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By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1998
A Loyola College student, scheduled to graduate tomorrow, drowned in 10 feet of water after he slipped along the banks of the Little Gunpowder River yesterday afternoon, Baltimore County police said.Keith Shane Miceli, 22, of the 1900 block of Shanklin Road was pulled from the river by Baltimore County Fire Department paramedics, but attempts to revive him failed, said police spokesman Sgt. Kevin B. Novak.A man who was sunbathing on the bank below the Little Loch Raven Dam saw Miceli walking a yellow Labrador retriever about 1: 30 p.m., police said.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Denise Charrier McQuighan, a database engineer and Johns Hopkins University graduate, died of cancer March 5 at her Gaithersburg home. She was 55. Born Denise Anne Charrier in Cincinnati, she was the daughter of George Charrier, an engineer who lives in Cody, Wyo., and Jacqueline Watson Charrier, a Hunt Valley resident. Mrs. McQuighan was a 1976 graduate of Cincinnati's Western Hills High School and earned a bachelor's degree in mathematical sciences from the Johns Hopkins University.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Denise Charrier McQuighan, a database engineer and Johns Hopkins University graduate, died of cancer March 5 at her Gaithersburg home. She was 55. Born Denise Anne Charrier in Cincinnati, she was the daughter of George Charrier, an engineer who lives in Cody, Wyo., and Jacqueline Watson Charrier, a Hunt Valley resident. Mrs. McQuighan was a 1976 graduate of Cincinnati's Western Hills High School and earned a bachelor's degree in mathematical sciences from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | January 28, 2014
Last spring, the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences (CBMS), an organization comprised of seventeen professional mathematics societies, stated their position with regard to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The CBMS position statement is provided herein: "In a great act of foresight for this nation, most of the states have now adopted a consistent set of expectations for school mathematics, called the Common Core State Standards. Building on long years of work, the Common Core State Standards are an auspicious advance in mathematics education.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | January 28, 2014
Last spring, the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences (CBMS), an organization comprised of seventeen professional mathematics societies, stated their position with regard to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The CBMS position statement is provided herein: "In a great act of foresight for this nation, most of the states have now adopted a consistent set of expectations for school mathematics, called the Common Core State Standards. Building on long years of work, the Common Core State Standards are an auspicious advance in mathematics education.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | September 1, 2009
As Baltimore schools opened Monday, students streamed into Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, which even the seniors didn't recognize after a two-year, $28 million renovation that transformed the worn interior into one better able to support students studying math and the sciences. Among the school's new features are science labs and a robotics lab where students can design robots on computers, build them in a shop and operate them in a large room. The interior boasts wide hallways, larger windows, and a new cafeteria and library.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1998
AN INTERNATIONAL comparison of school achievement in math and science struck a raw nerve last week. The study concluded that even the United States' elite high school seniors, those in advanced physics and calculus, are behind their peers in most of 14 other nations.Previous reports from the respected Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) had given U.S. partisans reason to believe that our kids are holding their own. Even the 1997 results found U.S. fourth-graders slightly above the international average in five of the six topics measured.
FEATURES
May 8, 1994
Darius Springfield, a senior at Hannah More Center School, was one of 370 high school journalists selected to attend the Washington Journalism Conference in April, sponsored by the Congressional Youth Leadership Council in cooperation with the National Press Club.*Edward R. Scheinerman, associate professor of mathematical sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Engineering, has been named an Outstanding Professor for 1993-1994 by the Vector Marketing Corp.*Karen Fish, a creative writing instructor at Loyola College, was selected to receive the 1993 Towson State University Prize for Literature.
FEATURES
May 16, 1993
Rachel A. Florey, a student at Western School of Technology, is among the nation's top 10 vocational students selected to receive the All-American Vocational Student Award, a national awards program sponsored by SERVISTAR Corporation. The presentations will be made May 16 during the semiannual convention for the SERVISTAR Corporation at the Baltimore Convention Center.*Gina Zilioli of Towson, a freshman at Notre Dame Preparatory School, is one of 48 recipients of an honorable mention award in the 1993 DuPont Challenge, a nationwide science essay program.
NEWS
May 21, 1997
Following are commencement exercises scheduled in the Baltimore area this week:TodayUniversity of Maryland Baltimore County: Undergraduate exercises, 1 p.m. at Baltimore Arena. Speakers: Donna E. Shalala, U.S. secretary of Health and Human Services; Carl Djerassi, chemist, novelist and inventor of the birth-control pill; and valedictorian Juliana K. Sander.TomorrowThe Johns Hopkins University: Campus- wide ceremony at 9 a.m. in Gilman Quadrangle; speaker, Hopkins President William R. Brody.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | September 1, 2009
As Baltimore schools opened Monday, students streamed into Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, which even the seniors didn't recognize after a two-year, $28 million renovation that transformed the worn interior into one better able to support students studying math and the sciences. Among the school's new features are science labs and a robotics lab where students can design robots on computers, build them in a shop and operate them in a large room. The interior boasts wide hallways, larger windows, and a new cafeteria and library.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1998
A Loyola College student, scheduled to graduate tomorrow, drowned in 10 feet of water after he slipped along the banks of the Little Gunpowder River yesterday afternoon, Baltimore County police said.Keith Shane Miceli, 22, of the 1900 block of Shanklin Road was pulled from the river by Baltimore County Fire Department paramedics, but attempts to revive him failed, said police spokesman Sgt. Kevin B. Novak.A man who was sunbathing on the bank below the Little Loch Raven Dam saw Miceli walking a yellow Labrador retriever about 1: 30 p.m., police said.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1998
AN INTERNATIONAL comparison of school achievement in math and science struck a raw nerve last week. The study concluded that even the United States' elite high school seniors, those in advanced physics and calculus, are behind their peers in most of 14 other nations.Previous reports from the respected Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) had given U.S. partisans reason to believe that our kids are holding their own. Even the 1997 results found U.S. fourth-graders slightly above the international average in five of the six topics measured.
NEWS
November 23, 2011
As a proud Johns Hopkins University alumna with a lifelong love of sports, reading Kevin Cowherd 's piece ("Hopkins stays grounded as it soars," November 19) about the Hopkins football program was a real pleasure. Coaching is a demanding profession, and at times those who choose it do not set a perfect example for his or her players. When a coach falls short, especially in a very visible program, the negative publicity seems endless. The recent case at Penn State is a glaring example.
NEWS
May 28, 2006
The University of Mississippi graduated four African-American students with doctorates in math last weekend, setting a university record and dealing another blow to the institution's segregated past. This news was celebrated in academic circles, and rightly so. That such a small number was considered significant, however, illustrates the dearth of black students receiving doctorates in math and other sciences nationally. It also points to the need for continued recruitment and mentoring of black doctoral candidates by American universities.
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