presenting its seventh annual Gallery Walk of senior capstone projects on Tuesday, May 20. The Gallery Walk presentation features a poster display of unique scientific research projects which were conducted by SMA seniors under the mentorship of professional scientists, engineers, mathematicians and faculty advisers. Research projects cover a variety of topics in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2003
George B. Mackiw, who taught mathematical sciences at Loyola College for 33 years and helped establish a Phi Beta Kappa chapter at its North Baltimore campus, died of pancreatic cancer Monday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 58 and lived in Rodgers Forge. Dr. Mackiw was born in Germany, and moved with his family in 1950 to New York. He earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics from Georgetown University in 1967 and a master's in the discipline from Cornell University in 1969, the year he began teaching at Loyola.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
I. William Lustbader, a retired Polytechnic Institute mathematics teacher, died of congestive heart failure April 15 at his Delray Beach, Fla., home. The former Northwest Baltimore resident was 98. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Hosiah Lustbader, who owned a hardware and home furnishings store later razed for the state office complex. He was born at home above the store. His mother, Mollie Lustbader, was a homemaker. His parents were from Eastern Europe. He was a 1932 graduate of City College, where he ran track.
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By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1999
At the chalkboard in Marilyn Rosenblatt's Pikesville Middle School classroom, 13-year-old Meghan Holly cranks out a wicked algebra problem."You're on today," Rosenblatt said. Meghan beams.In a nation full of adults petrified by fractions and percentages, eighth-grade pupils enrolled in the school's Algebra With Assistance tackle difficult equations involving negative integers with ease.The program, which serves predominantly black pupils, is aimed at narrowing the Baltimore County school system's minority achievement gap by encouraging black pupils to excel in mathematics -- a subject they must master to take advanced science and computer classes and to do well on college entrance exams.
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November 17, 1997
DURING HIS 56 YEARS as the longest-serving professor at the U.S. Naval Academy, Theodore J. Benac revealed the secrets of mathematics to some 10,000 midshipmen. As years went by, classes would graduate, younger colleagues would retire, but Dr. Benac went on instructing and grilling students five days a week in Annapolis.He was such an institution at the training school for Navy and Marine Corps officers that when he died last week at age 85 of prostrate cancer, a long-time friend mused, "I was really shocked when I heard about it. I thought Ted would never die."
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
Dean R. Wagner, a retired mathematics teacher who spent his retirement researching Baltimore residential communities, died of cancer Sept. 11 at his Original Northwood home. He was 77. He was born in Piqua, Ohio, and attended high school there. His father ran a refrigeration business and his mother was a music teacher. He earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics at Ohio Wesleyan University and had master's degrees from Ohio State University and Montclair State University in New Jersey.
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By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | April 22, 2001
President Bush says our schools need to do a better job of teaching mathematics, and I agree with him 150 percent. Many high-school students today can't even calculate a square root! Granted, I can't calculate a square root, either, but I used to be able to, for a period of approximately 15 minutes back in 1962. At least I think that was a square root. It might have been a "logarithm." But whatever it was, if I had to learn how to do it, these kids today should have to learn it, too. As President Bush so eloquently put it in his address to Congress: "Mathematics are one of the fundamentaries of educationalizing our youths."
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Letter to The Aegis | January 28, 2014
Last spring, the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences (CBMS), an organization comprised of seventeen professional mathematics societies, stated their position with regard to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The CBMS position statement is provided herein: "In a great act of foresight for this nation, most of the states have now adopted a consistent set of expectations for school mathematics, called the Common Core State Standards. Building on long years of work, the Common Core State Standards are an auspicious advance in mathematics education.
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December 2, 1990
WESTMINSTER - Francis "Skip" Fennell, associate professor of education at Western Maryland College, has received the 1990 Outstanding Mathematics Educator award from the Maryland Council of Teachers of Mathematics.Fennell is the second educator at WMC to receive this award; the other was James Lightner, professor of mathematics, who was given the award in 1986.He is one of only a handful of educators in higher education to have received this award, according to Geraldine Rossi, MCTM awards chairwoman.
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By Kareem Burney | April 9, 2014
The dearth of women and certain minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields represents a huge problem within this country and is a crisis often repeated in the news today. These stories often provide the same problem and, more often than not, suggest the same solution: that the education system must improve to better provide STEM skills to minorities before college. I am not in disagreement with this view; however, as an African American child growing up in Detroit, I developed a love and skill for science more from programs within the community rather than those within the school system.
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Letter to The Aegis | January 28, 2014
Last spring, the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences (CBMS), an organization comprised of seventeen professional mathematics societies, stated their position with regard to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The CBMS position statement is provided herein: "In a great act of foresight for this nation, most of the states have now adopted a consistent set of expectations for school mathematics, called the Common Core State Standards. Building on long years of work, the Common Core State Standards are an auspicious advance in mathematics education.
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December 26, 2013
By the time many kids get to second grade they're already wondering whether they'll ever be "good at math. " Yet researchers at the University of Michigan say all kids understand a lot more math than adults usually give them credit for. Last week they published results suggesting that children are capable of learning and understanding basic mathematical concepts and operations at a much earlier age than previously thought. Does this mean 5 year olds can do calculus? Not quite. But it does suggest states could step up math instruction for preschoolers - and offers further proof that well-designed pre-K programs serve a much more important educational function than simply providing free day care for busy parents.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Jun-ichi Igusa, a retired Johns Hopkins university professor of mathematics who researched number theory and algebraic geometry, died of a stroke Nov. 24 at the Holly Hill Nursing Home. The Hunt Valley resident was 89. "He was a giant in his field," said Bernard Shiffman, chair of the Hopkins mathematics department. "He was meticulous in everything he did. Even when he taught elementary calculus, he was thorough and prepared his classes perfectly. He was warm to people and interested in helping his students.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
Dean R. Wagner, a retired mathematics teacher who spent his retirement researching Baltimore residential communities, died of cancer Sept. 11 at his Original Northwood home. He was 77. He was born in Piqua, Ohio, and attended high school there. His father ran a refrigeration business and his mother was a music teacher. He earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics at Ohio Wesleyan University and had master's degrees from Ohio State University and Montclair State University in New Jersey.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
Susa Kessler, a retired World Bank analyst who had fled Nazi Germany as a child, died of breast cancer complications Tuesday at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Canton resident was 88. Born in Stuttgart, Germany, she was the daughter of Dr. Caesar Hirsch, an ear, nose and throat doctor, and Felicia Hearst. Family members said that her father heard that Adolf Hitler and his government planned to blacklist him because he was a Jew. "To avoid arrest, Dr. Hirsch sent his children to Switzerland in the company of their grandmother," said Ms. Kessler's son, John J. "Jack" Condliffe of Timonium.
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By Tricia Bishop | December 6, 2002
This table shows overall 2002 index scores from the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program for Howard County third-, fifth- and eighth-grade pupils. The score is equivalent to the percentage of pupils who scored at a satisfactory level on the MSPAP test. Scores from 2001 are in parenthesis. Third Grade: Reading - 53 percent (60.1) Writing - 55.7 (65.1) Language uses - 58.4 (62.5) Science - 46.9 (54.9) Social studies - 46 (56.1) Mathematics - 44.6 (57.8) Fifth Grade: Reading - 61.4 (66.5)
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By Sherry Stravino and Sherry Stravino,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2003
Sarah Chamberlin of Bel Air is participating in a five-week Summer Program for Women in Mathematics sponsored by the mathematics department of George Washington University in Washington. The program is in its ninth year of encouraging female students in mathematical disciplines by offering them an opportunity to interact with women who have pursued careers in mathematics in academia, industry and government, said Murli Gupta, professor and director. Chamberlin, one of 16 women chosen to participate in the program, is a junior at Hollins University in Roanoke, Va. The George Washington program consists of four major topics, which change each year.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 1, 2013
Have you ever ridden a tricycle with square wheels or floated smoothly on a sea of lumpy acorns? The eighth-graders at Harford Friends School did just that when they visited the National Museum of Mathematics (also known as MoMath) in New York City with their teacher, Ray Pitz, and parent Chip Emely. Opened in December 2012, MoMath makes the sometimes ethereal concepts of mathematics truly concrete even for middle school algebra students. Typically crowded with spectators of all ages, MoMath offers a unique collection of hands-on exhibits for everyone, from elementary math to physics and beyond.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 8, 2013
The William J. Sacco Critical Thinking Foundation presented 21 Harford County mathematics students and teachers with awards on March 10. More than 175 students, teachers and foundation sponsors walked through the doors of Liberatore's in Bel Air to gather for the second William J. Sacco Awards Banquet. Dressed to the nines, the anxious scholars awaited the results. The 2013 set of scholarships included all 10 Harford County public schools and The John Carroll School - expanded from just C. Milton Wright and Bel Air high schools.
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